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Spathologist

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  • Location
    Hill Country, Texas
  • Interests
    US Cavalry edged weapons.

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  1. Oh, wow! That is awesome! I used to fly fire spotting on the Fort Hood ranges, saw all kinds of neat stuff but I never had the brass ones to land and pick some of it up...
  2. Well, if you're done farting around with those fingernail picks, you can start acquiring real steel...
  3. You'd need: Guard Metal blade washer Ferrule Pommel Left and right grip panels Panel screws (2) Guard/pommel connector (usually brazed to the guard) Pommel screw. And a scabbard. A leather washer if you really wanted to go full monty.
  4. Beautiful, well-made holster, but...you have to put your finger inside the trigger guard to draw?
  5. Butt-forward was all there was for revolvers until the new holsters were made in 1942. He was probably wearing a M1909 or M1917.
  6. Holsters were worn on the right side, saber/sword on the left, and revolver holsters were butt-forward. The US Army didn't issue a butt-rear revolver holster until 1942.
  7. None of them were left-hand draw. Some were right-hand butt forward "Cavalry draw", and some were right-hand butt rearward.
  8. Looks like the Brit lanyard I got with a Webley.
  9. It's hard to visualize your predicament, but... There's a screw on the back of the pommel. It holds the entire saber together, minus the grip panels which have their own screws. Unscrew the two grip panel screws, remove the grip panels. Remove the screw at the end of the pommel, remove the end of the guard from its socket at the back of the pommel, and everything should slide out to the rear. You may need to encourage it a little with a wood or rubber mallet.
  10. I can't remember ever seeing one marked, other than those with Boyle, Gamble, & McFee cast in the guard. This guy might offer some insight:
  11. I stand corrected...the earliest is 1935, on a L-A marked as "Sportsman/US Army/American Made". I couldn't make out the last number of the year in the inscription, so I'd filed it as 193X, but looking at the officer's record it was a gift from his NCOs on his last day as a first sergeant before being commissioned, 7 Feb 1935. Given the early date in 1935, they were likely sold at least as early as 1934.
  12. If you buy a letter for that M1917, it will tell you which depot it was shipped to and when.
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