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SFMike

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  • Location
    midwest
  • Interests
    History, old bikes, black powder, other neat stuff.
    Retired civil service.
    SF RVN Vet 68-70 A-Team Puke.
    SFTG '67.
  1. I ran this by a bunch of old timers on a SF forum. Guys from old 10th, White Star, A Teams, Mike Force and Projects. All time periods. Nobody can ID an A200. The tag is unknown by guys who ought to know. It is something not recognized. Poster did say he would expound on this. 2 Corps SF organizations have a 2 prefix, from C2 down to A 322, etc. 2 Corps mike force went to that designation in 1967 and had A 201 and 202. Not actual A teams, but formations in the fashion of conventional units with SF NCOs as company commanders, XOs, Platoon Leaders, etc. The troops were a form of CIDG. The guy in the pic is probably known by one of us or listed in Sherman's work. We are interested in these things and discuss them and people involved at great length. We would just like to know what A 200 is. Mike force was not organized into things like "Mike Force Camp A200." That is a forgiveable error.
  2. There are about a dozen old time SF from 46th Company, Mike Force, Projects, White Star, and actual A-Teams anxiously awaiting information regarding existence and location of A-200. That number does not compute. Anything with designation 2 would be from c-2 In 1967, 2 Corps Nike Force was designated B-20 and subordinates were A-201 and A-202 though they were not actual A-Teams.
  3. That's my story and I'm stickin' to it.
  4. Here's a few I dug out. Blue and green was thought up by the CO of C-3 or "A" Company in 1969. He began addressing himself as "The Professional" and everybody else as "The Professionals." These were sent to the A Teams along with a trimmed .50 cartridge for a fastener. B-Teams as well. I think B 36 prolly kept their old one. Red and blue was a general camp or team scarf particular to my camp. Red and Yellow was a bit later and the Blue tip signified recon platoon. It has been worn quite a bit by yrs truly. There is another without tips for everybody else in the camp. Mine is tucked away at the farm. We basically ignored the one from company, though if we went back on a chow run or steam and cream, we tucked it in a pocket. They could get pretty silly about this stuff. There was a SGM at Nha Trang whose job was to look under your shirt to see if you were using a purloined cargo strap for a belt. Good for an artical 15 at the time. The Air Force had reported a shortage and we were considered likely suspects. They were not real good belts, either. Mine has shrunk.
  5. I think only about 300 odd, triple CIB wearers existed. I knew a couple of them, gone, now.
  6. My father was at Dachau-we used to have pics, but they are lost. He reported seeing this stuff being carried out and burnt over several days. There is only one unit in military history that is correctly identified as "Special Forces." The term has been quite muddied in recent times by folks unclear on the subject.
  7. Classic "last ditch" with wooden butt plate, straight bolt knob, fixed rear sight and no rod. Many of these were snatched unissued from arsenals. Number on bolt root should match reciever. Nice complete souvenir outfit.
  8. You get a CIB in SF, regardless of branch. Medics used to get a choice of CMB or CIB. Rank and service are issues. The Colonel was too high in rank to get a CIB. Forget the cutoff, Major, possibly. Also he probably never saw any ground combat. Group Commander is the head SF guy in country. A CIB is not an attendance award.
  9. I have all the respect in the world for the old timers. I didn't want to be disrespectful in case he has memory related issues. I began harassing local veterans in my teens in the early 60s looking for souvenirs and stories. Then, after my own experiences, I just enjoy the stories for what they are and leave it at that. After a while you will hear variations of the same story, even conflict to conflict. That makes you think. There are guys who are outright frauds and liars-free country. Couple groups I belong to like to bust hose guys, but it all getsold after a while. Sad is a guy who has told his family really outrageous tales and they put them in his obituary. I don't believe in bothering them over it, but some jerks will.
  10. There are veterans who will blow smoke up your butt for as many reasons as you can think up. Some of them are now senile and don't know what they are saying. It is your choice as to believe as much of it as you like. Does his 214 or whatever they called it then give inclusive dates of service with ovewrseas time, etc? Do the math.
  11. All 5th Group officers were required to wear ARVN rank insignia just as all of us were required to wear the LLDD patch on our pocket. There were guys who had extra or second pieces of clothing or headgear that never got worn or were only used in the rear. Berets worn every day in the field or camp got grungy. The shape is sure not going to stay the same after 50 years of storage Officers were expected to maintain the usual STRAC Airborne uniform standards when not on actual operations. Enlisted as well. The spitshine, starch and whitewalls are part of being in such a unit and are a giant pain in the rear.
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