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#1 316th FS 324th FG

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 03:49 PM

All,

The official history for the 64th Fighter Wing shows an EMEA ribbon with campaign stars and an invasion arrowhead. Would the pilots supporting an invasion receive invasion credit and thus be entitled to the arrowhead? Or did you literally have to come ashore on the beachhead within a specified time. These guys would have supported the early 44 invasion of Italy and the Aug 44 invasion of Southern France.

Thanks

D

#2 swabbie

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Posted 20 August 2008 - 07:00 PM

I’d like to hitchhike on this question. I have a group to a career Army nurse whose ETO ribbon has the invasion arrowhead (and three bronze stars). Her lengthy obit states that she participated in the Omaha landing (6 June 44) and was authorized the arrowhead. A week ago, I sent an inquiry to the Army’s Office of Medical History asking when the first Army nurses “hit the beach” and if she might have been authorized the arrowhead by supporting the landings, taking care of the wounded aboard a hospital ship. No answer yet. Do any of you have some additional information with regard to these questions?
Thank you

#3 bigredone

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Posted 22 August 2008 - 12:44 PM

Someone doesn't have to be in the actual higgins boat to get the arrowhead. Or be shot at to get the star. I think it has to do with time of service and general location. They may be assigned on a division level.

Somebody who went through Normandy (or Hurtgen Forest) should get a medal. And maybe a new car.

I’d like to hitchhike on this question. I have a group to a career Army nurse whose ETO ribbon has the invasion arrowhead (and three bronze stars). Her lengthy obit states that she participated in the Omaha landing (6 June 44) and was authorized the arrowhead. A week ago, I sent an inquiry to the Army’s Office of Medical History asking when the first Army nurses “hit the beach” and if she might have been authorized the arrowhead by supporting the landings, taking care of the wounded aboard a hospital ship. No answer yet. Do any of you have some additional information with regard to these questions?
Thank you



#4 usmedalman

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 08:27 AM

The award of the Arrowhead device is governed by AR600-8-22, The current edition of that reg states:

The arrowhead is a bronze replica of an Indian arrowhead 1/4-inch high. It denotes participation in a combat parachute jump, helicopter assault landing, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing, while assigned or attached as a member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. A Soldier must actually exit the aircraft or watercraft, as appropriate, to receive assault credit. Individual assault credit is tied directly to the combat assault credit decision (see para 7–25) for the unit to which the Soldier is attached or assigned at the time of the assault. Should a unit be denied assault credit, no assault credit will accrue to the individual Soldiers of that unit. It is worn on the service and suspension ribbons of the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign, Korean Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal and the Global War on Terrorism Expeditionary Medal. Only one arrowhead will be worn on any ribbon.

To be certain of the regulations at the time, a copy of the WW2 era regs should be consulted.

#5 JBFloyd

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 11:17 AM

From the Army's history of the Medical service in the ETO:

"The first field hospitals came ashore on 7 and 8 June, the 13th and 51st at OMAHA and the 42d and 45th at UTAH, bringing with them the first Army nurses to enter the beachhead."

#6 TAMU97

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 01:16 PM

To add to the discussion regarding what qualifies for an arrowhead, my grandfather landed on Omaha on D+6 as a replacement officer and was assigned as the platoon leader for 2nd Platoon, E/26 about a day later (so that would have been 13 June 1944 when he actually took command). He was authorized a bronze arrowhead for his participation in the invasion, although he did not step ashore until nearly a week later.

So once again, checking the appropriately dated AR to determine eligibility would be the way to go.

#7 316th FS 324th FG

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 01:34 PM

So, from TIOH:

A bronze arrowhead is worn on the ribbon to indicate participation in a combat parachute jump, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing within the EAME Theater.

I guess I have some digging to do to find out why the 64th FW History shows the EAME ribbon with an arrowhead. Although now that I think about it, I believe at least some individuals in various subordinate units did land on the beaches, and thus be entitled to it. But the pilots would not have been.

#8 TBMflyer

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 01:52 PM

I'm pretty sure that the only aviators entitled to the arrowhead are Glider Pilots, although I have seen it worn by C-47 crews who flew the paras in on D-Day. Mark

#9 Guest_william_*

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 02:58 PM

MY FATHER WAS WITH THE NINTH INFANTRY DIVISION, LANDED AT UTAH BEACH D+7 AND THE 9TH WAS NOT GIVEN THE ARROWHEAD.
I WAS TOLD THAT THEY HAD TO BE IN THE MAIN ASSAULT, JUNE 6.
THE NINTH WAS CREDITED WITH THE NORMANDY INVASION AND GOT A BATTLE STAR BUT NO ARROWHEAD .
THEY RECIEVED ONE FOR THE INVASION OF NORTH AFRICA. ENDED UP WITH EIGHT BATTLE STARS AND ARROWHEAD.

#10 seanmc1114

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 05:03 PM

It denotes participation in a combat parachute jump, helicopter assault landing, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing, while assigned or attached as a member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission.

When and under what circumstances has the arrowhead been authorized for a helicopter assault landing? I don't think that regulation was in effect during Vietnam where you would probably be hard pressed to find a combat infantryman who hadn't participated in at least one helicopter assault. Maybe it was during Operation Desert Storm when the 101st Airborne conducted a division-sized helicopter assault at the beginning of the war. I've just never heard of it being awarded for a helicopter assault.

#11 edgeer

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Posted 26 August 2008 - 11:50 PM

When and under what circumstances has the arrowhead been authorized for a helicopter assault landing? I don't think that regulation was in effect during Vietnam where you would probably be hard pressed to find a combat infantryman who hadn't participated in at least one helicopter assault. Maybe it was during Operation Desert Storm when the 101st Airborne conducted a division-sized helicopter assault at the beginning of the war. I've just never heard of it being awarded for a helicopter assault.



I've got a pdf copy of AR 600-8-22 (Personnel-General Military Awards) dated: 11 December 2006

it states:

5–9. Korean Service Medal

d. The arrowhead device is authorized for wear on the KSM to denote participation in a combat parachute jump,
helicopter assault landing, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing, while assigned or attached as a
member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. Additional information on the arrowhead
device is in paragraph 6–9.

5–13. European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal

d. The arrowhead is authorized for wear on this medal to denote participation in a combat parachute jump,
helicopter assault landing, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing, while assigned or attached as a
member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. (The arrowhead is described in para 6–9.)

5–14. Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal

d. The arrowhead is authorized for wear on this medal to denote participation in a combat parachute jump,
helicopter assault landing, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing, while assigned or attached as a
member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. (The arrowhead is described in para 6–9.)

6–9. Arrowhead
The arrowhead is a bronze replica of an Indian arrowhead 1/4-inch high. It denotes participation in a combat parachute
jump, helicopter assault landing, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing, while assigned or attached as a
member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. A Soldier must actually exit the aircraft or
watercraft, as appropriate, to receive assault credit. Individual assault credit is tied directly to the combat assault credit
decision (see para 7–25) for the unit to which the Soldier is attached or assigned at the time of the assault. Should a
unit be denied assault credit, no assault credit will accrue to the individual Soldiers of that unit. It is worn on the
service and suspension ribbons of the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign, Korean
Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal and the Global War on Terrorism
Expeditionary Medal. Only one arrowhead will be worn on any ribbon.

7–23. Assault landing credit—Arrowhead device

a. Assault landing credit (award of the bronze arrowhead) may be made to units of the Army who, in the combat
zone of a battle, campaign, or expedition as established by Joint Chiefs of Staff or DA, accomplishes one of the
following types of assault operations:
(1) Makes a parachute jump into enemy-held territory as a part of an organized force carrying out an assigned
tactical mission.
(2) Participates in the assault waves of an amphibious landing on enemy-held territory.
(3) Makes a helicopter assault landing into enemy-held territory as a part of an organizational force carrying out an
assigned tactical mission.

b. The assault operation will be of such scope as to warrant DA designation as a battle or campaign and be of such
magnitude as to include tactical elements of at least one other Service. The forces committed should be spearheading a
major assault into enemy controlled territory. The operation will be such that the committed forces will ultimately
control the area in which they have landed and not rely on immediate link-up with other forces or extrication after a
hit-and-run type of mission. Day-to-day combat assault type missions in an already established combat zone do not
qualify for award of the arrowhead device. For the individual Soldier to receive award of the arrowhead, the Soldier
must physically exit the aircraft or watercraft during the assault landing.
c. Senior Army commanders, serving in the rank of LTG or higher, in the theater of operations may approve combat
assault landing credit for the purpose of qualifying for the arrowhead device. This authority may not be further
delegated.

#12 Wailuna

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 12:16 AM

...The official history for the 64th Fighter Wing shows an EMEA ribbon with campaign stars and an invasion arrowhead. Would the pilots supporting an invasion receive invasion credit and thus be entitled to the arrowhead? Or did you literally have to come ashore on the beachhead within a specified time. These guys would have supported the early 44 invasion of Italy and the Aug 44 invasion of Southern France...

...but getting back to the original question about assault landing credit for 64th Fighter Wing in WWII: What actually did this unit do to earn this recognition?

64th_FW_cover.jpg

The USAF Historical Research Agency might know (link here).

#13 439th Signal Battalion

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 04:14 AM

[b][quote name='Wailuna' date='Aug 27 2008, 04:16 AM' post='187492']
...but getting back to the original question about assault landing credit for 64th Fighter Wing in WWII: What actually did this unit do to earn this recognition?

Wailuna,

I'm glad that I happened to stumble across your post. My grandfather, S/SGT William G. Honeycutt, was a signal team leader (MOS 238, Lineman Telephone & Telegraph) in the 439th Signal Construction Battalion (Aviation), which was under the direct operational control of the 64th Fighter Wing from 1943-1945.

The battalion's #1 priority in the ETO was to quickly establish and provide reliable communications between the fighter-bombers of the 64th Fighter Wing, XII Tactical Air Command and ground units of the 5th and 7th Army's, although most of the time the 439th trailed the 45th Infantry Division from Salerno, Italy, to Dachau, Austria.

To try and answer your question about the assault landing credit, there were several smaller support units within the 64th Fighter Wing, namely signal and communications, such as the 439th and 582nd SAW, that participated in nearly every campaign in the ETO from Operation Torch and Arzew Beach on November 8, 1942 until the German surrender in 1945.

Although the 439th was considered a support unit and not combat arms, they saw their fair share of combat while performing their duties.

B Company of the battalion spent over a month dug in and under almost constant enemy fire at Anzio from 22 January 1944 until being replaced in March. At several places in their tour through Africa and Europe, several linemen had the unpleasant experience of being suspended 20ft. or more on telephone poles and getting strafed at by passing Luftwaffe planes bombing Allied positions or shot at by German patrols and quite a few of the battalions personnel were killed and wounded from mines, artillery, and small-arms fire.

The service record for the 439th Signal Battalion speaks for itself: Algeria-French Morocco, Tunisia, Sicily, Naples-Foggia, Rome-Arno, Northern France, Southern France, Rhineland, and Central Europe.

Did the unit actively participate in all of these campaigns? Yes and no. The unit functioned like orphans as the battalion was rarely together as a whole, with the HQ section and A/B Companies going wherever they were needed. In 1944, the 64th Fighter Wing was transferred from the 12th Air Force to the 9th Air Force.

Two assault landings were also credited to the unit for landing on D-Day at the Salerno Beachhead and St. Tropez in Southern France. At tenth campaign and third bronze arrowhead should have been awarded to them for Anzio, but since B Company landed and participated there while HQ and A Company did not, that honor was denied as the unit as a whole did not participate.

I hope this helps to answer your question.

Regards,

R. Gouge

PS-I have also been slowly working on a generic website about the 439th at
http://signal439.tripod.com/

Hopefully, all of the links and images are working. Take a look at it when you get the chance.

#14 Gregory

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 06:39 AM

Hello,

A very interesting theoretical discussion. http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif

In the context of this post...:

A Soldier must actually exit the aircraft or watercraft, as appropriate, to receive assault credit.


...very interesting is this post:

I'm pretty sure that the only aviators entitled to the arrowhead are Glider Pilots, although I have seen it worn by C-47 crews who flew the paras in on D-Day.

Looks like the USAAF had their rights to arrowheads without "exiting" their aircarft.

Best regards

Greg

#15 316th FS 324th FG

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 11:27 AM

439th,

Thanks, that is exactly what I was looking for and helps explain it. I believe some of the 324th FG (also part of the 64th FW) ground crew also went ashore in Southern France in the invasion, but not as a group, so no arrowhead for them.

D

#16 Wailuna

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 12:24 PM

...Looks like the USAAF had their rights to arrowheads without "exiting" their aircarft...

I am skeptical, Greg. The Army was very stingy with WWII assault landing credit and I doubt that many USAAF flying units were granted this recognition, with its strong implication of ground combat. Army units that earned WWII assault landing credit were confirmed in War Department General Orders and the record is compiled in the Army's Unit Citation and Campaign Participation Register (allowing for the usual errors and omissions). USAAF flying units were systematically omitted from the Register, which was published in 1962, (presumably by mutual agreement of the Army and the USAF). Consequently, 64th Fighter Wing is not listed in the register, whereas 439th Signal Heavy Construction Company (Battalion?) is and the 439th has been credited with two assault landings: Salerno and Southern France (see Post #13 above). As the standard reference does not cover USAAF flying units, it is inconclusive on the question, however, better document has yet to be presented here: Show me the paper.

Edited by Wailuna, 30 August 2008 - 12:25 PM.


#17 Gregory

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 01:13 PM

I am skeptical, Greg. The Army was very stingy with WWII assault landing credit and I doubt that many USAAF flying units were granted this recognition, with its strong implication of ground combat. Army units that earned WWII assault landing credit were confirmed in War Department General Orders and the record is compiled in the Army's Unit Citation and Campaign Participation Register (allowing for the usual errors and omissions). USAAF flying units were systematically omitted from the Register, which was published in 1962, (presumably by mutual agreement of the Army and the USAF). Consequently, 64th Fighter Wing is not listed in the register, whereas 439th Signal Heavy Construction Company (Battalion?) is and the 439th has been credited with two assault landings: Salerno and Southern France (see Post #13 above). As the standard reference does not cover USAAF flying units, it is inconclusive on the question, however, better document has yet to be presented here: Show me the paper.

Thanks Wailuna -- as always :)

But... do not you think that the aircrews of the C-46s or C-47s towing the gliders or dropping the paras meet the definition of "exiting of their crafts" during invasion if they were forced to abandon their planes after hitting by enemy's fire?

One more theoretical question... http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/think.gif ;)

Best regards

Greg

#18 Wailuna

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Posted 30 August 2008 - 06:12 PM

...do not you think that the aircrews of the C-46s or C-47s towing the gliders or dropping the paras meet the definition of "exiting of their crafts" during invasion if they were forced to abandon their planes after hitting by enemy's fire?

Before venturing to hypothesize on this subject, here's one more matter of fact for you to consider:

Credit for participation in various campaigns and assault landings accrued to units, not directly to individuals. The confirming WD General Orders mentioned earlier designated the units to receive the credit. Individual soldiers were not named. Once unit designations were made, it was a function of the Army's personnel officers to annotate records of soldiers assigned to cited units with their appropriate campaigns and assault landings. I am sure will foresee many difficulties with this system (and there were many, indeed) but that is for another time. The important fact for this discussion is that only the soldiers actually assigned to a cited unit were entitled to assault landing credit.

Okay, hypothetically, what about those troop carrier air crews who ended up in combat on the ground, deliberately or not, during WWII airborne and glider assaults? By-the-book, they would be entitled to assault landing credit only if their parent unit were cited but not otherwise. Were USAAF troop carrier squadrons awarded WWII assault landing credit? I don't know. USAAF units are mainly excluded from the Register mentioned above and this is the only readily accessible reference that I know of. However, I would not be surprised to learn that troop carrier units that participated in the assaults received the credit, which then would have extended to the crews, as you surmise.

#19 Wolfhounds

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 02:18 PM

I've got a pdf copy of AR 600-8-22 (Personnel-General Military Awards) dated: 11 December 2006

it states:

5–9. Korean Service Medal

d. The arrowhead device is authorized for wear on the KSM to denote participation in a combat parachute jump,
helicopter assault landing, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing, while assigned or attached as a
member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. Additional information on the arrowhead
device is in paragraph 6–9.

5–13. European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal

d. The arrowhead is authorized for wear on this medal to denote participation in a combat parachute jump,
helicopter assault landing, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing, while assigned or attached as a
member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. (The arrowhead is described in para 6–9.)

5–14. Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal

d. The arrowhead is authorized for wear on this medal to denote participation in a combat parachute jump,
helicopter assault landing, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing, while assigned or attached as a
member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. (The arrowhead is described in para 6–9.)

6–9. Arrowhead
The arrowhead is a bronze replica of an Indian arrowhead 1/4-inch high. It denotes participation in a combat parachute
jump, helicopter assault landing, combat glider landing, or amphibious assault landing, while assigned or attached as a
member of an organized force carrying out an assigned tactical mission. A Soldier must actually exit the aircraft or
watercraft, as appropriate, to receive assault credit. Individual assault credit is tied directly to the combat assault credit
decision (see para 7–25) for the unit to which the Soldier is attached or assigned at the time of the assault. Should a
unit be denied assault credit, no assault credit will accrue to the individual Soldiers of that unit. It is worn on the
service and suspension ribbons of the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign, Korean
Service Medal, Vietnam Service Medal, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal and the Global War on Terrorism
Expeditionary Medal. Only one arrowhead will be worn on any ribbon.

7–23. Assault landing credit—Arrowhead device

a. Assault landing credit (award of the bronze arrowhead) may be made to units of the Army who, in the combat
zone of a battle, campaign, or expedition as established by Joint Chiefs of Staff or DA, accomplishes one of the
following types of assault operations:
(1) Makes a parachute jump into enemy-held territory as a part of an organized force carrying out an assigned
tactical mission.
(2) Participates in the assault waves of an amphibious landing on enemy-held territory.
(3) Makes a helicopter assault landing into enemy-held territory as a part of an organizational force carrying out an
assigned tactical mission.

b. The assault operation will be of such scope as to warrant DA designation as a battle or campaign and be of such
magnitude as to include tactical elements of at least one other Service. The forces committed should be spearheading a
major assault into enemy controlled territory. The operation will be such that the committed forces will ultimately
control the area in which they have landed and not rely on immediate link-up with other forces or extrication after a
hit-and-run type of mission. Day-to-day combat assault type missions in an already established combat zone do not
qualify for award of the arrowhead device. For the individual Soldier to receive award of the arrowhead, the Soldier
must physically exit the aircraft or watercraft during the assault landing.
c. Senior Army commanders, serving in the rank of LTG or higher, in the theater of operations may approve combat
assault landing credit for the purpose of qualifying for the arrowhead device. This authority may not be further
delegated.



I know this is an old thread, but I just came across this and I too was puzzled because I had never heard or read about an Invasion Arrowhead for the Vietnam Service Medal. I read and understood this post, however I am curious about what major operations the Arrowhead would have been awarded for in the Army in Vietnam. If day to day credit in an already established combat zone did not meet the criteria for this device, which operations did?

I sure Operation Junction City and with the 173rd being the only major Airborne would have received an Arrowhead for this jump, but which Army Divisions and what Operations did qualify for the award of the Arrowhead?

Any info would be appreciated, Thanks

#20 Stinger Gunner USMC

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 08:04 PM

I know this is an old thread, but I just came across this and I too was puzzled because I had never heard or read about an Invasion Arrowhead for the Vietnam Service Medal. I read and understood this post, however I am curious about what major operations the Arrowhead would have been awarded for in the Army in Vietnam. If day to day credit in an already established combat zone did not meet the criteria for this device, which operations did?

I sure Operation Junction City and with the 173rd being the only major Airborne would have received an Arrowhead for this jump, but which Army Divisions and what Operations did qualify for the award of the Arrowhead?

Any info would be appreciated, Thanks

I dont know about other units but this is from the www.173rdairborne.com website
1.7 Assault landing credits
a. DAGO 48, 1971, as amended by DAGO 8, 1979 announced award of assault landing credits to participating units in an airborne assault in the vicinity of Katum, Republic of Vietnam, between the hours of 0900 and 0907, inclusive 22 February 1967. The arrowhead is authorized for wear on the Vietnam Service Medal for this assault landing in Vietnam.

#21 Wailuna

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Posted 17 February 2009 - 11:07 PM

...I dont know about other units but this is from the www.173rdairborne.com website...

The airborne landing at Katum evidently was the Army's only Vietnam War operation to earn assault landing credit. Here are extracts from the Unit Citation and Campaign Participation Credit Register (DA Pam. 672-3, Jan. 29, 1988. Link here):

Paragraph 7, page 1:

Assault landing credits

a. DAGO 48, 1971, as amended by DAGO 8, 1979 announced award of assault landing credits to participating units in an airborne assault in the vicinity of Katum, Republic of Vietnam, between the hours of 0900 and 0907, inclusive 22 February 1967. The arrowhead is authorized for wear on the Vietnam Service Medal for this assault landing in Vietnam.

Participating units:

HHC, 173rd Airborne Brigade (element)

2nd Battalion., 503rd Infantry

H&S Battery, 3rd Battalion, 319th Artillery (element)

Battery A, 3rd Battalion, 319th Artillery (element)

Troop E, 17th Cavalry (element)

173rd Engineer Company (element)

Company A, 173rd Support Battalion (element)

16th Signal Detachment (element)

172nd MI Detachment (element)

19th Tactical Air Support Squadron (USAF)



#22 Wolfhounds

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 05:22 PM

I dont know about other units but this is from the www.173rdairborne.com website
1.7 Assault landing credits
a. DAGO 48, 1971, as amended by DAGO 8, 1979 announced award of assault landing credits to participating units in an airborne assault in the vicinity of Katum, Republic of Vietnam, between the hours of 0900 and 0907, inclusive 22 February 1967. The arrowhead is authorized for wear on the Vietnam Service Medal for this assault landing in Vietnam.



Thanks for the info. I'll try to look around the web a little and see what I can find. Going through this thread last night that was the 1st time I'd ever heard about an arrowhead device for the VSM. I'm just curious to see what other Army units received the arrowhead besides the 173rd. Thanks again, Sean

#23 Wolfhounds

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 05:23 PM

The airborne landing at Katum evidently was the Army's only Vietnam War operation to earn assault landing credit. Here are extracts from the Unit Citation and Campaign Participation Credit Register (DA Pam. 672-3, Jan. 29, 1988. Link here):

Paragraph 7, page 1:

Assault landing credits

a. DAGO 48, 1971, as amended by DAGO 8, 1979 announced award of assault landing credits to participating units in an airborne assault in the vicinity of Katum, Republic of Vietnam, between the hours of 0900 and 0907, inclusive 22 February 1967. The arrowhead is authorized for wear on the Vietnam Service Medal for this assault landing in Vietnam.

Participating units:

HHC, 173rd Airborne Brigade (element)

2nd Battalion., 503rd Infantry

H&S Battery, 3rd Battalion, 319th Artillery (element)

Battery A, 3rd Battalion, 319th Artillery (element)

Troop E, 17th Cavalry (element)

173rd Engineer Company (element)

Company A, 173rd Support Battalion (element)

16th Signal Detachment (element)

172nd MI Detachment (element)

19th Tactical Air Support Squadron (USAF)



Thanks for the info, that is something I was curious about. Sean

#24 f16chief

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 08:53 PM

I thought this might be of interest to this posting. I actually got this off of e-bay a while back and the seller had zero information on the original owner. Too bad, it a great Ike though. The 64th DI's are unmarked screwbacks and the ribbon bar is English made I believe. What exactly the green around the patches means I dont really know. Any help or reference would be great.

HPIM3755.JPG

#25 f16chief

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Posted 18 February 2009 - 08:53 PM

HPIM3756.JPG


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