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7.62 mm Ammunition Cans

Started by NamHelmet , Feb 18 2012 06:19 PM

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#1 NamHelmet

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 06:19 PM

Just for grins, I wanted to know anything and everything you guys know about this ammo can. Do any of the markings indicate a year?

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#2 NamHelmet

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 06:20 PM

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#3 NamHelmet

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 06:20 PM

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#4 NamHelmet

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 06:21 PM

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#5 Gunny

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 06:47 PM

Its a M19A1 Ammo Box.

The post war .30 caliber Ammunition box is known as the M19A1. It measures 3-13/16 x 7-1/4 x 11. Adopted in 1946 the M19 series had officially replaced the M1 and M1A1 boxes by the early 1960's. The M19A1 box started out as a .30 caliber box but after 1957 it was also adapted for use with 7.62mm NATO ammunition. The box has a rubber gasket and a removable lid. The sides of the lid of the M19A1 are similar to the type found on early M2A1 boxes. The M19A1 has National Stock Number (NSN) 8140-00-828-2939. The drawing number is 7553315.

Deja vu' for me, handled many of them in my lifetime...

#6 m1ashooter

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 11:20 PM

Maybe Jan 66 for the ammo lot number.

#7 Tanker1

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 07:58 AM

Just a tid bit that you most likely already know, the M73 MG was the tank coax machine gun on M60 series tanks and updated M48s. The M73 was a pain and tankers hated it. The 3rd try with this gun was called the M219 (73X3). The M73 was also mounted in pairs on that armored car the MPs used in Nam.

#8 NamHelmet

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:28 AM

Maybe Jan 66 for the ammo lot number.


That's what I was thinking too. The isolated "70" towards the right was my second guess for a 1970 date.

#9 NamHelmet

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:30 AM

Just a tid bit that you most likely already know, the M73 MG was the tank coax machine gun on M60 series tanks and updated M48s. The M73 was a pain and tankers hated it. The 3rd try with this gun was called the M219 (73X3). The M73 was also mounted in pairs on that armored car the MPs used in Nam.


Wow, I didn't know that about the M73. Thanks for the info. What kind of armored cars did the MPs use? I'm surprised they didn't just use Mutts.

Edited by NamHelmet, 19 February 2012 - 10:30 AM.


#10 Tanker1

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 10:54 AM

In the 67-68 time frame the road MPs used jeeps with added armor plates and the V100 armored car by Cadillac Gage for convoy escort. They had to account for rounds at their coastal base, so they would stop by our firebase to pick up 7.62 ammo, which tankers did not have to account for.

#11 45ACP

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 05:44 PM

The army called it the XM706 or M706 Nicknamed the "Commando".

#12 NamHelmet

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 06:28 PM

The army called it the XM706 or M706 Nicknamed the "Commando".


That's a cool vehicle! I found a picture on the web.

So to confirm, the can indicates a 1966 date? Do you guys think this can may have been used to supply a vehicle? Or is there NO WAY to know?

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Edited by NamHelmet, 19 February 2012 - 06:28 PM.


#13 Tanker1

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 08:09 PM

The tank coax M73 did not feed from this ammo box. Ammo was removed from the box, linked belt to belt and layered into a big turret mounted box we called a "banana box" that held about 3,000 rounds, that fed the coax. Also had additional boxes mounted to the turret floor to hold belted 7.62. We removed the belts and tossed the cans. Might use a couple to keep some our valuables dry or store stuff. I do not know how the armored car guns were fed.

#14 patches

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 11:44 PM

Yes, the date is January 1966, the can would be used to carry Ammo for the M60 Machine Gun, this was it primary use, these can's could be mounted on vehical mounted M60 MGs if they use the older pintle mount that had the tray/shelf to hold the ammo box.

#15 NamHelmet

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 10:54 AM

Yes, the date is January 1966, the can would be used to carry Ammo for the M60 Machine Gun, this was it primary use, these can's could be mounted on vehical mounted M60 MGs if they use the older pintle mount that had the tray/shelf to hold the ammo box.


Thanks Patches! That is the "meat" of what I wanted to know. ;)

#16 DiGilio

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 12:12 PM

Id say this can is from 1970. The "70" number is how I always dated these. The 1-66 is a lot number on this can. This can is also consistent with the style of later cans. Around 1967 is seems they changed the markings and the lid a little.

Edited by DiGilio, 20 February 2012 - 12:13 PM.


#17 NamHelmet

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 01:15 PM

Here's some more for your analysis: http://www.usmilitar...p;#entry1029369

#18 NamHelmet

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Posted 20 February 2012 - 01:17 PM

Id say this can is from 1970. The "70" number is how I always dated these. The 1-66 is a lot number on this can. This can is also consistent with the style of later cans. Around 1967 is seems they changed the markings and the lid a little.


It very well could be. I thought there was a correlation between the lot number and the year but perhaps not? Hmm.

#19 45ACP

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Posted 21 February 2012 - 06:51 PM

The onr with the turret is even cooler looking. I believe that version is the Air Force one.
http://www.warwheels...m706e1WISE4.bmp

That's a cool vehicle! I found a picture on the web.

So to confirm, the can indicates a 1966 date? Do you guys think this can may have been used to supply a vehicle? Or is there NO WAY to know?


Edited by 45ACP, 21 February 2012 - 06:56 PM.



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