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mconrad

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  1. 44th Division, a New York and New Jersey organization, around 1925. I don't know the unit insignia, but it looks the same on everyone.
  2. Grouping of related 2nd Army photos, probably from 1942-43, judging by the M1 helmet and campaign hat. I like how that one guy can switch from summer to winter without missing a beat.
  3. My rule of thumb for CAC is that later rather than sooner for M1902 dress uniforms. The CAC was last in line for 1902 dress uniform coats and I have seen many CAC photos with the M1902 hat but pre-1902 dress coats. So instead of "around 1904 or so", I would haphazardly say "around 1910 or so."
  4. http://www.military-historians.org/company/plates/images/663.htm has the Company of Military Historians' plate for the NY Vols in Hawaii. https://dmna.ny.gov/historic/reghist/spanAm/infantry/1stInf/1stInf_Span-Am_Article_Stenzel.pdf has a photo of a mess line in which a couple of the men are in the brown fatigue uniform.
  5. I don't think the Gazette would have his commission or promotion since he was in the American army, not British. I do think the Gazette would have his award citation from the British army, though.
  6. Hard to believe that this Airman is part of a CCT supporting the patch unit. I hypothesize that he is assigned to a Army hospital, and supporting the CCT just for the tactical exercise. I don't know the medical establishments in Panama at this time, for instance if Howard AFB had its own AF hospital or was under an Army establishment on the other side of the canal on the Army bases. Gorgas?
  7. Hard to believe that this Airman is part of a CCT supporting the patch unit. I hypothesize that he is assigned to a Army hospital, and supporting the CCT just for the tactical exercise. I don't know the medical establishments in Panama at this time, for instance if Howard AFB had its own AF hospital or was under an Army establishment on the other side of the canal on the Army bases. Gorgas?
  8. Is that a German photographer in the background? Funny if we're seeing the Germans document their own surrender.
  9. In 1910, the several NG full-dress regimental uniforms that were not regular Army regulation were expensive, highly distinctive, and used by units that were well placed both financially and socially. Hard to believe there was a unit going to the trouble of a regimental uniform based on a obsolete Army pattern that was pretty darn plain and mundane. And those purple chevrons with the blue light infantry bugle! Try to explain those! I agree with the previous post from KurtA - most likely a military school. Is the sizing appropriate for a youth?
  10. Much thanks for collecting the knowledge, and spreading the knowledge, and lastly preserving the knowledge
  11. These I had trouble believing they were Ohio NG. Now I think they are also Polish-American Sokol.
  12. That's funny. I thought that by regulation the blue uniform was not worn in Hawaii and the Philippines. No denying the photo stamp for Fort Shafter, though.
  13. On the back writing of the first photo, isn't SOKOL falcon in Polish?
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