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trenchrat1918

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  • Content Count

    206
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Profile Information

  • Location
    Northern Michigan
  • Interests
    I am an avid collector of home front material from WW1 and WW2. I also have a strong interest in Michigan's military heritage and history.
  1. Cool flag, there seem to be quite a few handmade flags coming out of the woodwork lately. Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
  2. Wow, that jacket and tag are seriously cool. There can't be more than a handfull of these that survived and to have the pants to go with the jacket, great score.
  3. The staining made me a little hesitant to buy this flag but I couldn't pass it up, the price was right. I know the school program started on 1942 but I have not been able to find an end date in my research. My gut makes me think the school program probably continued at least into the 50's. Minimum wage in 1942 was only 30 cents so a quarter for a kid would have been quite a bit. Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
  4. The minute man Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
  5. More pictures Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
  6. Here is a flag presented to schools during the war for enrollment in war bond sales. This one is interesting because of the 5 stars on the lower corner that indicates they met the 90 percent enrollment qouta 5 times in a row. In order to earn this award 90 + Percent of the students had to be regularly buying war bonds or stamps. The flag itself was manufactured by The Valley Forge flag co and is quite large, measuring 5'x4'. The gomets are sewn. Unfortunately there is heavy staining throughout the flag which is a cotton muslin. Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
  7. Very cool pin with the engraving, I hope they all made it through. This particular sweetheart came in 2 different sizes. The larger version is almost 2 3/4" wide while the smaller lapel pin is only 3/4" across. The larger pin turns up on a regular basis but I have only seen the small size once. Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
  8. Hold my beer I've got this. By far the oddest thing in my collection are tampons in war time packaging. I did a post about these a couple of years ago. I find these really interesting, to me they show how the war affected even the most mundane parts of the home front. Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
  9. Lime island I would assume? Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
  10. Sorry, I am late to the party but I can answer your question. ASE 782 was printed in August 1945, 1095 was April 1946. For a Dday, display no.1 through 270 although 240 would actually be more believable, No.1 was printed Sep 1943, No.240 was printed in April 1944 and 270 was printed May 1944. No. 271 was printed in June 1944 and the last book 1322 was printed in June 1947. Hope this helps, Wes.
  11. They're out there, finding a nice example that isn't outrageously expensive is the hard part. Wes
  12. Here is my attempt at close ups of the restamped number. When war conservation measures went into effect some states switched from issuing 2 plates to 1. If a 2nd plate was already manufactured the extra plate was restamped and issued to the registered user in a subsequent year. Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
  13. Hello everyone, I thought some of you would like to see my latest acquisition. Here is a 1944 New York license plate. What makes this one really cool is that it was originally a 1942 plate and the 2 was restamped with a 4. Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
  14. Nice wings, the Curtis Wright wings are very common but the Sevel wings are quite scarce I believe. If my memory serves me correctly Servel switched from making refrigerators and the like to producing wings for the thunderbolt.
  15. Thank you for clearing up this mystery for me. I've had a number of S stickers over the years and couldn't find any information on them. Wes Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
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