Jump to content

Grizzly Adams

Members
  • Content Count

    79
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Profile Information

  • Location
    New Mexico
  1. Most likely the ships mascot. Very common during this era.
  2. I believe the letter states that it will be a Littoral Combat Ship LCS. LCS
  3. Lots of Navy "in country," and darn few of them were SEALS!
  4. I know this is an old thread, but I came across this article, and thought it should be read by anyone interested in the USS Olympia and her preservation. Sorry if this is a duplicate. Move if needed. http://www.usni.org/magazines/proceedings/2010-07/nobody-asked-me-olympia-needs-our-help
  5. Thanks for an interesting post. Great story and a great couple of guys.
  6. +1 Been there, done that, 1968.
  7. Actually, the white lanyard shown is a knife lanyard. While a Bos'n would use such a lanyard for his pipe, the lanyard was an item issued to all bluejackets during this period. It should be noted that while intended for the deck knife, many times sailors who did not need the knife for their duties used it to secure their locker key. From the 1897 USN uniform regulations: Knife Lanyard For all enlisted men, except chief petty officers, officers' messmen, and bandsmen (Pl. XI, fig. 1).—Of bleached white cotton. To be flat sennit, one-half (1/2) to nine-sixteenths (9/16) of an inch wide, tightly laid up; to have a turk's head slide; and to be long enough, when around the neck, to allow the knife to be used with arm extended.
  8. This style used two EverReady EN-6. Kinda hard to find, but last time I checked Ralph's Electric (PH# 1-337-234-4507) had them - NOS. I think they are no longer made, but believe the Chinese are making a substitute for same, FWIW. :pinch:
  9. I wore mine very little while in the Navy. Spent most of my time in Vietnam! However, I still have it, and have worn it a lot since my return to the "Land of the Big PX."
  10. Very interesting material. It provides a neat little peak into the life of a Bluejacket in the pre WWII US Navy. It is interesting that "Smokers" (boxing matches) were so common, and so popular, in the fleet. Wonder when they were fazed out? I have a book called "Once Upon A Wagon" written by an old friend of mine, in which he records his experiences as a young lad on the USS Wisconsin. Interesting the things he found worthy of note - like food! Thanks for a great post.
  11. I would be interested, if the uniforms are indeed correct. :thumbsup:
  12. Good luck with the uniform! Sounds like a great project. :thumbsup:
  13. Yes and No! "Flap to be six and one-half (6 1/2) inches deep, with a crow's foot worked in black silk at the lower corners; upper corners to be rounded; to have eleven (11) buttonholes around the sides and upper edge so arranged as to show seven (7) across the top and three (3) on each side. " Note that the regulation says 11buttonholes and is describing the number of buttons by position on the flap. Here's a pic of a original trousers with 11 button flap, shown on an old thread: For more pics and information see this thread: http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/ind...niform&st=0 The 1905 regs say 7 across the top and 4 on each side, for 13. Sorry for taking this off topic.
  14. I thought the 13 button trousers did not come into use until 1905. :think: During the SAW, I believe the trousers still had 11 buttons. From the 1897 regs: Flap to be six and one-half (6 1/2) inches deep, with a crow's foot worked in black silk at the lower corners; upper corners to be rounded; to have eleven (11) buttonholes around the sides and upper edge so arranged as to show seven (7) across the top and three (3) on each side. Pocket in waistband on each side. Small black navy but­tons to be used.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.