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Abandoned US Military Bunkers and Batteries


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#26 willysmb44

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Posted 11 August 2010 - 06:53 PM

I need to dig up the Grand Canyon trip photos we took, I got some photos of what is obviously a MG (or antitank) bunker on the Arizona side of Hoover Dam, at the very top of the heights overlooking it. Beats me if it's abandoned or still being used... :think:

Here's the only shot I could get and that was with a zoom lens, from across the dam. No idea if it's used today or not. I noticed it immediately and it was funny when other tourists were asking what I was taking photos of, they still couldn't tell what it was even when I pointed it out...

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  • ArizonaBunker.jpg


#27 teufelhunde.ret

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Posted 12 August 2010 - 06:54 AM

Fort Fremont, St Helena Island South Carolina. The original site was developed in 1875 and included a wharf extending into Port Royal Sound, as well as a clapboard hospital structure to support the Parris Island Naval Base. At the onset of the Spanish-American war, the wooden hospital was demolished and replaced with a concrete building and the existing fortifications. The first battery (un-named or unknown) was emplaced by 1898. Battery Jessup and Battery Fornance were added in 1899. The hospital section includes a square, two-story colonial revival structure, subsequently incorporated into part of a private residence. Earthen bulwarks protect the harbor side of the masonry buildings that rest on a granite foundation. The roof is designed to collect rainwater for storage in a large cistern. An extensive duct system is used to ventilate the structure.
 

ft_fremont_canopy.jpg

Credit: J. Barry Gooch

 

Facing Port Royal Sound (to the right of this photograph), Battery Fornance was armed with two 4.7-inch cannons. The guns were mounted on an elevating platform which would raise the cannons to fire at enemy ships, then lower them behind the protection of the sand and concrete ramparts


The design, known as "Endicott Batteries" after William C. Endicott, Secretary of War under Grover Cleveland, was constructed as part of a modern coastal defense system and accommodated disappearing guns of 8, 10, 12, and 16 inch diameters, and 10 and 12 inch mortars. Fort Fremont mounted 10" disappearing guns and a rapid-fire battery.

At its peak, the fort covered 70 acres and included a hospital, barracks, stables, guardhouses, commissary, and numerous support buildings. Garrisoned by approximately 110 men and officers of the 116th Coast Artillery, the fort was never involved in military action and the batteries were decommissioned in 1901. Only two batteries and the hospital building remain.
 

fort_fremont_stairs.jpg

Credit: J. Barry Gooch

 

This concrete structure may have been the oil bunker for the old fort. The hospital is located to the left of the photograph and is now part of a private residence.



Named after Savannah native General Charles C. Fremont (one of four major generals appointed by Abraham Lincoln), Fremont was a leading figure in wresting California from Mexico. He became wealthy during the California Gold Rush, later becoming a Senator from that State. In 1856, the Georgian was the first Republican presidential nominee (losing to James Buchanan) and his abolitionist views first raised the specter of Southern secession from the Union if elected. He died in New York City on July 13, 1890, nine years before the fort that bears his name was completed.

In 1910, violence erupted between men of the 116th and local Blacks over the purchase of illegal whiskey. There were several brawls and gunfights, and one fight resulted in the death of Private Frank Quiqley. Quigley, popular in the Beaufort social circle because of his involvement with a local baseball team, is rumored to be the source of the ghostly "Lands End Light," occasionally seen drifting down the deserted road leading to Fort Fremont.
 

ft_fremont2.jpg

Credit: J. Barry Gooch

 

 

Obsolete by the time it was completed, the hardened fortifications of Fort Fremont were proven to be of little protection against modern artillery. Overgrown by the maritime forest, Battery Jesup once mounted two 10-inch cannons. Today, Fort Fremont stands in mute testimony to the bygone era of coastal fortifications.



Fort Fremont was sold at public auction in 1930 and the site passed into private ownership. Now overgrown with vegetation, the impressive structure is partially hidden by a maritime forest. Threatened with vandalism and erosion caused by four-wheelers, fourteen acres of the site were recently purchased by Beaufort County. It is slated to be preserved as a historic site and public park. It was listed in the National Register on May 26, 1989.    Text credit: Sciway website: http://www.sciway.ne...ena-island.html

 

 

 

fortfremont_preview.jpg



#28 fortworthgal

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Posted 12 August 2010 - 09:48 AM

I love urban exploration and all kinds of abandoned stuff! I find the bunkers and missile silos tremendously interesting. I also love abandoned hospitals and creepy vacant cities like Pripyat (Chernobyl) and Centralia, PA. I could stare at photos of this stuff for hours. Very cool pics, guys!

Edited by fortworthgal, 12 August 2010 - 09:50 AM.


#29 Kaneoheboy

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Posted 12 August 2010 - 01:22 PM

The first two photos depict the battery commander's station (BCS) for Battery Brodie, renamed to Battery George W. Ricker in 1946. It was located at a pineapple worker's camp known as "Brodie Camp No. 4" situated a few miles below Schofield Barracks on Oahu, and about five miles above (south) Waialua Bay. The battery was constructed by army engineers in 1942 with two 8-inch Mk. IX Mod. 2 twin-gunned mounts removed from the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Saratoga sometime in February of 1942.

The BCS was centered somewhat between both turret mounts, initially equipped with a naval gun director and computer eventually found unsuitable on guns mounted in fixed positions, standard coast artillery observing instruments, i.e. depression position finder and azimuth instrument were latter supplied.

In February of 1943, a SCR-296A target aquisition radar set was supplied to Battery Brodie, which became the primary target acqisition means supplemented by optical instruments located in assigned base end stations (BES). The antenna was mounted atop the roof of an addition to the BCS that adjoined the west wall, with radar personnel and operating cabinets housed in the room. In addition, SCR-296A radar sets located at Batteries Haleiwa, Opaeula and Kahuku supplemented target acqusition data.

P6280007.jpg

P6280009.jpg

The turret mounts were the major structures located above-ground besides the BCS; each gun was furnished with a projectile, and powder storage magazine that utilized the elevating mechanisms from Saratoga to hoist 260 lb. Mk. XX armor piercing projectiles, and powder bags from below.

8_in_NT_B_Brodie.jpg

One of two 8-inch turret mounts of Battery Brodie/Ricker. Note soldier exiting entryway leading to underground magazine for the gun mount, one of two located on either side of the gun mount. Courtesy US Army Museum of HI.

P6280032.jpg

Escape hatch/ventillation housing for underground battery plotting room, one of two, where range and azimuth data supplied by assigned BES was used to determine a target's position in relation to the battery's guns, which took into consideration many factors, i.e. wind speed, target speed, etc., the resulting information was furnished each gun position where necessary adjustments were made before the order to fire was given by the battery commander, who in turn received orders from a gun group commander.

In case of a miss, observing instruments were used to determine deflection in relation to the target, supplemented by the fire control radar.

The second plotting room was utilized by the "Saratoga Gun Group" commander and staff, which included Batteries Haleiwa and Opaeula. Another underground feature of the battery was a power-generator room equipped with three diesel generators, which routed exhaust gases above ground through vertical pipes, that supplied emergency power to the battery.

Battery HQ, barracks, officers quarters, motor pool, mess hall, and supply room, etc. were located at the rear of the fortification, adjacent to Brodie Camp No. 4. Both turret mounts were covered by a wood and tin roof housing that resembled roofs of the nearby pineapple camp, which were removed prior to firing.

In addition, three similar 8-inch batteries were built on Oahu at Salt Lake-Aliamanu Crater, Opaeula and Wiliwilinui Ridge, the first with the remaining two gun mounts from Saratoga and the others with gun mounts from the USS Lexington removed at the end of March 1942 at PearlHarbor.

Source: John D. Bennett, "Oahu's 8-inch Naval Turret Batteries 1942-1949," Coast Defense Journal, Vol. 22, No. 1 (Feb. 2008), pp. 4-55.

-John

#30 private panda

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 03:26 PM

any one know any good abandoned military sites in central texas? Not just bunkers, but other buildings as well?

#31 gwb123

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Posted 13 August 2010 - 07:03 PM

any one know any good abandoned military sites in central texas? Not just bunkers, but other buildings as well?


Airfields. A lot of pilot and aircrew training took place in Texas during WWII. Some eventually became civil and municiple airports. If you know what to look for, you can spot old towers, water towers, buildings, etc. Check out the following site.

http://members.tripo...irfields_TX.htm

#32 viking73

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 10:41 AM

any one know any good abandoned military sites in central texas? Not just bunkers, but other buildings as well?



How about the old abandoned Nike Missile site just up the road from me in Alvarado, Texas. Has anyone ever gone to this site? How much is still visible and is it accessable?

-Derek

#33 viking73

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 10:49 AM

There are several old bunkers/batteries in and around the Marin Headlands area near San Francisco, CA. I was out there last week visiting family. I don't go to them all, but here's some shots of one of them located on the grounds of the old Fort Barry.

http://i101.photobucket.com/albums/m51/viking73/IMG_1674.jpg

http://i101.photobucket.com/albums/m51/viking73/IMG_1676.jpg

http://i101.photobucket.com/albums/m51/viking73/IMG_1681.jpg

http://i101.photobucket.com/albums/m51/viking73/IMG_1678.jpg

-Derek

#34 Misanthropic_Gods

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Posted 14 August 2010 - 11:39 AM

How about the old abandoned Nike Missile site just up the road from me in Alvarado, Texas. Has anyone ever gone to this site? How much is still visible and is it accessable?

-Derek


The DF-50 (Alvarado) battery seems to have been bought by a private owner for the launch site, and a business owner or somesuch for the IFC. From what it seems, most of the concrete aprons are still there, fairly complete if you know what you are looking at. I think you would be safe poking around the IFC site, but I would ask permission from the landowner (who seems to live on the Launch site in a trailer) to look around the Launch site. If in doubt, ask permission, you DO NOT want to get hit with trespassing.

PM me if you have any questions or want any more data

The Launch Site:
http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z152/Misanthropic_gods/DF-50LaunchSite.jpg
http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z152/Misanthropic_gods/DF-50launchSiteDrive.jpg



The IFC Site:
http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z152/Misanthropic_gods/DF-50IFC.jpg
http://i188.photobucket.com/albums/z152/Misanthropic_gods/DF-50IFCDrive.jpg

Edited by Misanthropic_Gods, 14 August 2010 - 11:43 AM.


#35 flyer333555

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 06:35 PM

The bunkers at Cape May NJ were almost lost to the sea, but a beach replenishment project now have the bunkers well inland.

There are also several bunkers and fortifications at Sandy Hook NJ. I think that was called Fort Mott if I remember correctly.


I am a member of Army Ground Forces Association, a non-profit corporation that does historical interpretation at former Coast Artillery forts as volunteers.

Fort Mott and Sandy Hook are completely different sites. We have worked with/in both.

Sandy Hook is the site of Fort Hancock. It is on the eastern shore of NJ. This is under the National Park Service. In here we have made Battery Gunnison/New Peck look like what it may have looked in 1943. There are two 1903 rifled 6-inch guns, we have restored elevation and azimuth rotation to both cannons, although number 2 is not as smooth as number 1. We have painted, greased, and restored function of ammo hoist for cannon number 2. We have equipped magazine with some 6-inch Navy shells, and gunpowder cans to show what it may have looked like. We also have created a plotting board and restored lighting and fire control switchboards, and have installed working telephones. And assist by showing History House, an officer's house restored by the Park Service, to visitors.

Fort Mott is an NJ State Park in Pennsville, on the other end in the Delaware River. Working directly with the park historian, an NJ Park employee, we have installed telephones, restored a fire control switchboard. Our interpretations here are of 1940-1942. This fort thanks to the efforts of the park historian has a working WW II searchlight and generator, a restored base-end station, a restored Commander's Office. Was part of Officer's Row initially but later used as the Commander's Office. Now it is his office. To be restored are several ambulances and an M1M1A1 90-mm AA gun.

The units we interpret include 7th Coast Artillery (HD); 245th CA (HD) both of the 2nd Coast Artillery District among others. Last year we interpreted Corregidor. I made a display on and wore the DUI of the 60th CA (Anti Aircraft). One member wore the DUI of the 59th CA (Harbor Defense). Another member made a nice display bigger than mine on the Philippine Scouts who had two other units, I believe the 90th and 91st CA (HD).

The members go to other forts and events, I only attend events at these two forts.

Do a google search for Army Ground Forces Association and attend one of our events at Fort Hancock or Fort Mott! On the weekend 28-29 August will be back at Fort Hancock painting, greasing gun #1 and weed-whacking in Battery Gunnison.

In October we will celebrate Fort Hancock Days.

Take care,

Luis Ramos

#36 BEAST

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 07:03 PM

Here is one of the bunkers on the California/Mexico border. It was part of a fire control station built during WWII.

BUNKER_1.JPG



#37 BEAST

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Posted 15 August 2010 - 07:05 PM

View from the interior. That is Tijuana on the viewer's left, the large bowl near the center is a bullfighting ring.

TJ___PACIFIC_OCEAN.JPG



#38 agate hunter

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Posted 20 August 2010 - 12:23 PM

here are some more pics from the west coast. this one is in south central oregon, near cape arago, sunset bay, and shore acres if anyone is from around there. this is another radar/observation bunker.

entrance from the trail
arago_resize_1.jpg

arago_resize_2.jpg

#39 agate hunter

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Posted 20 August 2010 - 12:24 PM

looking down from the hill behind it.
arago_resize_3.jpg

#40 Mr. Standfast

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Posted 20 August 2010 - 04:06 PM

Looks like some great exploration opportunities.

#41 gunbarrel

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 02:03 PM

1948 photo showing the dismantling of one of the 16" guns guarding San Fancisco Bay since 1935. Are the sites still there?

1948___Dismantling_16in_Guns_Guarding_Frisco_Bay_Since_1935___A.jpg

#42 gwb123

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 08:41 PM

Makes you wonder what they used to cut a barrel that large? There looks to be some kind of rig near the front of the bore, but its hard to make out.

This must have been a sad day for the crews who manned and maintained these weapons.

Edited by gwb123, 06 September 2010 - 08:42 PM.


#43 Kaneoheboy

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Posted 06 September 2010 - 10:26 PM

Neat photo, you don't see very many shots of coast artillery guns being cut up for scrap.

M_1890_Mortars__Sand_Is.__1948.jpg

12-inch M1890 Mortars being cut up at the Kapalama M.R., Honolulu in 1948. Courtesy of US Army Museum of Hawaii.

Kaneoheboy :)

#44 gunbarrel

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Posted 07 September 2010 - 02:02 AM

Makes you wonder what they used to cut a barrel that large? There looks to be some kind of rig near the front of the bore, but its hard to make out.


Thanks, Kaneoheboy.

Gil, they used an acetylene torch.

1948___Dismantling_16in_Guns_Guarding_Frisco_Bay_Since_1935___B.jpg

#45 gecko NZ

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Posted 08 September 2010 - 04:55 AM

the big guns used for coastal defense encase the Japanese came to New Zealand were cut up also and sold as scrap to the Japanese after the war, so ive been told, i guess if they wouldn't come to the guns we had to take the guns to them lol

#46 Red Devil

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Posted 08 September 2010 - 06:29 AM

As my fellow Washingtonians mentioned, there are numerous coastal forts to explore in the area. Growing up I enjoyed exploring Fort Casey on Whidbey Island, which still has two guns on display. Fort Worden still has an extensive bunker system, and I ran a cross country race through the grounds and up and down the "artillery hill." The only one I have photos of is from the old Fort Hayden, which is now part of Salt Creek County Park in Clallam County. They routed the road through the large artillery bunkers, and climbing the hills and down to the water you can still find bunkers here and there.

Here is some history of Fort Hayden. The article notes that the guns were scrapped with torches and dynamite. http://www.clallam.n...ks_fthayden.htm

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#47 agate hunter

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Posted 25 June 2012 - 12:38 PM

As my fellow Washingtonians mentioned, there are numerous coastal forts to explore in the area. Growing up I enjoyed exploring Fort Casey on Whidbey Island, which still has two guns on display. Fort Worden still has an extensive bunker system, and I ran a cross country race through the grounds and up and down the "artillery hill." The only one I have photos of is from the old Fort Hayden, which is now part of Salt Creek County Park in Clallam County. They routed the road through the large artillery bunkers, and climbing the hills and down to the water you can still find bunkers here and there.

Here is some history of Fort Hayden. The article notes that the guns were scrapped with torches and dynamite. http://www.clallam.n...ks_fthayden.htm


just looked this place up, i wasn't aware of it. construction on the two 16 inch guns started in 1942 as a means to beef up our coastal defenses, but they were completed a couple months before the war was over. cost a couple million dollars to construct, then they were sold for scrap a couple years later. only fired once in practice. fort hayden had two shielded 6 inch guns as well.

#48 gwb123

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 07:27 PM

For those of you following this thread, here is one I just submitted on the coast artillery batteries of the Artillery District of Honolulu:

http://www.usmilitar...p;#entry1107427

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#49 Bluehawk

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 04:47 AM

1948 photo showing the dismantling of one of the 16" guns guarding San Fancisco Bay since 1935. Are the sites still there?

They absolutely are still there. I have been inside the very one you pictured several times - even played guitar in a performance that was done at the mouth of the installation, in 1972.

This one faces the Pacific at the south end of the Marin headlands, where a number of other war structures were built on those hills and at Fort Cronkhite:

http://www.nps.gov/g...lery-images.htm

You entered this particular one from the east side of the mountain it's built into, through tunnel with a big steel door that has since been completely blocked off. It sits on the pinnacle overlooking Sausalito, facing the Golden Gate bridge.

It can still be accessed by mountaineering types willing to traverse the incline and approach it from the sea side.

One of my favorite places to take out of towners wanting to do unusual tourist visits.

#50 Manchu Warrior

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Posted 28 June 2012 - 10:56 AM

I just saw this thread and I figured I would add to it. My youngest son recently went to a concert at a place called Fort Armistead Park. I had no idea what this place was but I knew that it had to be named after Major George Armistead. He was in command of Fort McHenry when the British attacked the fort during the War of 1812. And after a little research I found out that Fort Armistaed was built back in the 1890's as part of the harbor defense in Baltimore. The Fort was abandoned by the US Army in 1927 and was used by the US Navy as an ammo dump during WWII. It was then turned over to the city of Baltimore in 1947 and turned into a public park. And sadly as you can see from the photos it doesn't look like a family friendly place that you would want to take the kids and wife on a picnic. A little side note Major Armistead is buried in St Paul's Cemetery in Baltimore and his nephew Brigadier General Lewis Armistead CSA who was killed during Pickett's Charge is buried next to him.
800px_Fort_Armistead_Battery_Irons___4.jpg 800px_Fort_Armistead_Battery_McFarland_Emp___2_TL.jpg .jpg]800px_Fort_Armistead_Battery_Irons___3.jpg


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