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hawkdriver

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Posts posted by hawkdriver

  1. Zeph, I just bought a WC52 and you have given me the courage to start tearing into it and restoring it. I don't have near the amount of work you did as it is in fairly good condition, but I bought a set of map table rails and plan on blasting them and painting them to install soon. Very nice restoration you have done, I wish I had a tenth of the skill you do.

  2. Again, doubtful this is military configured, especially PJ. Why would any operator who would have to get out of an aircraft to do any tactical business have a big red "shoot me here" patch on to simply identify a rack number. Doesn't make any sense. In all the years carrying operators around the battlefield, I have never seen any wearing these vests, they wear equipment that is mouldable to their bodies so they don't jiggle. Having worn one of these for over 10 years, these vests are atrocious for anything other than sitting in a cockpit. I am thankful I never had to escape or evade wearing one of these, let alone think about an operator trying to do anything with a vest that carries very little of anything useful.

  3. That vest is the Army variant, however, I don't know what that 310 patch is for. Also, the darker flat pocket on the front is the flare pocket and it should be on he back kidney area of the vest, not on the front. The PRC-90 radio pocket should be where the flare pocket is. It looks as if this vest was repurposed. Maybe used by a wild land fire fighter or something, but that is not Army standard configuration.

  4. 2j34l68.jpg

    Sorry, I misspoke, it is not a two but a three piece cleaning rod as opposed to the four piece of the newer cleaning kits. I put a newer shorter rod on the ruler for comparison. These three piece rods are shiny, almost look nickle plated.

     

    Here are a few more pictures of the rest of the kit.

     

    fbye6b.jpg

    14k8d42.jpg

    zm1pib.jpg

  5. I remember seeing that supposedly mint yellow grenade posting. I didn't say anything at the time and I sure don't mean to upset anyone now but there are a couple things about that grenade that I find perplexing and it isn't the color.

     

    It's hard to see but it appears to me to be a solid bottom grenade body. If so it is late in the game for yellow paint. The fuse head is definitely WWII like but it has a short lever and the pull ring also appears to be the earlier thin wire pull ring.

     

    I would have to see that grenade in person to be sure of anything I've said here but that is my take on it from the picture above. It looks a bit mishmash to me.

     

    The even more obvious question, mint fresh out of the can would indicate it's a live grenade, a little on the "federally frowned on" side of the law to be posting on a public forum board. I agree with you, flat bottom doesn't go well with a original yellow painted grenade.

  6. I don't know what kind of paint you used, but it might help to use a primer first. It looks like you used Krylon paint directly on the grenade and the paint looks like it settled in pools and is starting to fill in the letter stampings. You may have more luck using something akin to school bus yellow for tint.

  7. Fantastic displays that give personality. Any update on the Korean War packs?

     

    Unfortunately, a deployment halted my cyclical cleaning and resupplying the KW packs. Hopefully this summer after the MVPA convention, I can get back on it. I will be sure to post pics. The picture here of the room is so old that I barely remember it in that configuration, I need to do a update there as well.

  8. Recently, I was finally able to secure the final major piece to my WWI collection that I have been searching for. Because this is an item that most people will never get the opportunity to see or touch, I decided to take pictures and post for reference purposes. These rations were developed as an emergency ration in the case a unit was cut off or supplies were not reaching the troops. It is comprised of bread and meat and this sample was made at the Armor Meat factory in Kansas City, ironic that KC is also the home of the WWI museum.

     

    vd1zd4.jpg

     

    21ovxu8.jpg

     

    2q172tg.jpg

     

     

     

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