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WWII NAVAL AVIATOR FLIGHT LOGBOOKS


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#1 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 06:32 PM

One of the collections I have been putting together over the years is devoted to WWII US Naval Aviator Flight Logbooks . They have been getting harder and harder for me to find .

I thought I would share entries from some of my favorite logs. Some of the entries represent triumph and victory. Other entries represent tragedy .

If you have any log entries you want to add to this thread please do so! I would love to see them.

Here is the cover of a standard WWII log .

log.jpg

#2 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 06:39 PM

This log was owned by Ens. Warren F. Wolf of VF(N)-76 - Night Fighting Squadron 76 . During WWII the USN assigned fighter pilots from night fighter squadrons as a part of a detatchments on multiple aircraft carriers. They did not stay together .

During the Marianas Turkey Shoot , Wolf was assigned to VF-1 on the USS Yorktown. On June 19, 1944 he shot down 1 Zero and was himself shot down by friendly anti-aircraft fire from a ship. He was picked up in the water by the USS Gridley . Tragically while assigned to VF-13 on the USS Franklin , Wolf was killed taking off from the carrier in an accident on Oct 30, 1944 .




wolf.jpg

#3 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 06:48 PM

Page from the log of ARM1c Scott McCartney . He server as a Radioman-Gunner on an Avenger with VT-15 (Torpedo Squadron 15) on the USS Essex .

During October 24 and 25 he participated in the Battle of Leyte Gulf. On October 24, he assisted in the sinking of a Japanese battleship, and on the 25th an aircraft carrier . His pilot earned the Navy Cross for their actions those 2 days . Mcartney earned a DFC .


VT_15.jpg

#4 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 06:55 PM

Page from the log of Lt Jack Dowler. He served as the fighter pilot of a Hellcat with VF-31 ( Fighting Squadron 31 ) on the USS Sangamom.

I chose this page because he was flying support missions during the battle of Okinawa which was very dangerous. The number of combat flights he made in April must have been mind numbing for him. He made a total of 28 carrier landings in April , which was a lot especially in combat conditions . ( CAP stands for Combat Air Patrol - CL Carrier Landing - CAT Catapult shot )


VF_31.jpg

#5 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 06:59 PM

Page from the log of Lt Jack Littlefield . He served as the pilot of an avenger with VT-87 ( Torpedo Squadron 87 ) on the USS Ticonderoga .

On July 24, 1945 Air Group 87 was attacking Japanese shipping in Kure Harbor and spotted the last remnants of her mighty fleet . Lt Littlefield was awarded the Navy Cross for his part in sinking the Japanese battleship Hyuga . He earned the DFC 2 days later for his part in sinking the cruiser Tone .

The President of the United States of America takes pleasure in presenting the Navy Cross to Lieutenant Jack Littlefield, United States Naval Reserve, for extraordinary heroism in operations against the enemy while serving as Pilot of a carrier-based Navy Torpedo Plane in Torpedo Squadron EIGHTY-SEVEN (VT-87), attached to the U.S.S. TICONDEROGA (CV-14), during action against enemy Japanese forces in the Kure Area of the Inland Sea of Japan, on 24 July 1945. Encountering intense anti-aircraft fire from hostile shore batteries as he approached the target, Lieutenant Littlefield courageously led his four-plane division in a coordinated strike against the Japanese battleship HYUGA and, in the face of a heavy barrage of fire from the formidable enemy warship, pressed home a vigorous attack to score two direct hits on the hostile vessel. By his expert airmanship, fighting spirit and devotion to duty, Lieutenant Littlefield contributed materially to the success of his squadron in sinking the enemy ship and upheld the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service.
General Orders: Commander 2d Carrier Task Force Pacific: Serial 01896 (September 22, 1945)


littlefield.jpg

Edited by KASTAUFFER, 19 January 2015 - 11:21 AM.


#6 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 07:06 PM

Page from the log of Ens Robert E. Jansen . He served as the navigator of both PBY Catalinas and PV-1 Harpoon bombers with VP-43 ( Patrol Squadron 43 ) and VB-139 ( Bombing Squadron 139 ) in Alaska .

He flew a number of missions over ther Japanese held Parmushiro Islands with no major issues. Flying conditions in Alaska could be quite dangerous and on March 25, 1944 the bomber he was in had problems taking off and the plance crashed into a frozen lake at the end of the runway . Jansen did not survive , however 3 of the crew did .

Jansen.jpg

#7 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 07:14 PM

Page from the log of ARM3c Fred A Meyer . He served as a radioman-gunner on an avenger with VC-87 ( Composite Squadron 87 ) on the USS Salamaua .

On January 13, 1945 a kamikaze carrying two 250 kg. bombs crashed SALAMAUA's flight deck. Over eighty men were injured. Fifteen were killed. Damage was extensive. Fred was thrown from the deck and suffered extensive burns. He never flew again.

The last entry in his log is Dated January 12, 1945 for a mission in the Philippines .


VC_87.jpg

#8 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 07:17 PM

My last entry for today ! I will probably add more later.

This is a page from the log of AMM3c Henry C. Lange . He flew as part of a crew on a PBM Mariner with VP-208 ( Patrol Squadron 208 ) .

I chose this page to illustrate the long missions these men had to fly . Most range from 12-15 hours .

Many of us complain when we have to fly 5 hours on a cross country commercial flight!

VPB_208.jpg

Edited by KASTAUFFER, 25 July 2007 - 07:18 PM.


#9 Bob Hudson

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 11:28 AM

Does anyone have any they would like to add to the thread ?

Kurt


Just keep posting them... a most concise but interesting historical record.

#10 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 05:38 PM

In addition to interesting entries, some men put artwork in their logs too. Here are some examples I have:

This first one in in the inside back cover of ARM3c Donald Forgey's log. He was a radioman-gunner with VT-23 on the USS Princeton. After each strike against a Japanese island, he added a slash below the artwork

forgey.jpg


THe next examples are renditions of a different naval aircraft. The owner of the log LT John Stinson flew the PBY that he drew . He served with VP-92 and 92-P-8 was his plane.


stinson1.jpg
stinson2.jpg

#11 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 05:47 PM

This next page is from the log of AMM1c Charles Bell. He was a machinist on a PB4Y-1 bomber with VPB-111 ( Patrol Bombing Squadron 111 ).

He kept a sloppy log, but made some interesting entries . On July 22, the crew shot down a Japanese Dinah bomber . His descripton of the events almost make you feel like you were there.



bell.jpg

Edited by KASTAUFFER, 26 July 2007 - 05:49 PM.


#12 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 08:13 PM

Here are a few more posts devoted to PRE-WWII Logbooks

I have not found one from WWI yet http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/crying.gif

This is the earliest logbook I own . It is part of a group of 8 logs to the same person. He flew from 1923 all the way through WWII.

This is an example of a log made in WWI . The distinguishing differences are the OP. AIR 100 notation on the front cover, the snap used to keep the book closed, and the mustard color of the cover . WWII books did not have this feature.

log_1.jpg
log_3.jpg

Edited by KASTAUFFER, 31 July 2007 - 08:35 PM.


#13 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 08:17 PM

This next log is a variety seen in the 1920's and sometimes in the 1930's . It does not have the OP. AIR 100 notation on the cover , is still mustard in color , and has a flap on the cover to keep it closed. The snap was not used .

This one was owned by a radioman on an O2U-1 scouting plane from the USS Richmond.


log_a1.jpg
log_a3.jpg

#14 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 08:20 PM

This last example was used from the late 1920's up until early WWII .

The color on the cover has changed to burnt orange . The designation N. AER 4111 was added which was also used on WWII logs .

This example was owned by a AMM2c that flew on the ZMC-2 which was a rigid airship ( blimp ) .

log_b1.jpg
log_b3.jpg

#15 Bob Hudson

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Posted 31 July 2007 - 09:07 PM

I happened to run into a a Navy pilot's log at the swap meet last Saturday. It is actually two log books since he had filled up the first one. They were taped together and start with his first familiarization flight in a T28B at Pensacola in 1982. It goes on through the T2C Buckeye, TA-4J Skyhawk and S-3A Viking. I have not been able to find anything notable in the REMARKS column, which is probably good, since anything notable while flying on and off carriers in peacetime would likely not be pleasant experiences.

It is interesting the see the section in the back of the log where they record the issued of "BOOTS, flying", "GLASSES, sun" and other gear. This FLIGHT CLOTHING RECORD takes up five pages.

This guy did his last flight in Sept. 1988, ending up with 1703.4 hours of pilot time.

#16 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 10:06 AM

I happened to run into a a Navy pilot's log at the swap meet last Saturday. It is actually two log books since he had filled up the first one. They were taped together and start with his first familiarization flight in a T28B at Pensacola in 1982. It goes on through the T2C Buckeye, TA-4J Skyhawk and S-3A Viking. I have not been able to find anything notable in the REMARKS column, which is probably good, since anything notable while flying on and off carriers in peacetime would likely not be pleasant experiences.

It is interesting the see the section in the back of the log where they record the issued of "BOOTS, flying", "GLASSES, sun" and other gear. This FLIGHT CLOTHING RECORD takes up five pages.

This guy did his last flight in Sept. 1988, ending up with 1703.4 hours of pilot time.



During WWII most USN logs have the equipment issue records too. It is interesting to see what they received.

I dont think I have seen one of the newer logs. If you have time post a page!

Kurt

#17 teufelhunde.ret

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 10:34 AM

These are great and thank you for sharing, hope to see more USMC. s/f Darrell

#18 dustin

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 02:51 PM

very awesome and interesting! I have never come across one logged in yet all have been empty or even filled in by civilians.

#19 TBMflyer

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 05:55 PM

Kurt, here are a couple of pages from some logs. First is from a VT-6 gunner off the Hancock. He flew Air support for Okinawa. After the ship was hit by a Kamikaze, they went back out in June and hit Japan. Here is a close-up of a page from March/April of 1945. Mark.
MVC_018F.JPG

#20 TBMflyer

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 05:58 PM

Next is from a USMC gunner who flew SBD's with VMSB-235/341. He flew from Green Island then from the Philippines. This page is from his time on Green with '235. He flew 67 missions in WWII and didn't receive an Air Medal !! Mark.
MVC_019F.JPG

#21 TBMflyer

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 06:02 PM

Last one tonight. This is from Lt. Welsh of VB-105 who flew PB4Y's out of England on anti-sub patrols. They ran into some Ju-88's over Biscay in Dec. of 1943. He flew a total of 50 missions in '43-'44. I found this at a show along with his ribbons, DFC, wings etc.. Mark.
MVC_020F.JPG

#22 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 07:36 PM

Mark , those are some nice logs!

Dustin , here are some scans of the equipment issue pages from a few logs .


a1.jpg
a2.jpg

Edited by KASTAUFFER, 01 August 2007 - 07:37 PM.


#23 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 07:37 PM

a4.jpg
a6.jpg

#24 dustin

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Posted 02 August 2007 - 08:51 AM

Kurt thanks for posting those equipment listings,some interesting things I see
The log book for Hall is of particular interest it looks as if most items issued were from Naval Air Station Klamath Falls OR. ( OR.is that the abbreviation as it is a bit blurry?) I did not know there was a NAS there in Oregon.Klamath falls is way in inland and in lower central oregon unlike most all other NAS's which are on the coasts.
the listing for Cap,Baseball is interesting I wonder which cap they are refering to the HBT type or the Blue cap?! I have always wanted a blue cap but am not sure what would be authentic, were they made from one company or were they a standard civilian type.I was once told that the NY Yankees donated an amount of caps to the USN,I am not sure on the truth of this!I do have a naval letter talking about the issue of blue baseball caps to aviators,I will dig it up! Also I have incountered other literature stating that aviators wore blue caps and ground crew wore red baseball caps to help distinguish between them in the field.does anyone have a I'ded blue avaitor cap for reference?
The other thing that caught my eye in Hall's log book was the listing for wrist compass.It is interesting to see it listed here as it was part of the optional aviators equipment as of october 1944 this list is a bit long but no other items of personnal either standard or optional equipment is listed such as revolver,life vest etc..

the listing of jerseys,kahki summer is another good one,I have never seen one in real life,they were commonly issued to carrier deck crews and also to aviators as an optional summer wear when I get a chance i will post a vintage picture of the jersey.

Edited by dustin, 02 August 2007 - 08:54 AM.


#25 dustin

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Posted 02 August 2007 - 02:13 PM

here is that article on baseball caps.I have not read it for sometime and answered my own question on the type procured for aviators they are the tan type as desrcibed in article.
cap_article_1.jpg
cap_article_2.jpg
last line reads "tan,with beaks that are long and wide"

Edited by dustin, 02 August 2007 - 02:14 PM.



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