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Patriot

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Posts posted by Patriot

  1. I hit the local flea market this morning, and lo and behold I purchased these from one vendor (generally a junk dealer). She said that they all came out of one estate, but they all seemed to be named to different people.

     

    1st Marine Division - L.P. Blein

     

    1st Marine Division - G. B. Hettinger (this one looks promising) & J Boyd

     

    5th Marine Division - J. F. Brooks

     

    6th Marine Division - Unnamed

     

    Are these even researchable?

     

    post-2801-0-66968800-1401637547.jpg

  2. I liked seeing the US soldiers during the fall of the Philippines wearing M1 helmets (should have been M1917A1) and HBT utilities (should have been khaki shirts & trousers).

     

    The mistakes with the Germans were just as bad. Since this is the US Militaria Forum, I will refrain, except to say that they were not wearing stahlhelm in 1914.

  3. I learned today that Air Force veteran and well known Civil War/militaria dealer Dale Anderson passed away. He and his wife owned Dale C. Anderson Co. for over 30 years, and had been one of the well known and respected people in the field.

     

    He will be missed!

  4.  

    it is my understanding that model 1872 cap badge would have loops on the back to secure.

     

    The Civil War hat brass insignia should have soldered brass loops on the back. Stokes & Kirk (known military supplier after the war) made early reproductions of Civil War brass insignia using the original dies. The Stokes & Kirk pieces have wire prongs instead of the loops.

  5. The season has picked up again, and this is something I found this weekend. This is a Korean War era helmet shell (swivel bail, rear seam, no cork), with a World War II Firestone liner. What is interesting (at least I think) is the paint and decal on the liner. The web chinstrap is World War II style, but has the anchor emblem on the buckle. The leather chinstrap is dried and broken, and can be seen inside the crown of the liner.

     

    What are your thoughts?

    post-2801-0-04226200-1400085701.jpg

  6. I see it here more and more.People just dont slow down.Even going by my house they will drive around 50mph.Speed limit on my street in the residential area is 20.They are normally on the phone as well.On the interstate is just nuts,Weaving in and out of traffic and not giving space to merge or slowing down to give a adequate following distance to stop or react.Seems the new norm here is people merging into traffic on a interstate from a ajacent ramp,seeing the YIELD sign means speed up and pull out in front of the oncoming traffic.Seems people want to get killed.Just hope they dont take mine for the ride with them

     

    Try riding motorcycle in this...not fun

     

    People don't realize how fast they're actually going. We have become so acclimated to driving at 65 - 70 mph that we don't stop to think about what can happen. Once you collide at that speed, it is then a matter of numbers and physics - a matter we're likely to be on the losing end of.

  7. Doyler,

     

    Yes, wartime badges were sometimes made from coins. They would polish one side flat, cut it into its desired shape, and add embellishments. There are a few examples here on the forum.

     

    Care must be used when judging the age of these badges. Aside from fakes, many corps badges are post-war veteran pieces. The example pictured here is a post-war veteran's badge, which were available for purchase through catalog, as well as at some of the larger reunions.

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