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peter

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    the Netherlands
  1. This helmet is absolutely Dutch. It's the Model of 1953 and the shell is made by Verblifa ( Verenigde Blik FAbrieken. In Englisch: united tin factories ) I don't know who the liner's manufacturer was...
  2. Congratulations! I've read your book several times an I consider it as a great reference!
  3. I've bought one of these beautiful M1917's as well, and all I can say is: a great addition to every helmet collection! Go and get one, I'd say! Great comparison pictures, by the way ( to get back ontopic ) it clearly shows the difference between the M1917 and it's successor!
  4. Merry X-mas and a happy new year to you all! Sincerely, Peter.
  5. This liner is a bit od an oddball: Nothing special to be seen on the outside... It's the inside which is weird! Rayon webbing without the studs for the rayon headband, with OD painted steel A-washers! A really strange combination! I 've bought this liner in Belgium a few months ago. It looks authentic, however: there seems to be something with the rivets on this picture. In reality it looks less obvious and correct.. A very strange one, indeed! I've bought it for €30,- ( which is $41,- ).. Not too expensive for this strange liner, I think!
  6. Thanx for the comments, gentlemen! About the 508th.. A nice co-incidence, indeed! It is one of my most beautiful helmets, but there is more where that one comes from! A Hood Rubber Co. liner, some of its paint is gone but is has a nice used look.. ...a side view.. ..and a rear view, a NCO bar can be seen here. Original applied, however: I can't find a name or a ASN. Unfortunately.. A nice NCO marked Hood, though! And a look at the inside of the Hood liner, the webbing is torn at some spots... But all in all a nice liner if I may say so! Here another l
  7. Very nice additions to your collection! :thumbsup: Great looking liners!
  8. Please leave the set as it is! It is a piece of history en a genuine example of what the elements do to a helmet.. A great piece!! Love it!
  9. This is absolutely a very nice liner!!
  10. This is a McCord frontseam swivelbale M1 helmet, it is in a pretty rough shape but a net makes it look a bit better! A look in the inside, unfortunately the headband and linerchinstrap are missing on this liner which is an Inland liner. This liner is stripped of all of its paint but this is a lovely liner because of.. ...it's inside! This is an early rayon webbed Westinghouse liner! It is in a rough shape as well, but it is a liner with lots of history. Unfortunately not ID'd but a very nice example of a early to transitional Westy. This is a WW2 manufac
  11. Looks like a keeper to me, I like to see more pictures of this helmet! :thumbsup: Nice transitional Inland liner with a nice early wire buckled headband! Looks like a very nice aquisition! :w00t:
  12. This is a very nice Schlueter! It is of latewar mfg which can be seen by the rearseamed manganese rim and the 3 point welded chinstrap-loops, and looks defenately 100% authentic! Very nice! I love it!
  13. The 4 point chinstrap modification on the PASGT is an addition of the kit, parachutist. This PASGT is an airborne variant of the groundtroops PASGT, the kit was an addition and the troop had to place the kit into the helmet. The kit consisted of a foam pad, a velcro strap ( to be looped around the existing shinstrap ) and a long screw to be screwed into the rear A-nut. Overall: A very nice set of helmets indeed! :thumbsup:
  14. The Longest Day, it came on TV one lovely june evening, me being 8 years old. My mother allowed me to stay up late to watch the movie and I'm having an interest in WW2 and militaria ever since!
  15. Its a great movie, an unusual subject for a tragicomedy but it sure gets to ones soul! Normally I can't stand Roberto Begnini for being too loud and overacting ( Mind you, just my opinion.. ) but in this film he is "tamed" so to speak and does a great job! Love this film! :thumbsup:
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