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RustyCanteen

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About RustyCanteen

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    http://www.usmilitariaforum.com

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  • Location
    Earth
  • Interests
    WWII & Earlier.

    Answering posts, posting in the 'Help' & 'Suggestions & Comments' sections.

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  1. Nice uniform and restoration. This is not a common uniform, that's for sure!
  2. Yeah studios had huge costume departments back then. Some things were tailored, but many were just surplus items they used. A friend has a coat from a WWI film that had a name in it, and it turned out to be the actor that wore it (French actor playing a French Poiliu).
  3. Pretty much going to fall into a time frame from about 1955 to 1973. Cool one though.
  4. What I see is a badge with "Sterling" cast into it, overstamped partially with the Blackington name and whatever is directly above Blackington. STER[V-H] (or M-H) BLACKINGTON
  5. There are so-called 'dependent's tags' which I believe were only used at some overseas base areas in the 1950s-1960s, and I would geuss that us what you have. It isn't something I have really looked into much, but I have seen them around over the years.
  6. Keep us updated, good save.
  7. Amazing find, I knew they had their own schools but not that they published yearbooks too. That is a great piece of genealogical importance, as well as the obvious historical importance too.
  8. There was an apparently enough of a widespread problem with people wearing unearned or unauthorized ribbons in the USN/USMC during WWII, that the USN issued a directive during WWII asking commanding officers to look into ensuring men only wore the official ribbons they qualified for. Apparently some were trying to wear unofficial and unauthorized ribbons as well. The Expeditionary medal was one that was singled out, because men were wearing it apparently (erroneously) thinking they qualified for service connected to Iceland in 1941. So it could be that he had the ribbon because he erroneously thought he was supposed to have it.
  9. That truly is both a nice model, and a tribute to the original subject matter.
  10. A good episode, and if I recall correctly it was the premiere of season 2. Basically a recycled scenario from the series premiere 'Where is everybody?', about a man who wakes up in a town with no memory of who he is, and discovers that he is the only person there. Of course there is more to it, but I won't spoil the ending in case you haven't seen it. Instead of the plane as in King Nine, the 'town' features 'courthouse square' from the 'Back to the Future' movies, and other shows.
  11. Hi Ken, Thank you! 2019 ended up being a 'busy' year, but hopefully 2020 bodes well for a more relaxed pace. Regards, RC
  12. I think this dates closer to WWII than the 19th century. Eley and Kynoch were separate entities until a point, and the 'Imperial Chemical Industries Limited' would date to no earlier than the mid-1920s. From wiki "which was a founding element of Imperial Chemical Industries Ltd (ICI) in 1926. Once Nobel Industries, including Kynoch Ltd, had merged to form ICI[5], the original Kynoch factory in Witton became the head office and principal manufacturing base of the "ICI Metals Division". Kynoch, along with names such as Eley, became brands of subsidiaries." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kynoch
  13. HAPPY NEW YEAR everyone! May it be a healthy, prosperous, and of course fun one for you all.
  14. Correct on the ID, but does this photo give a regiment? Clues suggest 17th Engineers.
  15. Something is making me think UK for some reason, maybe check into that to confirm or not.
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