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Duck Hunter & Mitchell Pattern Helmet Covers


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#26 deros

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Posted 17 January 2007 - 02:02 PM

I think I am happy that while it is a practice that has photographic provenance it was a minority thing and as such I will not be seeking to replicate it.

#27 BEAR

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 10:40 AM

The vast majority of MPs in Vietnam were involved in "installation defence". They would patrol major bases and local cities and villes. The headgear they wore were for the most part, were black painted helmet liners that had a white "MP" on the front and horizontal band of white, red, red and white or red and blue. They also had unit insignia on each side. These helmet liners were designed to stand out and be easily recognized by military and civilian personnel.
The MPs also did field duty in the form of convoy escort and field command HQ defence for major combat units in the field (assigned MP units). While in the field they wore steel pots and camouflage covers. Most camouflage covers did not have the "MP" attached however there were exceptions and it really depended on the unit SOP(standard operating procedure).
Here are two pictures I found on the net. I have digitally enhanced the close up to show the helmet cover.
These were dated 1967-68.
These photos were found at this website: http://www.members.t...e7/england.html

Harder to see this one but it's there. could not enhance this one due to poor quality photo. Interesting note ... the stockless M1 Thompson. Possibly a war trophy? You will also note that the "MP" does not stand out as black letters normally would in black and white photos. This possibly suggests that the letters may be an olive drab material.
BEAR

Edited by BEAR, 18 January 2007 - 10:46 AM.


#28 BOB K. RKSS

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Posted 18 January 2007 - 01:41 PM

The "VC" did have Thompsons, U.S. Carbines, & French weapons. Shoulder stock just unscrews from Thompson. Firearms were collected off "VC" bodies; after We kicked their a**; in TET 1968!

Edited by BOB K. RKSS, 18 January 2007 - 01:42 PM.


#29 Jason G

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Posted 19 January 2007 - 08:24 AM

Helmet_cover_MP.jpg
Here is the Helmet cover that I have in my collection. I got it, with about 5 more (since sold or traded, long gone) in the late 1980's or so. This one is obviously worn and well used. No documentation of it being worn/used in Vietnam, but the markings are not poorly done, and are on both sides of the cover.


Reverse_MP.jpg

MP on the reverse as well.

Cover_Helmet_Camouflage__Contract_No_8189_8415_261_6833.jpg

Cover Helmet Camouflage
Contract No. 8189
8415-261-6833

On_Helmet.jpg

How it looks (quickly) put on a helmet.

#30 rayg

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 04:19 AM

I have a 2nd pattern camo cover with the slots around the crown for foliage and also the single slot in each finger/ear.

Just curious, what was the purpose of the slot in the finger/ear?

#31 Andrei

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 04:50 AM

Hi !

Here is my USMC cover. It is adorned with graffitis for a Marine helicopter unit, HMM-262 plus name of the owner and hometown.

Andrei

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  • USMCcover1.JPG


#32 Andrei

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 04:55 AM

The other side.

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  • USMCcover2.JPG


#33 Andrei

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 04:58 AM

Front graffiti.

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  • USMCcover3.JPG

Edited by Andrei, 29 January 2007 - 04:59 AM.


#34 Andrei

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Posted 29 January 2007 - 05:01 AM

Close up of the name and unit.
Could you tell me what pattern:model is this cover ?

Cheers,
Andrei

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  • USMCcover4.JPG


#35 Schnicklfritz

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Posted 30 January 2007 - 01:53 PM

Hi,
The helmet cover is the 1st pattern USMC cover devoloped in WW2. The unit is HMM-262, standing for Helicopter, Marine Medium, Squadron 262. They mostly use the CH-46 helicopter for support, but also have Cobras and Huey copters. They are currently based in MCAS(H) New River last I knew. I was with HMM-264 for a short time. The cover was mostlikely used in VietNam. Hope that helps!
Cheers!
Marc Shaffer

#36 Andrei

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Posted 30 January 2007 - 02:12 PM

Hey Marc !

Thanks for your infos on my helmet cover.
Cheers !

Andrei

#37 rayg

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 05:56 AM

I posed this question in the post on these covers earlier but it probably got lost in the many threads so here it is again. What was the purpose of the button or slit holes in the fingers/flaps of the 2nd pattern camo cover, Anyone? Ray

#38 craig_pickrall

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 06:11 AM

Ray, I have seen that question posed before but I don't recall ever seeing an answer.

In the hopes of getting some discussion started I'll throw out a couple of guesses.

It may have been intended to be laced inside the helmet to hold it in place.

Possibly it was intended to be worn outside the helmet in the back to provide sun protection and camo to the neck area. The button holes would provide a tie off spot to secure the cover to the uniform to keep it from riding up. I have seen pics of the cover worn in this manner but not laced to the uniforn.

#39 Bagman

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 10:04 AM

My guess---and it is no more than that---is that the button holes in the flaps may have been used as a way to pull the cover over the helmet evenly and give it a nice taut appearance. Run a drawstring (shoelace ???) through the button holes, add a half hitch, and pull the drawstring ends until the cover is nice and evenly snugged down over the helmet. Remove the drawstring and insert the helmet liner into place.

A new cover might have been a very tight fit and consequently a bitch to pull over the rough-textured helmet evenly. And we all KNOW how the Marines wanted everything squared away appearance wise!!

In fact, a friend of mine in my Marine Corps living history unit had a GREAT deal of trouble getting a new repro cover onto his helmet because it was such a tight fit. Perhaps the same problem was anticipated when the original covers were spec'd in 1942.

Like I said, just a guess...and I doubt that such a procedure would ever have actually been used.

Bagman

#40 craig_pickrall

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 10:24 AM

Bagman that is an interesting theory.

One possible reason your friend had trouble getting a new repro cover over his helmet may be that the WW2 helmet is slightly larger than the Vietnam era helmets. If the manufacturer made their repro covers to a late issue pattern then they would be a little small for a real WW2 helmet.

#41 Greg Robinson

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Posted 06 February 2007 - 11:26 AM

Me thinks we're making this too complicated. :D

The flaps were designed to be worn hanging loose to break up the outline of the helmet. This was sometimes, but not commonly, done. And the extra slit in each flap was simply another attachment point for camouflage foliage. It was later deemed unnecessary and dropped on later patterns.

Greg

#42 rayg

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Posted 07 February 2007 - 04:39 AM

Me thinks we're making this too complicated. :D

The flaps were designed to be worn hanging loose to break up the outline of the helmet. This was sometimes, but not commonly, done. And the extra slit in each flap was simply another attachment point for camouflage foliage. It was later deemed unnecessary and dropped on later patterns.

Greg


:D Me thinks you're probably right. That's what the slits on the crown were for so it just follows that the slits on the flaps would be used for the same, Ray

#43 TSgt Mackey

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 09:05 AM

MP helmets were heated up and a can of high gloss black paint was poured over the helmet an then when the paint cured the decals were afixed onto the helmet or painted on. This information was given to me by an old vietnam MP

#44 VALERY

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 11:45 AM

Bonjour,
I bought many years ago at the Paris flea market (Marché aux puces for your next trip in France ;) ) a Mitchel helmet cover with typical locally made MP letters among normal helmet cover. In fact it's the near the same than Jason G's.
If MP in VN were involved in Physical security and police missions they were involved too in direct combat missions (the 18 th MP Bde was assigned between 1967 and 1970 a tactical Area of Responsability in the south of Long Binh, a 22 square mile area.) combat reaction forces in rear area locations and direct combat support provided to tactical units engaged in operations (POW escorts, convoy security etc...). Directly in war zone the police status needed to be recognize but shiny helmets needed to cover.
I've seen some pictures from 545thMP Co (1st Cav) in 1969 who worn such covers.
I joined a pic from the CSM of the 2nd Company of the 716 MP bn taken from their 1972-73 yearbook. Behind him, he presents a nice example of a cover with the two letters.

Posted Image

Friendly
Valery

Edited by VALERY, 10 February 2007 - 11:46 AM.


#45 SARGE

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Posted 22 April 2007 - 03:44 PM

Gents,

I picked up a camo helmet cover in a "the more you buy - the less you pay" trade today and I have no idea if it is right, wrong, or indifferent. It is smelly and appears to have some age. Opinions are welcome.

Camo_helmet_cover_netting.JPG

The netting below the solid cover is edged in khaki cloth and the tie strings are OD HBT. The netting and cover are very well made with the netting being double stitched. The foliage loops around the cover are the same green HBT material as the tie strings.

Camo_helmet_cover.JPG

Closeup view of the camo pattern and stitching on the foliage loops.

Camo_helmet_cover_loops.JPG

I am not a helmet guy, so what can you tell me about my camo cover?

#46 SteveR

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Posted 22 April 2007 - 04:31 PM

It is a mosquito net cover sir. Not an issue camo cover.

Gents,

I picked up a camo helmet cover in a "the more you buy - the less you pay" trade today and I have no idea if it is right, wrong, or indifferent. It is smelly and appears to have some age. Opinions are welcome.

Camo_helmet_cover_netting.JPG

The netting below the solid cover is edged in khaki cloth and the tie strings are OD HBT. The netting and cover are very well made with the netting being double stitched. The foliage loops around the cover are the same green HBT material as the tie strings.

Camo_helmet_cover.JPG

Closeup view of the camo pattern and stitching on the foliage loops.

Camo_helmet_cover_loops.JPG

I am not a helmet guy, so what can you tell me about my camo cover?



#47 camopara

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Posted 22 April 2007 - 05:34 PM

Well, it's not the 'issue' that everyone thinks of, but it is issue. Steve is correct in that it is primarily a mosquito cover, but it was worn as a camo cover also. There are many pictures of Marines wearing this type of cover usually with the net either tucked up or maybe cut off.

#48 Jeremiah

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Posted 22 April 2007 - 06:40 PM

As stated by my esteemed peer it is a good piece and one of the few very affordable ones left as far as WW2 USMC field gear goes. Nice score!

Jeremiah

#49 SARGE

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Posted 22 April 2007 - 07:28 PM

Well, thank you very much gentlemen.

I am pleased that even a blind pig can find a truffle upon occasion. The HBT tie strings now make perfect sense. Not there to aid the creepy crawly sniper to keep it on his head but instead to keep the wiley mosquito at bay. All part of the QMC dictate to "insect proof" the soldiers' (excuse me, read Marine in this instance) uniform no doubt.

#50 craig_pickrall

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Posted 22 April 2007 - 08:22 PM

http://www.usmilitar...p?showtopic=969

Look at this link and there are a few pics of this style cover used in WW2 combat.


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