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  1. Here is the P-3 aft observer seat partially restored and put back on its rails. Through helpful Navy friends I was able to obtain all the parts I need to completely restore the seat. I'd like to replace the back netting, but every former AM and AME I know who has done this has warned me that its a really difficult thing to do. Among the parts I acquired was a new cushion (installed here) and a new back net kit. The new back net would make a big difference but I really need to work up the courage to do the job as I am afraid that once I start on that there's not going to be any turning back.
  2. Yes, I was stunned to discover this, after I had purchased the seat. It came out of P-3A Bureau Number 151357, which was retired in the mid-1990s, sold, and is now sitting in a private aircraft boneyard in Tucson, AZ serving as a source of spare parts for P-3 fire bombers. This aircraft was passed around to various squadrons over the years. During the mid to late 1980s it was assigned to the VP-MAU at Brunswick, ME. This was a reserve squadron augmentation unit that was intended to provide trained replacements for the regular Navy VP squadrons on that base. Each reservist in the VP-MAU ha
  3. Here is my P-3 Orion starboard aft observer seat. Through USN contacts I was able to find all the parts I needed to completely restore this seat. Its from an aircraft, LB 04, that I actually logged time in when I was in VP-MAU Brunswick during the 1980s. At some point, when I get the courage to do so, I'd like to completely disassemble the seat and replace the back netting. I have a complete kit to do this, but everybody that I've spoken to who actually has done this told me that its a real "pain in the rump" to do.
  4. I recently acquired this starboard aft observer seat from a Lockheed P-3A Orion. The particular aircraft, Bureau Number 151357, was an aircraft that I flew while it was assigned to VP-MAU Brunswick during the mid-to-late 1980s. At that time this aircraft was designated LB 04. The seat is very special to me since I actually sat in it many time while serving as an observer on pilot training flights while a reservist with this unit. I am in the process of obtaining many parts to replace those that have worn out and have been pretty success ful so far in doing so. What I need, and am hoping s
  5. Just acquired this P-3A Orion starboard aft observer's seat. I haven't actually received it yet but it is paid for. It was removed last week from a P-3A in a storage yard in Tucson, Arizona that is being used as a source of spare parts for similar aircraft employed in fire-fighting service. I was just informed today that it has been crated up and will be shipped to me very soon. I expect to receive it within the next week or two. I would like to restore it for personal use as a chair for reading, watching TV, or working on my computer. I spent twenty years as a non-acoustic sensor ope
  6. Here are a couple of books that I edited that are composed of various "sea stories" told by members of the reserve patrol squadrons that were based over the years at NAS South Weymouth. These books were put together as a fund-raiser for the VP Association, which is an organization composed of veterans of the Naval Air Reserve patrol squadrons that were based at NAS Squantum, NAS South Weymouth, and NAS Brunswick. All proceeds from the sale of the books goes to the VP Association. You can check them out at http://www.lulu.com/shop/marc-frattasio/vp-association-sea-story-library-volume-one-vp
  7. Here is a book that I wrote about VP-92. This was a Naval Air Reserve patrol squadron that was based at NAS South Weymouth, MA and NAS Brunswick, ME. The squadron was formed at NAS South Weymouth in November 1970 out of several disbanded predecessor reserve units. The squadron operated SP-2H Neptunes until 1975, when it transitioned to the P-3A Orion. In later years the squadron also operated the P-3B and P-3C. In 1996 VP-92 relocated to NAS Brunswick, where it remained until the squadron was disbanded in 2007. Please check this book out if you are interested in military history. It
  8. Here is a book that I wrote about NAS South Weymouth, which was located in Weymouth, MA between 1942 and 1997. It started out during WW2 as an ASW blimp base but in later years took over for old NAS Squantum as the home of the Navy and Marine Air Reserve in New England. Please check this book out if you are interested in military history. It has 740 pages (its as big as the old Boston telephone directory) and has hundreds and hundreds of photos. I spent 20 years flying Lockheed P-3 Orions with the regular Navy and the Naval Air Reserve. I've always been interested in aircraft and in m
  9. Here is a book that I wrote about NAS Squantum, which was located in Quincy, MA between 1917 and 1953. This is where the Naval Air Reserve began in 1923, but there is much more to the story of this historic base than that. Please check this book out if you are interested in military history. It has 431 pages and hundreds and hundreds of photos. I spent 20 years flying Lockheed P-3 Orions with the regular Navy and the Naval Air Reserve. I've always been interested in aircraft and in military history and putting this book together was a "labor of love". I'd be interested in knowing wha
  10. This is the second insignia used by reserve patrol squadron VP-92. It was designed by squadron member Tammy Budlong in 1979 and is associated with the period when the squadron operated P-3 Orions. This same basic design was used from 1979 to 2007, when the squadron was disbanded at NAS Brunswick. This is the first version of the patch. In later years, slightly different (and smaller) variants were used. If you check elsewhere on this forum I put my collection of various VP-92 patch variants up here some time ago. I was in VP-92 myself from 1990 to 1999 and have a pretty comprehensive col
  11. In November 1970 reserve patrol squadron VP-92 was formed at NAS South Weymouth. The squadron was the result of a major reorganization of the Naval Air Reserve that had all existing reserve squadrons disbanded and replaced by new units that more closely conformed to the regular Navy squadron organizational structure, took ownership of their own aircraft, and were composed of both active duty and part time personnel. This is the first of two insignias used by the squadron and is closely associated with the period when they flew SP-2H Neptunes. It was designed by squadron member Lee Bureau.
  12. There were two Patrol Squadron Master Augment Units during the 1980s, one at NAS Brunswick, Maine and the other at NAS Moffat Field, California. The VP MAUs, as they were called, were unusual reserve units. Technically, they weren't Reserve Force Squadrons or RESFORONS, they were Squadron Augment Units or SAUs. Unlike the RESFORON VP squadrons, which would be activated as a complete unit in time of national emergency, the SAU VP MAUs were intended to provide replacements for regular Navy VP squadrons. Each reservist in the VP MAUs was assigned a mobilization billet in a regular Navy patrol
  13. After Navy Reserve transport squadron VR-62 was transferred from NAS South Weymouth to NAS Brunswick in 1996 it adopted this insignia. The squadron adopted a new motto while at NAS Brunswick, that being "The Nor'Easters". I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "naval air reserve" and you'll see them. Marc
  14. Navy Reserve transport squadron VR-62 was transferred from NAF Detroit to NAS South Weymouth in 1995 due to its former base being closed by the Base Realignment and Closure Commission. Unfortunately, the BRAC soon closed NAS South Weymouth, so VR-62 and its C-130s did not remain there for long. During the two years the squadron was at NAS South Weymouth, it used this patch with the motto "Mass Transit". The "Mass" stood for "Massachusetts". I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out
  15. Here is a patch from carrier antisubmarine squadron VS-733. This was a Naval Air Reserve unit that was based as NAS Grosse Ille. It was activated for the Berlin Crisis in 1961. Since Michigan was too far from the ocean for operational purposes, the squadron was deployed NAS South Weymouth between November 1961 and June 1962. It operated S2F Trackers. I flew P-3 Orions as a sensor operator in the Naval Air Reserve. I've written a couple of books about the Naval Air Reserve that you can check out on line at Lulu Press. Go to the Lulu Press web site and then do a search on keywords "nav
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