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Air Force Brat

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  • Location
    Yucaipa,Ca.
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    Models, knives, gear all types, paper goods.
  1. Woohoo Thank you for that info, I did a search for the month and year you posted because I hadn't been able to find exact dates before.. And it took me to a site that listed the stats. Apparently the Confederates beat the north to the punch on the draft, you were off by a year. So in April 1862, the Confederacy passed the Conscription Act" Then it gave the Union's account, The Federal government instituted its own draft a year later, in March 1863. The Enrollment Act called on men ages 20 to 45 to register for the draft. Under the Union draft act men faced the possibility of conscription in July 1863 and in Mar., July, and Dec. 1864. Draft riots ensued, notably in New York in 1863. http://civilwarhome.com/conscription.html That coincides exactly with the dates from my New York's Civil War newspapers link. So it looks like I Can document him being one of the first drafted in the Union July 1863. Hmmm I wonder if that's pertinent enough to increase the value. Maybe if I had what you have . lol
  2. I have to agree with AZNATION, the crossed cannons I can for sure tell you is artillery. I have 2 new ones from my friend who is a Maj. in the USMC, commanding an artillery unit. The pin is most definitly pre Ww2 But I've never seen one with a open circle behind it. All the ones I've seen are either just crossed cannons, or crossed cannons on like a button solid back ground. I've even seen one with a missile in between the cannons. I believe its called a cartouche. I did find one as such but it is for an armory dating to 1794.
  3. This is an interesting subject, dont worry your not hijacking I love history. I really love finding out things we believe in turns out to be mostly lies. Indeed there are quite few dedicated historians who have found this also to be true. And I cant speak for the masses but the story in my family is Thomas Jarvis came over on the Primrose 1650 or 1 or 2 landed in Boston made his way to Salem and left because of disturbances he said quakers as my family has told it over the years. Now run out of town is probably to ambiguous a phrase, he probably saw one of their shake up the town antics and moved on to Long Island New York, which is where my grandfathers family settled, they found his will in 1732. I wouldn't be surprised this version seems more accurate than Puritans leaving England for reasons of religious persecution suddenly for no reason persecuted Quakers for the same reason. Unlikely, they also have many records of Quakers seeking to come directly to Boston harbor for said conflict. http://longislandgenealogy.com/Surname_Pages/jarvis.htm
  4. Nope I meant Quakers, this was early / mid 1650's the Puritans only started in on the Quakers violently late in 1659, the ones that were just now coming over from England Those Quakers were not meek and mild innocents who just wanted to talk. They were as righteous a group of zealots as most Puritans, and when they entered a Massachusetts town they tried to wreak maximum havoc: bursting into church services, yelling in the streets, banging pots and pans together, and even stripping off their clothes (to show their lack of attachment to worldly things). The Puritans reacted with vehement rejection, and submitted Quakers who would not heed the warnings to leave and never return to terrible punishments. Boring holes through their tongues was just one of these. The Quakers, then, were a radical and alarming people who went into New England with the express mission to destroy the Puritan way and introduce their own religious beliefs. They were just as feverishly devoted to Quakerism as the Puritans were fanatically devoted to Puritanism. DO YOU KNOW HOW THEY GOT THE NAME “Quakers” because they would go into convulsive fits during their worship services.
  5. Cool, Seems like a few others were asking the same questions as me. As near as I can find the link I posted were the first conscripted. It listed info from newspapers and counties all over New York. And they were either formed into a new local unit or added to an existing one. I'm still trying to figure out when they started those draft notices. I think that was a afterthought and didnt have those initially. It would be a worthwhile thing to know. Thanks
  6. WOW, That is an awesome piece. I'm glad to see others that collect paper, theres nothing like old documents especially from that time period. I have one from upstate New York dated 1770 its very fragile but talks in part about bequeathing part of his estate to a relative valued in schillings . If you ever decide to let that go please contact me. Absolutely great find, I'd love to have that in my collection. Have you ever seen any others? It was my understanding the draft didnt start until 1862 and in NY I believe the link I posted were the first, as riots were still going on. I'm trying to find out when they started producing those notices. I dont think they did in the beginning, I thought I read initially all eligible men were to show up in the town square where the provost marshall chose on the spot. If thats true, yours might be one of the first official notices. hmmmmmm Thank you for sharing that.
  7. Yikes what a cool story, I can trace roots on my moms side to the Primrose, 1652 from England to Salem Mass. I think he (relative) was chased out by Quakers and went to NY lol
  8. I'd love to see the badge, stuff from that era makes me feel like I have gold fever. Ya until I read this I didnt know it was not only our first draft but how corrupt it was and the civil unrest it created, I read somewhere also more Americans died in the civil war than did in every war since.
  9. Well I will be attending, it will be my very first Militaria convention / show. I feel a little ashamed I'll only be driving for about 18,76 minutes not 1,876 miles. I wasn't aware this show had such international even national pull. I was always kind of a loner about my collecting. I moved a lot, but the other kids I knew growing up didnt seem to be into it. I think my collecting has been a bit different than most of you guys, it was always personal for me the stuff I held on to was about us, and Dad's career. So I have a lot of paper related things. Some more tangible things but you know, West Point cadet magazines from the 50's malmstrom minuteman newspapers, couple cool missile posters and art. even signed Thunderbirds programs, I always went to those shows. You all seem to have everything, all the uniforms patches heck I saw one vendor who had like all the actual vehicles from WW2, I wouldnt mind having an old Willies. But you all seem so focused, rather complete with your collections. Mines a bit more erratic quite a bit. As an adult I've been into WW2 stuff but nothing like you guys Well at least when I was a kid it wasn't today it all about the knives. I have a serious itch for WW2 daggers. I look forward to meeting some of you, if I can remember some names, or are we all going to put US Militaria Forum stickers on our foreheads? i.e. WW2 business cards from Hamburg, barber, nightlife, jazzband/ bar, partly in english to entice servicemen to their business, must have been during the Marshall plan.
  10. I have a masters in GIS geographic information systems, many of these acronyms stem from geospatial data layering and relatively recent applications of this science. generally GCAT would define as Global Climatology Analysis Tool But thinking this was related to Army corps of Engineering I looked there and found this. GCAT Geotechnical Criteria Applications Team This technology was designed in part with and for military applications, missile guidance, understanding the battlefield human earth relations etc.. so it's no surprise to find the Army Corps of engineers using these tools and creating teams for battlefield analysis. My guess is, since early forms were beginning in the Vietnam era he was in the Corps of Engineers. The 40th may also be a deactivated group.
  11. For $20.00 I would have bought it also. As for the Patton claim, thought I'd do some quick research and low and behold on this very site is a post and photos of Gen. Patton's helmet. Unfortunately it wasn't your photo it was from the Virginia Military Institute's museum where his helmet is on display. http://www.usmilitariaforum.com/forums/index.php?/topic/107270-general-george-s-pattons-helmet/
  12. I have always loved paper goods, of any kind. Stamps old magazines newspapers, posters, currency etc... My local collectors galleries has a weekly bid board and I saw and old cancelled check up for bid not too long ago. You know the elaborate ornate old kind. Well aside from the fact it was dated 1860 (civil war era) which I always keep an eye out for, this one was eye catching. So I bid and got it relatively cheap. It was actually a deposit slip for 500 dollars from a James D. Pickert ESQ to the bank of Ilion, herkimer county N.Y.. Did a little research on the name, turns out James D Pickert was one of the first people drafted in to the civil war. Apparently the draft was met with some violent riots since it had been found wealthy people simply paid someone else in their stead to appear and go forth. This link is lengthy but well worth the read if you are a civil war enthusiast. It is taken from local newspapers and documents about the whole process and lists James D. Pickert as one of the 50 plus conscripted because Fairfield was lacking their quota. https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/counties/herkimer/herkimer_CWN.htm
  13. I have always loved paper goods, of any kind. Stamps old magazines newspapers, posters, currency etc... My local collectors galleries has a weekly bid board and I saw an old cancelled check up for bid not too long ago. You know the elaborate ornate old kind. Well aside from the fact it was dated 1860 (civil war era) which I always keep an eye out for, this one was eye catching. So I bid and got it relatively cheap. It was actually a deposit slip for 500 dollars from a James D. Pichert ESQ to the bank of Ilion, herkimer county N.Y.. If only I could validate the 500 was cash paid to squash violent protests to the draft, which apparently was done. Did a little research on the name, turns out James D Pickert was one of the first people drafted in to the civil war. Apparently the draft was met with some violent riots since it had been found wealthy people simply paid someone else in their stead to appear and go forth. This link is lengthy but well worth the read if you are a civil war enthusiast. It is taken from local newspapers and documents about the whole process and lists James D. Pickert as one of the 50 plus conscripted because Fairfield was lacking their quota. For a set number of enlistees needed. James Pickert was listed under Fairfield as one of the 56 drawn after 201 enrolled. I believe this all took place well into the war and dated roughly between April 1882 and April 1883. https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/civil/counties/herkimer/herkimer_CWN.htm
  14. VERY NICE, I knew they had surface to surface ballistic missiles in the 50's, even nuclear tipped artillery shells. I wasn't aware they had deployed battalions for that single purpose. Awesome find, thats about as old as it gets for missileers. From what I could find looks like the 84th ART was part of the 526th missile battalion 1 stationed at fort sill the other in Germany Commonly referred to as the WAC Corporal lol cant find the logo anywhere though. Very nice find
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