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cavsaddle

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    Hudson Valley N.Y.
  1. Kurt. Just saw this post. Very rare holster in great shape. Thanks for sharing. Best George.
  2. My research tells me that the lanyard loop was not added to the New Model Army revolver holster until after the change to russet leather around 1902.. I'm also adding photos of my Lanz, Owen holster for the SAA Colt and Smith & Wesson revolvers. Best George .
  3. Interesting manual and photo. Especially like the strap attaching the bugle. Thanks for posting
  4. Thanks for all of the input and comments on this tunic. It was purchased by me just as you see it pictured with the campaign ribbon collar brass and Lt. bars. The are no braids on the cuffs. Thanks again for the informative comments. Best George
  5. Ray, The asking price of the saddle was right around $1100. It was purchased from a good friend that I deal with a lot, so the price may be a little lower than retail. There was also a lot of trade material involved so an actual cash price would be hard to estimate. It did include all 6 coat straps and an original M1885 cinch. I would guess that a realistic cash price would be $1200-$1300. As for the M'85 headstall, if it's a true '85 with original bulls eye rosettes complete with bit in good condition and solid "live" leather, would probable go for around $700-800. It's tough to give an accurate estimate without seeing the pieces. So these will be just a ballpark figure. Hope this helps. Best, George.
  6. Just a general thought about the value of reference books. A lot of beginning collectors, myself included tend to shy away from spending money on reference books thinking that the same money could be used to purchase that next piece for the collection. What most veteran collectors eventually realize is that spending money on reference books, be it 100 or 300 dollars is a good investment in your collection. If a piece of information from a book keeps you from buying a bogus high ticket item, the money saved could easily have paid for the book. Communication with other collectors is another great way to gain knowledge. Most advanced collectors are happy to share knowledge with those new to collecting. Don't be afraid to be embarrassed about asking questions. That's how we all learned. I've been collecting cavalry saddles and equipment for well over 50 years. Not a year goes by that I don't learn something new. Lastly beware of the "expert" that knows it all. Best, George.
  7. I completely agree with the previous recommendations on reference books. I've been collecting cavalry saddles and related equipment for the past 50 years and have acquired a rather complete collection of U.S. cavalry saddles including examples of most all that were issued between 1900-1943. I would be happy to share with you any information I've gathered regarding saddles and equipment of this period. Please feel free to post any questions regarding information, photos etc. I'll do my best to answer any and all questions. Best, George.
  8. Thanks for the input. Protection while being transported makes a lot of sense. As far as the quartermaster info, just Google "history of US cavalry guidons" and click on cavhooah. Good information on guidons there. George.
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