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dan_the_hun84

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    West Coast
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    Looking for ww2 Ike jackets or service coats for the following Divisions:

    65th
    71st
    75th
    87th
    97th
    Any Armored Force units


    ALWAYS looking for any 65th ID material

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  1. suffice to say even if I had $500 to spend on an Ike jacket right now- sure as hell wouldn't be this one
  2. I think I am (relatively) well versed on Ike jackets- but this one vexes me..maybe I am wrong https://www.ebay.com/itm/ORIGINAL-UNUSUAL-Ike-Jacket-with-39th-Regt-AAAO-and-WWI-Tank-Corps-Insignia/193531352308?_trkparms=aid%3D777001%26algo%3DDISCO.FEED%26ao%3D1%26asc%3D20200211172457%26meid%3D85fb5780165648f3a5444f02806ce319%26pid%3D101213%26rk%3D1%26rkt%3D1%26mehot%3Dnone%26itm%3D193531352308%26pmt%3D0%26noa%3D1%26pg%3D2380057%26algv%3DRecommendingSearch%26brand%3D&_trksid=p2380057.c101213.m46344&_trkparms=pageci%3A83345fa0-b4d6-11ea-a563-74dbd1800909|parentrq%3Ade1de4041720ac3ec32807bbfff0baf0|iid%3A1 If i recall the seller also has an iffy reputation- but again correct if i am wrong
  3. probably a veterans group or may some weird subset of the NG or local militia
  4. They produced a bazillion slot broach bronze stars during WW2- I know stone cold they were issued through at least Vietnam- my dad was awarded one in 1968 and it was this type.
  5. this may help http://www.63rdinfdiv.com/files/0003-Complete_Alphabetical_Roster_of_Division_Personnel-1-signed.pdf The website claims that it is all personnel that was ever assigned to the 63rd during WW2- hopefully hes on there
  6. Use a gel-based stripper thats safe for wood (home depot) if you are inclined to do so. will cost more money than its worth- but if its a project you are after rather than an investment- will be simple to do
  7. insignia on the German jacket and the third set- the third one is undated but based off the ribbon bar with the longevity ribbon and the fact it has the least wear- was probably one of his later sets. It has bullion as well but not as nice as the German one. Oak leafs are silver just tarnished
  8. Found these three uniform sets in a surplus store near San Bernardo CA- the uniforms themselves are typical 50s/60s style, all have nice cloth sewn ribbon bars. And all the insignia looks to have been there awhile and un-messed (unusual for a surplus find) and were reasonably priced. One oft the uniforms is German made, dated 1956 has direct bullion US collar insignia and oak leafs. All were named to Maurice M H*annah. Figured I should keep these together so I cut a deal for all three for $100 After doing some research, found out the owner enlisted in 1942, rose up the ranks to a commission and served in the USAAF-USAF from 1942-60, the USAF Reserve from 60-67 ending up as a Lt Col. He was an ordnance and safety specialist. Digging further, he lived after leaving the AF (and off and on before) in San Bernadino since the 50s and passed away there in 2004- and was laid to rest in Riverside National Cemetery just to the south. so the uniforms never left more than a 30mi area since he retired in 1967. Going further yet- turns out his son is my neighbor- lives three streets over. We made contact and will talk further. Not exactly a high speed or rare set- but still nice and proves its a small world sometimes even still jacket on left is dated 1955 and made at Lorwy AFB in Denver (I grew up about 5mi away from there) one on right is German made dated 1956- direct bullion insignia
  9. I always thought it was something like that or "Overseas Invasion Special Enginners" being you see them a lot on enginner, QM , Ord etc uniforms
  10. I just snagged this group off of ebay as its named and numbered and I like engineer stuff. I have seen/owned a few jackets with the OISE tab/rocker- but I have never been able to get clarity on what it was FOR I have seen it in conjunction with the ADSEC patch, as well as it being worn alone on the right bottom sleeve any info would be useful- can only find blurbs here and there on what OISE was
  11. I recently purchased a WW2 naval jumper that had an interesting rate- was told that the rate was "mail main" and only exited from 44-48 in this case its named to a " HC SCHLEY MaM 1/C" I am not a Navy rate expert by any means, but haven't seen many pics or drawings of this rate- understand it was later changed to "postal clerk" and looks different Any information about the rate or man would be appreciated
  12. Depends on what the vehicles owners say, yes its a tank and yes by its nature they are hard to damage, being, well its a tank. But parts are 70+ years old and expensive. Honestly its hard to explain, it is and isn't like driving a car with a standard transmission- its likely they wont let you go fast enough anyway to require a gear change, plus I am sure they will give you plenty of clear instruction.
  13. I have driven an M4A3 a few times, I was back home in Colorado part of a volunteer group that worked on a privately owned M4A3. I have seen the M24 in action, but never driven. The M4 is basically like driving an old Caterpillar tractor coupled with a manual transmission- its not that difficult - but takes a bit of coordination and arm strength that the steering tillers require some muscle and depending on the condition of the clutch- that can be a beast too. The M24 i believe is an automatic and being a lighter smaller vehicle is easier to operate. Its also (depending on your size, physical condition and the model of M4 they have) easier to get in an out of. We had a early small hatch M4A3 and boy did those hatches feel small sometimes. in short, for my money- M4. It is the quintessential tank of the western Allies in WW2- I would say its worth the extra $ and effort it takes to run one.
  14. The only thing that is slightly suspicious to me- and its not necessarily a deal breaker is that its an "ike" jacket. Although they were around- they tended to be more mass issued after ve-day and were far from universal issue in Mar 45 and the fact his laundry number is in it would mean if it was his- it had to been issued to him at the latest Mar 45 (obviously). To me a four pocket service coat would make me feel a little better- but again- there is nothing screaming humped up- is there a way to check the spec label for a contract date? if its past being a 1944 date- I would really have doubts- even a late 1944 contract one would be pushing it in my mind- example - lets say the contract was issued Dec 44- that would mean it would have to have been produced, shipped overseas by ship, and issued within a space of +/- 3 months, damn quick by WW2 standards, and fuel, food and ammunition took priority over clothing
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