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Quartermaster

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    Shenandoah Valley, Virginia
  1. BTW - to answer the original inquiry - I believe I have several pairs of the adapters squirreled away somewhere in a box. I remember finding them either on eBay, a flea market or a militaria show many moons ago. Since them I have found the correct original (early) pole sets for my several 2 man mountain tents so the adapters were stored away and pretty much forgotten.
  2. The tent, mountain, two-man, complete is first described in TM 10-275 Principles of Cold Weather Clothing and Equipment dated 10/26/1944. The tent poles required for the original tent were a set of 12 pole sections made of rather thin (compared to standard shelter half tent poles) in natural wood finish. Two compete poles of 3 sections each were located at either end of the tent attached at the top in letter “A” fashion with each pole threaded through sleeves along the end edges for tent support. Each pole had a bottom section with a spike on bottom, a middle section with hardware to accept the top and bottom sections and a top section which incorporated either a disk and loop matching pieces or with rectangular loop connectors – either of these united the left and right poles together at the top. Later in Change Order C-2, the adapters in this discussion were described as STANDARD – replacing the older pole configuration. The new instructions were to use 12 regular shelter half tent pole sections (the later green painted ones with the metal point at one end and a metal surrounded hole to accept the make ends of another pole section) – 4 total complete poles of 3 pole sections each – one pair at each tent entrance end. The adapter was introduced to accept the female end of each pole at the apex of the letter “A” pole at each end and at the bottom the spike went into the ground. Thus, the adapters were accepted as STANDARD ISSUE either towards the war’s end or shortly thereafter and originally for the 2 man mountain tent. How they were later used, officially or unofficially, is an interesting question.
  3. Here's one of my footlocker displays
  4. Those small bottles of Halazone tablets were a component of the Accessory Packet that was given out with a days issue of C Rations (3 meals = 6 cans). The contents were revised several times but basically included cigarettes, matches, toilet paper, gum and the water purification tabs (usually numbering 12 to 15 tabs depending on the manfucturer.) Later on a can opener (p38) was included enclosed in a small paper envelope with usage instructions. Attached is a sample proof of the Accessory Packet bag that were produced by the Reynolds Company (later Reynolds Aluminum) located in Richmond, VA. Reynolds made the bags themselves and a ration contractor amassed the contents and filled the bags. The second picture is a proof of the entire Accessory Packet bag.
  5. I have The Grenade Recognition Manual Volume 1 US Grenades & Accessories by Darryl W. Lynn. I don't know if it is the definitive book on the subject nor if it would be a suitable reference for the hard core grenade collector but it has helped with my needs.
  6. BINGO! Plus the delivery tube affixed to the top of the cap appears to be of round stock instead of square - just as shown in the drawings that are a part of the Patent submission.
  7. I strongly doubt that the first version is anything like you suggested and would rather keep looking for an authentic example. From what I can tell, the fuel delivery on the first can (AKA type one) was through a flexible rubber tube - think black rubber flexible automotive fuel line material. The description says that the top of the tube has a top plug inserted into the metal screw cap. When used the plug was removed by unscrewing, which then allows the tubing to be revealed and is pulled out through the metal cap where a lower plug stops the tube from being completely pulled from the can. This lower plug is then screwed into the threaded hole in the cap apparently to seal the cap to prevent or minimize fuel leakage. This lower plug must be attached to the tube that has a hole in its center to allow fuel flow. It is possible that fuel leakage plus the ease of losing the top plug led to the change to the cans. I vision the tube arrangement somewhat like today's gasoline (Blitz) cans where the nozzle is pushed in through the center of the can cap and pulled out to allow the gasoline to be poured out. It is interesting that I had never noticed that the can pictured in the WW2 dated QM catalog had the cap located towards the end of the top and not centered like the examples I own and see quite often. In searching, the only picture of the opening to the side is in that catalog plus I have a copy of the Patton Office paperwork for that cap which seems to have been submitted in 1943 and approved in 1945 that has a drawing of the cap opening to the side.
  8. You have a post WW2 US military 1 quart gas container. The U.S. Container, Fuel, 1-Quart came into being during WW2. It was originally to be supplied to mountain troops, like the 10th Mountain Division. These troops were also issued the M1942 single burner stoves (both wheeled and Mod versions) and the Mountain Cook Set. It is described in Technical Manual TM 10-275 Principles of Cold Weather Clothing & Equipment 10/26/1944. There the 1 quart container is described as two versions - the early version with a rubber tube to transfer the gas then a can with a square metal delivery tube affixed to the cap. The earlier version probably proved a poor design thus leading to the metal "tube" version. The later version had a rotating cap that allowed or shut off the fuel flow. The second version is also listed in the Quartermaster Supply Catalog QM 3-4 List of Items For Issue To Troops, Miscellaneous Organizational Equipment dated 1945 as Stock No. 42-C-21340. The third and possibly the final version of the 1 quart can is like yours – basically all were just a 1 quart can like paint thinner comes in – but to simplify production and conserve materials, has a simple metal pour spout fashioned to fit around the can neck and could be swung out for use, then rotated back for storage. The simple can cap also helped with leakage. I have several of the second and third versions. The second is marked on the bottom with the name and part numbers (all my second versions are marked 1951 even though they were identified as early as 1944). The third versions are all unmarked except for the yellow GASOLINE painted on the side. In all my searching, I have never run across a first version can but would love to add one to my collection so if any of you has one they would like to part with – please contact me! Below are pictures of (1) the can description from TM 10-275, (2) the catalog page from QM 3-4, (3) both 2nd & 3rd versions – 2 2nd ver. with the square tube cap on & off, (4) close up of the 2nd ver. cap, and (5) close up of the 3rd ver. cap.
  9. The Curtis Candy Company lists that it's Jolly Jack was included in WW2 US K Rations. It does not refer to the Jolly Jack as a candy bar but only as candy. The company's literature does not mention any other of their products that were included in K Rations. They are famous for the Baby Ruth (introduced in 1920) and Butterfinger (introduced in 1923) candy bars but were the creators of a myraid of candy products since the company's founding in 1916 so it is probably that other Curtis products found their way into the hands of US servicemen and women during the war.
  10. Attached is a portion of the blueprint of the specifications of the Tent, Shelter Half, Details dated 12/12/1940 which is for the earlier open ended shelter half. The guy rope is shown as being cotton rope, 3/16 inch in diameter which has a length of 7 foot 1 inch. Not included in the specified length is an additional 5 inches that is turned back at one end to form a loop of which 2 inches is the size of the open loop plus an additional 3 inches that is sewn (zig zag manner) parallel to the main line to secure the tent pin loop line end. Also, the opposite end is sewn in the same zig zag manner on the final 1 1/2 inch to prevent the end of the rope from unraveling. The blueprint for the later style (tent with two closed end flaps) is dated 11/25/1941 but does not have any information concerning the guy rope so it is to be assumed that the guy rope for both styles is the same.
  11. In the Quartermaster Vol 1 book from the US Army in WW2 (the green books), this tool is referred to as the Combination Intrenching Tool. It was designed to replace the folding M-1943 intrenching tool (shovel), pick mattock and the ax. These latter items were reclassified as limited standard and were to be issued to troops other than combat and combat support units until exhausted. The new combination tools was standardized on September 21, 1945. Because the war ended before this action was completed no procurement was made. Production picked up again as needs grew before and during the Korean War. Concerning the Ames 1945 shovel - either there were limited pre-production runs during the development phase or this was part of start up production in the late 40s or early 50s when remaining stock parts that were left over as WW2 ended and contracts were suspended with left over components. Since the new shovel was basically identical to the M-1943 shovel (with the pick head added) the old M-1943 parts could be used to construct the newer shovel.
  12. Although Hollywood - one can see a glider snatch in the CBI at the end of the 1945 movie Operation Burma starring Errol Flynn. This is an Interesting movie done with the cooperation of the US military which provided lots of period equipment. One problem is that the movie really infuriated Churchill and the Brits, who felt the movie portrayed a view that America dominated the war in the CBI and gave no credit to the British, Indian & Commonwealth country's participation in that theater (which were actually larger players than the US there.) The movie was "banned" in the UK until 1952 and was aired with an apology.
  13. Although Hollywood - one can see a glider snatch in the CBI at the end of the 1945 movie Operation Burma starring Errol Flynn. This is an Interesting movie done with the cooperation of the US military which provided lots of period equipment. One problem is that the movie really infuriated Churchill and the Brits, who felt the movie portrayed a view that America dominated the war in the CBI and gave no credit to the British, Indian & Commonwealth country's participation in that theater (which were actually a larger players than the US there.) The movie was "banned" in the UK until 1952 and was aired with an apology.
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