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Cobra 6 Actual

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  1. Thanks very much ... just from your tutorial I was able to assign two different ‘mystery’ patches actual names. Much appreciated!
  2. But, the reverse is pretty strange: I’ve never seen a CIB wreath reinforced like this one. Nor have I seen that pin back style used before. If you look closely you can see where there are indentations in the metal on either end of the bar (and under the chrome) that were placed there for more standard clutch back attachments. No hallmarks, no other information.
  3. This appears to be a pretty standard looking CIB from the front:
  4. It has some similarity to volunteer fire company belts of the mid-1800’s. The parade belts are much more fancy, but this looks like more like an every day belt.
  5. Bob is the actual expert. As for the books: yes, looking at authentic Vietnam Zippos in the books is the next best thing to handling a lot of them. Ideally, you could do both. But, authentic ones are thin on the ground. And, honestly, I’ve looked at pictures in books and handled lots of authentic ones, but I’ve still been burned several times. I understand about the connection that guys have to their Zippos: pretty much everyone smoked in Vietnam. When your mortality will most likely be caused by ‘high speed lead poisoning’ from an AK-47 round, you didn’t worry too much about getting can
  6. Just to add to Bob’s comments there are usually several indicators of a fake Vietnam Zippo: 1. The location named and unit are not correct: for example, the First Infantry Division never had units at Danang, so a lighter indicating that location would be a fake. 2. Weird mis-spellings: no self-respecting GI would buy a lighter or have a lighter engraved with the word "Infantry" spelled "Infanty" ... but, I've seen that several times. I've also seen mis-spellings of base names, military ranks, etc. 3. Wobbly engraving: the letters should be crisp and the linear portions nice and
  7. I believe this is the design you’re referring to: https://www.ebay.com/itm/FIRE-SERVICE-AIR-RESCUE-WINGS-FIREFIGHTER-LARGE-LAPEL-PIN-BADGE-3-INCHES/164021135078?_trksid=p2485497.m4902.l9144 These are on eBay now, but I’m pretty sure this particular set is a reproduction.
  8. Equally probable: an MP Investigator or a CID Agent. Hair is a little long though for either of those positions, given the era.
  9. Hello, I believe this was posted earlier by a Forum member. Unfortunately, I don’t have the original post bookmarked and the ‘hotlinks’ at the end don’t seem to work. Still this should get you started until another more knowledgeable Forum member ‘answers up’: How to request Vietnam After Action Information Official Documentation may be available for your unit, unit of a friend, or the unit of a loved one. DO NOT PAY A WEB SITE FOR THIS TYPE OF INFORMATION. It is free. We recommend a personal visit to the Archives. However, if a visit is not possible, the following is SUGGESTED as a
  10. This badge was for sale on eBay recently: The seller had incorrectly assembled a two-piece CIB.
  11. Thanks, easterneagle87. Here is an additional Afghanistan-made version: This is another trade. This CIB was made in 2018 using a GEMSCO four acorn original as the template. Again, coin silver with blue lapis lazuli. Frankly, this badge is so beautifully done that I think it could pass inspection. So, not really UA. Instead a unique handmade badge.
  12. Correction, easterneagle87: I actually traded for that badge, ~2016.
  13. Thanks, seanmc1114 and easterneagle87. Always good to have photo confirmation that a badge is being worn, UA or not. Here is a CIB made in Afghanistan of coin silver and lapis lazuli:
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