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Zippo66

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  • Content Count

    49
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Profile Information

  • Location
    Oshkosh, WI
  • Interests
    Patches, Medals, Firearms, Military history WWII through Vietnam war
  1. This will be my 12th year attending SOS. As time goes on I'm enjoying it more every year. The first few years I was in big hurry to get in door in fear I would miss out on the good stuff. I've come to realize there is so much good stuff everywhere, the dealers can't possibly find it all before doors open. Every year, usually late on Friday or Saturday I find stunning items that 100s or even 1000s of people have walked by. One year on the 2nd day I found a mint Winchester M1 Garand all original parts brought home by vet and no arsenal marks. Another year as I was walking out of show on last day and found a stunning privately engraved fully documented USMC Silver Star grouping for action on Iwo Jima. Last year I found a documented SKS and rare WWII USMC patches. Now I slow down, take my time, visit with the dealers, talk to the vets and take it all in. I've yet to ever leave the SOS with any money left in my pocket.
  2. Unfortunately, the price of an education in military collecting is quite high for some. Engraving is a dead give away.
  3. Wow, this post made my day. First medal of this type I have ever seen. The condition is stunning.
  4. Incredible news. I met an Indianapolis survivor, "Edgar Harrell" at the SOS a few years back. I hope he and other survivors are still around to see this.
  5. This guys collection is amazing. How in the world would you be able to prevent stuff from being stolen as groups of people walk through. I would like to see the video of him firing the recoilless rifle that he said blew away half of his range berm.
  6. I wrote my representative today. What a terrible misguided and destructive bill. I hope it never sees a vote.
  7. I shot some 1960s Lake City ammo a few years ago and it shot fine although I noticed a strange sulfur smell. I had a few rounds that were duds. There use to be tons of this ammo out there in fact I think the CMP sold it maybe 5 or 6 years ago. Like all old ammunition, use common sense if you plan to use it. Inspect it before shooting. Do not use any cartridges that look corroded or damaged. At this point it's not worth much from a collectable standpoint but as this ammo dries up, that may change in the future.
  8. Unfortunately the price of an education in military collecting is high. It is unfortunate that there are so many fakers and scammers out there trying to take advantage of people. I'm thankful for this forum and the expertise of it's members.
  9. Recently, the History Channel has been airing a program about many of the civil war battles including the battle of Antietam. I believe this battle site was the large corn field featured in the program. Union soldiers were firing between the rails of the fence and from a battery along on side of the field as large groups of men were advancing through the field. This is definitely on my list of places to visit. Thanks for sharing
  10. FFZFlyers letter above is excellent! These politicians get sucked into this misguided law because they think they can score political points for standing up for veterans. The truth is that most of the purple hearts floating around are sold by the veterans families. Sadly after two or maybe three generations, uncle Archie's box of military stuff may no longer have value to every family member. HR 554 is really saying Purple Hearts are government property not the recipients. Many of the collectors are veterans themselves who research and memorialize these items. I think the impact of this law would be devastating in the loss of historical artifacts. Families will simply toss the medals instead of getting in trouble. I also worry about groupings that contain un-named Purple Hearts. In order to sell them in the future the PH would then be separated from the groups and lost to history. With over a million Purple Hearts out there, this law will be impossible to enforce. I do have hope that if he law is enacted, it will eventfully be overturned by the supreme court.
  11. I think the stars on the ribbon are a dead give away of a forgery or re-pop. On page 90 of "The Call of Duty" by LTC John E. Standberg, you can find a photo of a real Brevet medal. I cannot find any example of the stars on the Brevet and on also on MOH ever looking like this. Also the Ebay medal has a full wrap brooch which does not appear to match the brooch types shown in books. Although there were several strikes of this medal, the last strike in 1973 had silkscreened stars. The ribbon bar included with the ebay medal appears to be also 70's ish. I think it is a doctored 70's strike or some other un-authorized reproduction. I have a 1950s strike of this medal. It has sown on stars and an early crimp brooch similar to a post WWII Army commendation medal. My 2 cents.
  12. Here we go again! Wasn't the Stolen Valor Act, a similar misguided bill just ruled unconstitutional by the supreme court a little time ago.
  13. Wow, looks good enough to fool many experienced collectors. Thanks for warning.
  14. Looks good to me but definitely unusual. Pin is type seen often on British made items.
  15. Mr Paluch was very open about what happened and discussed it fully. Some times it was difficult to listen to. He was on end of line of men when firing began and dropped to ground imediatley. He survived by playing dead. He listened as men called for there mothers, and heard bayonets being stuck into people around him as germans walked through the bodies finishing off thouse still moving. I can't imagine how he wasn't haunted throughout his life, but he was just a happy go lucky person. Makes you realize how lucky we all are.
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