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#26 Greg Robinson

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 07:29 AM

The Browning M2 .50 machine gun, the M1918 BAR, and the M1911 service pistol are all tied for being my favorites. I've fired all three of them.

Greg



If being fun to operate makes it a "favorite" weapon then I'd like to amend my list to include the flame thrower and M79 grenade launcher. But I still say the BAR is the absolute BEST so long as you didn't have to carry to far. Darn thing weighed about 20 lbs and that doesn't include all those loaded magazines.

#27 USMCRECON

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 07:44 AM

I have an Arisaka Type 99, toyo kogyo arsenal, with the Chrysanthemum ground off. Looking for a bayonet for it that isn't wildly overpriced (seen them for $175 and up...is this what they actually sell for, or just over-ambitious sellers? Anyway, the Arisaka is definitely a decent bolt-action, worthy of praise. Not quite a 1903 or a M1 Carbine though!


I have a couple Arisakas but I'm not really all that fond of them beyond their value as collector's items - they finish my set.
One is the standard Type 99 7.7mm rifle and the other is the short 6.5mm cavalry/paratrooper(?) carbine with the folding bayonet. Both still have the Chrysanthemum on the receivers and the stamped sheet metal dust covers over the bolts.

The rifle is in really nice condition (a reletave term with the poorly-finished war model Arisakas) with probably 95% of the "bluing" remaining (bluing is in quotes because it's really a clunky almost flat black finish) and a nice bright orange-brown stock. The only thing missing is the bayonet and the silly little wire monopod. I've seen several bayonets on eBay rather frequently but haven't tried to bid on one yet. What I'd really like to find is the wire monopod to replace the missing one on the rifle.

The carbine looks like it originally had nicer metal finished parts but some of the finish is worn off and the stock has turned a vary dark brown.

#28 Ricardo

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 08:00 AM

Hi All,

- Small arms: M1911A1 and CZ-75
- Long arm: Garand

Best regards,

Ricardo.

#29 Bank Vault

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 08:13 AM

I didn't expect any guy who has spent much time around full autos to be fond of the Arisakas :lol: . I don't know about yours but the last thing you want is me shooting at you with mine, I have a natural feel for it, but there will always be a soft spot in my heart for my bolt actions. Dang the Arisaka feels natural? Oh no I'm re-encarnated Japanese http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/hapy0004.gif http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/hapy0003.gif

I have a couple Arisakas but I'm not really all that fond of them beyond their value as collector's items - they finish my set.
One is the standard Type 99 7.7mm rifle and the other is the short 6.5mm cavalry/paratrooper(?) carbine with the folding bayonet. Both still have the Chrysanthemum on the receivers and the stamped sheet metal dust covers over the bolts.

The rifle is in really nice condition (a reletave term with the poorly-finished war model Arisakas) with probably 95% of the "bluing" remaining (bluing is in quotes because it's really a clunky almost flat black finish) and a nice bright orange-brown stock. The only thing missing is the bayonet and the silly little wire monopod. I've seen several bayonets on eBay rather frequently but haven't tried to bid on one yet. What I'd really like to find is the wire monopod to replace the missing one on the rifle.

The carbine looks like it originally had nicer metal finished parts but some of the finish is worn off and the stock has turned a vary dark brown.


Edited by Bank Vault, 14 September 2007 - 08:13 AM.


#30 Fox

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 08:14 AM

Actually, I never had any occasion to shoot with another firearm than a .22 carbine, so far.

However, what I consider as one of the best WWII rifles is the British Lee-Enfield N4 mk I. As far as pistols are concerned, the German Luger P08 looks pretty nice, doesn't it? :lol:

#31 USMCRECON

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 08:29 AM

If being fun to operate makes it a "favorite" weapon then I'd like to amend my list to include the flame thrower and M79 grenade launcher. But I still say the BAR is the absolute BEST so long as you didn't have to carry to far. Darn thing weighed about 20 lbs and that doesn't include all those loaded magazines.


Hi Greg. The M-79 certainly wasn't a bad weapon either as long as one had someone to back them up when reloading.

When I first got to Vietnam, I was issued an M-16 - one of the "brand new" ones with the forward bolt assist device. On the first day of my very first patrol we made contact with a squad of NVA. We had left the LZ and were climbing the finger of a ridgeline. When we stopped to listen for a while and rest, as the FNG I was sent back down the trail as a rear point listening post. I was sitting in the brush alongside the trail with my back up against a tree when the NVA trackers walked right up on me. They hadn't seen me and I engaged them with the M-16; it fired one round and failed to extract. I then picked up the dropped AK to engage the rest of them until my buddies began returning fire from up the hill. So much for confidence-building re. the M-16.

After my second patrol, the M-79 gunner rotated home and I volunteered to carry that. I thought an M-79 that fired when the trigger was pulled was more desirable than an M-16 that didn't. It only took a short while to learn how to aim it effectively; we never used the sights - in fact, I taped it down to the Bbl to keep it from rattling and it was fired somewhat like a mortar. See the picture below. This picture was taken before my first patrol as the M-79 man....yes, those are several bandoleers of 40mm HE rounds draped over my belt. This was in the days before the handy grenadier vests and I liked to keep them readily accessable. In the end, though, it was not the best solution and I ended reverting back to wearing only 2-3 bandoleers around my waist and put the rest in my rucksack.

The Army and Air Force had shotgun rounds for the M-79 but they were not available in the Marine supply line but I was able to make a trade with the Air Force SP supply guy at Danang AB; a captured Tokarev pistol for a box of shotgun rounds - seemed like a good deal to me! With a 40mm shotgun round in the M-79, I often ran point on patrol. I would (hopefully) get off the first round, then drop to my knee to reload while the back-up point fired over my head with his M-14. I carried the M-79 until I took over the M-60/Stoner MG......Sorry, I didn't mean to go into another dissertation and apologize for the length of this post.

By the way, until I left Nam in Jun 68, we were continually authorized one M-14. Since there was no grenade launcher cartridge available for the M-16, we used the need for that capability as the rationale for keeping one M-14.

Me_with_M_79.jpg


Edited by USMCRECON, 14 September 2007 - 08:42 AM.


#32 USMCRECON

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 08:38 AM

I didn't expect any guy who has spent much time around full autos to be fond of the Arisakas :lol: . I don't know about yours but the last thing you want is me shooting at you with mine, I have a natural feel for it, but there will always be a soft spot in my heart for my bolt actions. Dang the Arisaka feels natural? Oh no I'm re-encarnated Japanese http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/hapy0004.gif http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/hapy0003.gif


I dunno....I found the action on the Type 99 to be a bit "catchy" and not very smooth (the carbine is a little better than the rifle). I think two of the smoothest bolt-actions I've felt are my 1916 Swedish Mauser carbine and my Krag carbine. Both of those have actions that are about as smooth as butter.

#33 Manchu Warrior

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 08:48 AM

At one time in the active army I was a crew member on a M113 and I had to qualify on all the weapons systems on the track. The funnest, is that a word?, weapon I qualified on and ever fired was the MK 19 automatic grenade launcher. What a blast this weapon was I was laughing hysterically the whole time. http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/w00t.gif

#34 Fox

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 09:06 AM

Sorry, I didn't mean to go into another dissertation and apologize for the length of this post.


Geeee... Kind of impressive. I wouldn't have thought there were so many vets right here, particularly from Nam, in which I'm quite interested. This is very amazing to read your message. It makes me feel very, very small... Definitely impressive.

Thanks for that testimony,

Fox

#35 USMCRECON

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 09:26 AM

Geeee... Kind of impressive. I wouldn't have thought there were so many vets right here, particularly from Nam, in which I'm quite interested. This is very amazing to read your message. It makes me feel very, very small... Definitely impressive.

Thanks for that testimony,

Fox


Hi Fox. It wasn't all that impressive, just survival and doing aa job that needed doing; and it was a long time ago. My post was certainly not intended to be boastfulor to make anyone feel small. Everyone is important in this world and everyone has a job to do in life. Doing it well, no matter what it is, should make everyone feel proud and good about themselves.

#36 Jeeper704

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 10:57 AM

It sure is interesting reading about the experiences.
Thanks.

Erwin

#37 Bank Vault

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 09:41 PM

I love talking to Vietnam vets about Vietnam, something about the whole mess makes me wish I could've gone but the past is the past and the future is now. I agree that the action could use a little work on the Arisaka but I am a deadly shot with it once there is a round in the chamber. I picked up a M1895 Russian Nagant revolver today and will test it tomorrow, this baby is almost new with probably 200 shells or better for 230. Any expirence with this weapon anyone?

#38 ronl

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Posted 14 September 2007 - 09:52 PM

I love my Garand and it just "feels" right, but my favorite is the M-14. I have an M1A1 Super Match that is an absolute tack driver. Last time out I put two .30 bullets in the same hole and decided that was good enough for me. Needed some practice with the AR-15 anyway. My favorite pistol is my Sig 229 in .40 S&W. I have an original '43 Colt 1911 A-1. I can't hit much with it. It was Lend Leased to the British in WW2 and worth a bit too much to run rounds through.

#39 Fox

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 08:23 AM

Hi Fox. It wasn't all that impressive, just survival and doing aa job that needed doing; and it was a long time ago. My post was certainly not intended to be boastfulor to make anyone feel small. Everyone is important in this world and everyone has a job to do in life. Doing it well, no matter what it is, should make everyone feel proud and good about themselves.



I'm sure you're telling the truth, but I cannot prevent myself from being impressed by that kind of things - you know, all in all I'm just a kid and being admirative is logical when you never knew combat. I'm not saying war is great (my family suffered from WWII), I just mean that the men who take part in it sometimes deserve real respect, and in my opinion those who went to fight in Vietnam do deserve it.

Regards,

Fox

#40 Bank Vault

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Posted 15 September 2007 - 09:17 AM

I am not the best shot with my 1911 US Army model made in 1918 either, but if someone breaks in my house I can give them 8 rounds of remington golden saber 230 grain quicker then they can blink

I love my Garand and it just "feels" right, but my favorite is the M-14. I have an M1A1 Super Match that is an absolute tack driver. Last time out I put two .30 bullets in the same hole and decided that was good enough for me. Needed some practice with the AR-15 anyway. My favorite pistol is my Sig 229 in .40 S&W. I have an original '43 Colt 1911 A-1. I can't hit much with it. It was Lend Leased to the British in WW2 and worth a bit too much to run rounds through.



#41 USMCRECON

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 03:41 PM

After 40 years of talking to guys about infantry weapons I've come to the conclusion that the Stoner system was outstanding, the M60 was an excellent MG, the M14 was a reliable rifle, and the M16 was a problem although it did improve with the adoption of the A1 modifications. And everybody trusted the M1911/M1911A1 service pistol.

I qualified with the M14 at Parris Island in 1967, thought it was a fine rifle, and if I'd been sent to Viet Nam it would have been my choice over the M16/M16A1 and I understand individual Marines were still carrying M14's up until the late '60's.


I forgot to add a comment related to carrying the M-14 well after adoption of the M-16. This is not a personal experience but it comes from a very close Marine buddy who was a Platoon Leader in 3/5. He went over with the Battalion and came home between Operations Union-I and II. He said that they had so much trouble with the M-16 that they pressured their Company Commander to get the Battalion Commander to order reissue of the M-14s. To his credit, he went to bat for them and got their M-14s back.

Edited by USMCRECON, 19 September 2007 - 03:42 PM.


#42 Greg Robinson

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 04:35 PM

I forgot to add a comment related to carrying the M-14 well after adoption of the M-16. This is not a personal experience but it comes from a very close Marine buddy who was a Platoon Leader in 3/5. He went over with the Battalion and came home between Operations Union-I and II. He said that they had so much trouble with the M-16 that they pressured their Company Commander to get the Battalion Commander to order reissue of the M-14s. To his credit, he went to bat for them and got their M-14s back.


I have a question, were the M14's that were carried by Marines in Viet Nam configured for select fire? I know this was a relatively simple modification so assume it was done over there since the M16 had this capability.

Greg

#43 Gutkowski

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 05:01 PM

Mine are the same as most
the M1 Garand and the 1911A1
Question for all that are serving or who has served I see that Fulton Armory ship's their private purchase M14 over and I was wondering if you could ship over any other weapons to use in action ?

#44 one50

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Posted 19 September 2007 - 06:07 PM

My Favorite US rifle (since this is a US site http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif ) is the U.S. Model of 1917 and my pistol would be U.S. Army Model 1917 Colt. Something about that year.

But of course I would never give up any of my Imperial Japanese stuff :D

#45 USMCRECON

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Posted 22 September 2007 - 11:05 AM

I love talking to Vietnam vets about Vietnam, something about the whole mess makes me wish I could've gone but the past is the past and the future is now. I agree that the action could use a little work on the Arisaka but I am a deadly shot with it once there is a round in the chamber. I picked up a M1895 Russian Nagant revolver today and will test it tomorrow, this baby is almost new with probably 200 shells or better for 230. Any expirence with this weapon anyone?


The only Russian handgun I've handled is the Tokarev semi-auto (including Chinese copies). Over the course of my tour in Vietnam, we probably collected 5-6 of them in the field. We didn't have much use for them as a personal weapon but they made great material for trading, along with SKS rifles, with the Air Force Air Police supply Sgt at Danang AB for boxes of the camouflage jungle utilities they wore to guard the base but the Marines couldn't get through their supply chain.

Edited by USMCRECON, 22 September 2007 - 11:06 AM.


#46 USMCRECON

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Posted 22 September 2007 - 11:18 AM

I have a question, were the M14's that were carried by Marines in Viet Nam configured for select fire? I know this was a relatively simple modification so assume it was done over there since the M16 had this capability.

Greg


We didn't have any M-14s that were not equipped with the selector; the default setting was normally "rock and roll." As I remember, it was simply a matter of knocking a drift pin out of the nub on the right rear of the receiver, removing the nub (cover) and replacing it with the selector lever. All in all, about a 2-minute deal.

I never saw it done except for occasional cleaning of this area, though, since all of ours were fitted with the selector well before I arrived in country.

#47 Greg Robinson

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 02:43 AM

We didn't have any M-14s that were not equipped with the selector; the default setting was normally "rock and roll." As I remember, it was simply a matter of knocking a drift pin out of the nub on the right rear of the receiver, removing the nub (cover) and replacing it with the selector lever. All in all, about a 2-minute deal.

I never saw it done except for occasional cleaning of this area, though, since all of ours were fitted with the selector well before I arrived in country.


Yep...this is why the BATF catagorized the M14 as a "Class III" weapon. Very few are in the hands of civilians. Converting it to select fire, once you had the parts, was no big deal. I only got to fire the M14 on full auto one time and I remember they were hard to hold on target...the muzzle was prone to start climbing.

#48 USMCRECON

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 07:25 AM

Yep...this is why the BATF catagorized the M14 as a "Class III" weapon. Very few are in the hands of civilians. Converting it to select fire, once you had the parts, was no big deal. I only got to fire the M14 on full auto one time and I remember they were hard to hold on target...the muzzle was prone to start climbing.


Yes, the muzzel did climb on full auto.

Any rounds that went over the enemy's head were wasted rounds. I only carried the M-14 in combat a few times (a couple when we did not take the M-60 and a couple others when the normal point man was on R&R or sick) but, if I had time to think about it before firing (usually after the first burst, which was more reflexive), I would turn the rifle sideways a bit so that it would climb more horizontally than vertically. You couldn't use the sights then but, in the close-in combat we normally engaged in, the sight was not really necessary and it was more of a point-and-shoot deal.

Edited by USMCRECON, 23 September 2007 - 07:26 AM.


#49 Greg Robinson

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Posted 23 September 2007 - 09:55 AM

Yes, the muzzel did climb on full auto.

Any rounds that went over the enemy's head were wasted rounds. I only carried the M-14 in combat a few times (a couple when we did not take the M-60 and a couple others when the normal point man was on R&R or sick) but, if I had time to think about it before firing (usually after the first burst, which was more reflexive), I would turn the rifle sideways a bit so that it would climb more horizontally than vertically. You couldn't use the sights then but, in the close-in combat we normally engaged in, the sight was not really necessary and it was more of a point-and-shoot deal.


There was a letter posted in "American Rifleman" magazine recently from a WW2 Marine paratrooper. He was issued one of the Reising Guns that had the folding stock and had such a lousy reputation. In his letter this guy said his always worked and he compensated for the bad muzzle climb by turning it sideways, just as you did.

#50 DM1975

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Posted 25 September 2007 - 12:52 PM

I am glad they got all the problems fixed on the M16. I carried an M16A4 the first time I went to Iraq and an M4 the second time and they were deadly reliable. I also own an XM16E1 and an M16A1 and they work great too, but then again, that is at the range, not Vietnam :) I am sure environment has a lot to do with it, among other things. I also had an M14 that we converted over to a sniper rifle because we didn't have enough M24's to go around. Great battle rifles but I cant stand shooting one that is scoped.


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