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Chris1917

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  1. Scott, My condolences. I lost my Dad in January, 2015, born in 1926 also. He also enlisted in 1944 and was a Coxswain in the Navy driving LCVP's in the Pacific. He was one of my best friends and I really miss him. I took my two young children (9 and 8) to Camp Butler National Cemetery near Springfield, IL last weekend to see his and Mom's grave. I ended up taking them on a tour of the entire site, showing them the markers of veterans from the Civil War to Afghanistan. My little girl was amazed at the sheer number and when she realized so many were from WWII, she asked if Grandpa knew all of these people. I said, probably not, but that they were all heroes for their service. Thanks for sharing his story. Be sure that the young ones in your family know it to. Chris
  2. I also meant to add that you can't go wrong with Mattimore boots if you want to make the investment. Great quality and a truly custom made boot.
  3. I have been very happy with my 1917 Trench Boots from What Price Glory. They fit well - ordered my size - have held up well and look great. Jerry offers a number of proper boots depending on what you are wanting. The Marching Shoes for early and 1917 and 1918 Pershing for later. The new French Model 12/16 boots look good and would work well for a US impression, too. I have always had fast shipping and great service from WPG. Good luck. http://onlinemilitaria.net/products/c164-wwi/?page=2&filter=yes
  4. Chris1917

    GREAT Obituary!

    Wow, the Greatest Generation. Looks like he was serious about everything he did! R.I.P., trooper.
  5. I don't know any members but the 90th Infantry Division out of Ohio and Pennsylvania really seems to have their act together. It would be worth checking in with them. Great website: http://90thidpg.us/index.html
  6. For your collar disc, you may want to try Repros by Ray at http://stores.ebay.com/Repros-by-Ray. From everything I have read on WWI forums, make fine quality replicas and seems to be open to special orders. I would see if he can help. I too have started using a Prairie Flower helmet for running around and doing presentations. My original 1917's are showing their age, especially my 33rd ID marked one. I wouldn't want the chinstraps and liners to come apart. Same for my other uniforms and gear. I have some Schipperfabrik and Great War Militaria stuff that looks great and I don't have to worry too much about it getting ruined when I am wearing and using it. Good luck with your impression.
  7. I have one just like it, purchased long before any repros were around. Nice condition.
  8. Everything I have gotten from Paul and Heather, uniform, equipment, web gear, raincoat is excellent. Their recent move and having a couple of the year's biggest events occur in the last month and a half combined with who now s how many orders in the works for the 100th anniversary of the Great War coming up, probably has them backed up more than usual. I would be patient. I know it's very difficult but I know they will deliver as soon as possible and you won't be disappointed. Chris Cliburn
  9. Chris1917

    THE ROOM

    This is the most AWESOME walk-in closet I have ever seen! Outstanding collection!
  10. My Dad was a US Navy coxswain on an LCVP. His ship was APA170. He always referred to being in the "Boat Division" and said they did stand watches. His battle station was his boat or in the sick bay with the surgeon when not on the boat. He said the boat crews spent a lot of tme doing duty as Shore patrol when in port but also were heavily used to transport people and material both ship to ship and ship to shore. His favorite duty, along with another coxswain, was driving the Captain's gig. Regarding the USCG, I am currently reading "D Days in the Pacific" by Ken Wiley. It is a pretty good read and I think tells the story of the boat crews and their training and combat experinces pretty well. One of the things mentioned early in the book is the Coast Guard recruiters stressing the need for small boat operators and that the USCG's experience made it perfect for the amphibious mission. Hope this all helps a little.
  11. I have one of the Sturm 1941's I purchased several years ago and it has held up well. I changed out the pea green buttons with originals (although I have read somewhere that the pea green ones were used by some WWII contractors). The only thing really wrong about the Sturm is the left-hand zipper. If you are not using it for serious reenacting, it makes a great casual jacket (I wear mine as a medium-weight coat in winter). Also, it looks like you only paid $53.00 for it shipped. That's not a bad price for the coat, you did well and will have a nice, if not "perfect" jacket.
  12. I had an old swivel bail pot with most of the finish gone that I decided to restore as a helmet my Dad would have worn. He was a Coxswain on an APA and drove LCVPs and other small landing craft. I found some photos of boat crews in the Pacific and determined that a common marking was the APA number on the back. After cleaning up the helmet, retexturing and priming, I chose a Testors "Battleship Gray" (kind of glossy) and sprayed it on. I then hand lettered his ship number on the back. When he first saw it, his eyes opened wide and he asked "Where did you get this?" I told him I made it up and he said it looked just like his except he also had his boat number on the front. I have not gotten around to adding that yet but by his reaction, it must have been pretty close to the helmet he wore. As far as other photos I have seen when looking at boat crews, the color seems to vary from what looks like standard OD to any shade of gray. When visible, hand-applied or stenciled markings usually were white and appeared on the back, front or both. My assumption is that the markings were more for the in charge of loading the boat with soldiers and the passengers themselves to make sure everyone was in the right place! Hope this helps a little.
  13. I had an old swivel bail pot with most of the finish gone that I decided to restore as a helmet my Dad would have worn. He was a Coxswain on an APA and drove LCVPs and other small landing craft. I found some photos of boat crews in the Pacific and determined that a common marking was the APA number on the back. After cleaning up the helmet, retexturing and priming, I chose a Testors "Battleship Gray" (kind of glossy) and sprayed it on. I then hand lettered his ship number on the back. When he first saw it, his eyes opened wide and he asked "Where did you get this?" I told him I made it up and he said it looked just like his except he also had his boat number on the front. I have not gotten around to adding that yet but by his reaction, it must have been pretty close to the helmet he wore. As far as other photos I have seen when looking at boat crews, the golor seems to vary from what looks like standard OD to any shade of gray. Hand-applied or stenciled markings usually were white and appeared on the back, front or both. My assumption is that the markings were more for the in charge of loading the boat with soldiers and the passengers themselves to make sure everyone was in the right place! Hope this helps a little.
  14. Tyler, Awesome photo!!! Reminds me of shots of my Dad in 1945. Like the others have said, it is great seeing a "kid" that really looks the part. keep up the great work. You are setting a new standard. Chris
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