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usmc grunt

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Everything posted by usmc grunt

  1. It is possible that the blue and white stripe, along with the rank insignia, are original to the liner and the 101 decals could have been added later. Here is a side by side comparison of the 2 liners. Remove the 101 decals and the stripes are a spot on match.
  2. Neither of them have a zip code. The one on the bottom was in an early USMC issue First Aid Kit in a WWII pouch dated 1945 that was reissued in the early 1960's. This kit contained both Korean War stock numbers (2-003-180 bandage), 1961 dated Water Purification Tablets, and early DSA (1962) medical items. I was able to date the bottom one to April 1961 based on the package in the attached photo. My research indicates that the 11-digit Federal Stock Number was first used by the Defense Munitions Board's Cataloging Agency in 1949 to identify items in the Joint Army-Navy Catalog System. I tried to locate the date that this FSN was assigned to no avail. I believe the top one is a pre-1961, mid to late 1950's issue that was still in use during the Vietnam era.
  3. PM with address sent. Thank you, sir.
  4. I've found quite a few photos of the M2 in use by Marines and Navy Corpsman in Korea. Would like to know what the components were. 1st photo 1950, second photo 1953, 3rd photo Corpsman with Unit One and M-2 Kit.
  5. Do you happen to have a copy of the Component List for the 1950's Unit One / M-3 Medic Bag? I have one for the 1960's era dated 1 August 1965. I need a copy for a 1950's set that I am putting together. Thanks for your assistance.
  6. I have a tube of Lip Balm that I acquired with a group of WWII and Korean war medical supplies. The tube has the manual push at the base, as opposed to the twist knob, and appears to be an earlier issue than the push tubes that were issued in the early 1960 First Aid kits that were issued to Marines. The photo shows a side by side comparison of these two tubes, note that while both tubes are metallic have the exact same Federal Stock Number, they are different in length and diameter. Is this a Korean war era issue?
  7. I have a tourniquet, unissued, white in color, that was acquired along with a grouping of WWII and Korean war medical supplies. Is this military issue? If so, is it a component of a medical or survival kit? Your assistance is greatly appreciated.
  8. I have a snake bite kit that was acquired along with a grouping of WWII and Korean war medical supplies. Is this military issue? If so, is it a component of a medical or survival kit? Your assistance is greatly appreciated.
  9. Thank you, sir, I appreciate it. I will hold onto the P&S 2" x 5 yard plaster, Halco & MS iodine vials. I will place the rest of these items for sale on a vintage medicine site. I also have an interesting snake bite kit that includes an A.E. Halperin Iodine dab, a white Tourniquet that I need to ID. Will post those items now.
  10. Thank you, sir, I appreciate it. I haven't seen it in any photos as a component of the WWII or Korean war Corpsman's Unit One bag, what kit, if any, is this a component of?
  11. Over the years I've acquired a significant collection of WWII and Korean War era USGI medical supplies. Among the USGI medical supplies I've obtained, there are vintage boxes of gauze, spools of adhesive tape, bottles of Mercurochrome, Merthiolate, iodine, Spirits of Ammonia and tins of Ointment. I have no idea as to whether these items were part of a medical kit or an item that a GI purchased and added to his medical supply for personal use. Are any of these items part of a med kit? What say you?
  12. Over the years, I've accumulated a decent lot of medical supplies. The majority of these items are easily identified as WWII era. This black roll of rubberized material held together with a strip of adhesive tape - similar to an Ace Bandage, was among a group of WWII medical supplies. I have no idea as to what it is or what is was used for. It is 2-1/8 " in width and 2" in diameter. What is this?
  13. This is the 1974 model with reinforced material at the canteen cup edge.
  14. Photos 1 and 2 are a 1972 cover with metal fasteners - clearly reads M-1967. Photos 3 and 4 are a 1973 model.
  15. It is definitely an M-1967 cover The 1968 and 1969 models have plastic fasteners. Since the plastic fasteners had a tendency to break, they returned to the metal fasteners in 1970. I have a 1971, 1972 and 1973 model with metal fasteners that look identical to the 68 and 69 models in material pattern. In 1974, another problem was rectified as a result of the canteen cup wearing through the nylon material. The area was reinforced with a horizontal strip. I can post photos of these covers if you'd like to see them along with the contract stamps.
  16. The contents are correct for this era.
  17. Thank you sir! I did not know that. Looked it up and learned that 5-digit ZIP Codes were introduced nationwide on July 1, 1963. Thanks again!
  18. Thank you sir! Two Gauze Bandages, 3" x 10 Yards, were also in this group. The boxes are identical in size. One is made by American White Cross Labs, Inc.; the other by Parke-Davis. I've confirmed that both manufacturers provided medical supplies to the US military during WWII. I would like to confirm that these are WWII military issue.
  19. Thanks Quartermaster! I appreciate it! I ran across a first aid or survival kit on this forum that had a small bottle of wp tablets in it but I cannot locate it again.
  20. I've had the same questions regarding this matter, and, like you, I could find no information on the net. It would stand to reason that the following items would have replaced the WWII components in the M-2 First AId Kit: Dressing, First Aid, Stock No. 2-017-455 as a replacement for the WWII Dressing Stock No. 9208200 Abbot Labs Halazone Tablets dated Aug / Sept 1950 as a replacement for the 1940's Abbot Labs issue.. Iodine vial, Stock No. 1-235-110 as a replacement for the WWII issue Iodine Vial Stock No, 9111800. I've found nothing on the upgrade for the M-2 from the 1940's to the 1950's.
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