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WW2 leather flight gear


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#1 brandon_rss18

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 12:20 PM

Hey guys, I have some WW2 AAC leather flight gear pieces such as jackets, trousers and flight helmets that are a little dry. I was wondering if any of you think that it would be a good idea to have them professionally leather conditioned. And when I say professionally thats what I mean, lol, that is all this guy does, mostly cowboy boots and such but has been doing it for over 40 years. What do yall think? Thanks guys, Brandon.

#2 Bob Hudson

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Posted 03 February 2009 - 12:53 PM

I think that doing boots is really quite different than working with and preserving vintage leather items that are more than half-a-century old. There are some good articles online about leather preservation and the general rule seems to be to not do anything unless absolutely necessary. There is a good article directly related to military leather: http://www.garciaavi...m/conserve.html -

#3 brandon_rss18

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 02:07 AM

I think that doing boots is really quite different than working with and preserving vintage leather items that are more than half-a-century old. There are some good articles online about leather preservation and the general rule seems to be to not do anything unless absolutely necessary. There is a good article directly related to military leather: http://www.garciaavi...m/conserve.html -


Thanks FS, seems I am not going to mess with them at all! Ill just keep them out of direct sunlight or any UV. Thanks again, great article.

#4 Shenkursk

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 04:55 PM

I am not going to mess with them at all! Ill just keep them out of direct sunlight or any UV.


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#5 Tom @ Snake River

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Posted 04 February 2009 - 10:34 PM

By all means, keep it away from the cowboys, their cure-all is usually neatsfoot oil and saddle soap, which is fine for what they are doing.

I am also stareing at a vintage flight suit. It sits and collects dust on a manaquin. I would suggest first vacuming with a fine brush on the end of the hose. Or use a fine brush and a slight amount of compressed air to get the dust and dirt off.
So far, I am not convinced of what treatment if any to put on a flight suit.

#6 RTS

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Posted 08 February 2009 - 09:32 AM

Ditto on avoiding the neatsfoot oil and saddle soap. Lexol is the way to go, you can find them at most auto parts stores...you'll need the
brown and orange bottles, follow the instructions on the bottles very carefully and text before you treat whole pieces. A friend who has
done museum restoration in the past swears by dilligently applied Lexol for leather. He says that neatsfoot oil and saddle soap can do
more harm than good in causing dryrot in stitching and reacting with some leather processes.

Edit to add: If a treatment becomes necessary-I heartily agree with the other posters who are endorsing the keep out of the sunlight and
handle as little as possible idea.

Edited by RTS, 08 February 2009 - 09:33 AM.



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