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DocCollector1441

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  1. IIRC I believe they are Coast Guard Auxiliary insignia, but I could be wrong in my recollection
  2. I am not sure, but they could be chevrons for the pre-war dress blue uniform, IIRC the chevrons were usually the color of the soldier's branch of service. If they are not that then they may just be some vintage police chevrons.
  3. When my wife and I were house shopping, she wanted to have two kids (we didn't have any when we bought out first house) so I only agreed if we got a 4 bedroom house because I would need a spot for the collection.
  4. Correct the "This We'll Defend" Patch is the Drill Sergeants' insignia.
  5. Like RedLeg said helmets were stripped into pieces when turned in and generally we received them in pieces as well. During time in the Guard (2008 to 2018), I had a few helmets, some had black pads and chin straps, some had the foliage green pads and chinstrap. To CIF, its just a helmet, pads, strap, and cover so they issued whatever was in the bin.
  6. AOR2 is the pattern currently worn as a daily work uniform for all sailors. Any sailor that is deployed on ground in an environment that necessitates AOR1 would be issued those uniforms.
  7. You fold the insignia into the smallest square that has a small equal border around the insignia and then sew it on.
  8. Yes MEF is Marine Expeditionary Force https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marine_expeditionary_force
  9. Earl E. Ray enlisted 27 September 1927. He spent the bulk of his time with the USS California's Marine Detachment. Also spent time at the Guard Company Puget Sound Naval Yard and finished at Marine Barracks Iona Island. He was discharged in 1931 as a Private First Class
  10. Earl E. Ray enlisted 27 September 1927. He spent the bulk of his time with the USS California's Marine Detachment. Also spent time at the Guard Company Puget Sound Naval Yard and finished at Marine Barracks Iona Island. He was discharged in 1931 as a Private First Class.
  11. That is a beautiful uniform, I love the patch and the picture. Nice find.
  12. I was a medic and I carried multiple IFAKs so that I could treat most of the immediate casualties without having to get into my aid bag. I also carried 2 variations so that my personal IFAK was distinguishable from the others that carried more medical supplies. I cannot think of any other equipment besides maybe an admin/map type pouch that you would want to be detachable via velcro.
  13. Looks like the hook and loop part of a private purchase IFAK. A lot of the private IFAKs are velcro'd on so they can be removed and opened next to a casualty making it easier to locate the proper equipment. Mind you thats just a guess but the IFAK I carried had a similar feature.
  14. BuNav CL NO. 13-18 published on 14 January 1918 on the subject of cap ribbons is quoted below: "New cap ribbons of the following designations: 'U.S. NAVY' and 'U.S. NAVAL RESERVE' have been adopted. All men serving on regular Naval vessels including those in the Fleet, Train, and Transport Force, and at regular shore stations should wear ribbons giving the name of the ship or station, as at present. "All men serving on shore in foreign service, and on board special War Department ships or other small ships taken over temporarily, shall wear 'U.S. Navy' ribbons. "All reservists d
  15. The U.S. Navy tally was introduced during WW1 and appears to be most commonly used by sailors assigned to shore stations alongside the "US Naval Reserve Force" and "US Naval Reserve" cap tallies. The construction and shape of that cap ended in 1933 with the introduction of the "Donald Duck" cap that was worn through WWII.
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