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Dog Tags Styles and examples Part 1


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#51 Bob Hudson

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 08:58 PM

That does look like a WWI dog tag. I don't think they had serial numbers on WWI tags.

Ancestry.com shows WWI draft registration records for Eugene Cummins Ewing. A
Eugene C. Ewing died in 1999 in Lackawanna, Pennsylvania. Another Eugene C Ewing died 1921 in Wyandot County, Ohio.

#52 nkomo

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Posted 24 July 2007 - 09:04 PM

Since I live across the river from southern Ohio, I'd put money on the Ohio connection.
Do you think this was a sweet heart piece or was it actually worn by Lt. Ewing?

Edited by nkomo, 24 July 2007 - 09:05 PM.


#53 Guest_hjalmars2000_*

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 04:50 PM

hello all,
my son found a dog tag on the icelandic coast in Reykjavik. it is wwii style and it is the only military artefact in my posession of which im sure about the authenticity. it is quite worn but the inscription can still be seen:

Howard Isreal
373032
B
USMCR

holding a piece of history in one“s hand is quite fascinating and i can“t help wondering if there is any chance in hell i can locate this guy“s family and send them the dogtag. he might have died here, who knows? help, anyone?
kind regards,
Walter

#54 Bob Hudson

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 09:24 PM

hello all,
my son found a dog tag on the icelandic coast in Reykjavik. it is wwii style and it is the only military artefact in my posession of which im sure about the authenticity. it is quite worn but the inscription can still be seen:

Howard Isreal
373032
B
USMCR

holding a piece of history in one“s hand is quite fascinating and i can“t help wondering if there is any chance in hell i can locate this guy“s family and send them the dogtag. he might have died here, who knows? help, anyone?
kind regards,
Walter


Have you seen the artilce about the Marines in Iceland: http://www.ibiblio.o...-C-Iceland.html

#55 BEAST

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 02:35 AM

hello all,
my son found a dog tag on the icelandic coast in Reykjavik. it is wwii style and it is the only military artefact in my posession of which im sure about the authenticity. it is quite worn but the inscription can still be seen:

Howard Isreal
373032
B
USMCR

holding a piece of history in one“s hand is quite fascinating and i can“t help wondering if there is any chance in hell i can locate this guy“s family and send them the dogtag. he might have died here, who knows? help, anyone?
kind regards,
Walter

Hi Walter,
Contact your local US Department of Veteran Affairs Regional Office. They are located in every state. They should be able to provide some information and may even help coordinate returning the tag. However I don't believe that they will give you the veteran's or their families address. However they may contact the family for you.

You can find the locations at: http://www1.va.gov/d.../guide/home.asp

Good luck! Let us know the outcome!

#56 Guest_SJKent_*

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 11:37 AM

Hi,

Nice unit. More than likely a white officer. This piece is a private purchase item available during the WWI era to accomodate the standard issue aluminium identity disks. When purchased new, a cardboard tag, the same size and holed like an ID disk, was found inside with instructions printed on it for the item's use. It is a locket of sorts meant to protect the tags themselves or make them a little more faishonable or comfortable to wear. Classic Art Nouveau excess. When closed you will notice a slot at the top. The khaki herringbone tape typically found on WWI tags (age/wear has made most extant ones appear to be "rolled" into a cord-like form) would pass through a single tag and then exit through the top. The wearer then would have a faishonable locket of sorts to hold the ID disk and small photos inside either panel and it would certainly be more comfortable to wear against the skin. They were often engraved with the owner's name and hometown. They were often, if not always, made of sterling silver. A couple of mine have celluloid inserts where photographs can be placed under them. I have several named ones in groups, one of which is to a 332nd ambulance driver. Your "tag" appears to be a theater made, ersatz version made from an old silver coin, which was not uncommon. Typically, French silver coins would be "shaved" and engraved with the requisite personal information on them. These ersatz ID tags found there way onto bracelets, neck cords, etc. Regarding this genre of items, I have an engraved set of commercially produced sterling silver ID tags from an AEF officer.

#57 relichelmet

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 04:01 PM

Sęll vertu. Žorsteinn heiti ég og er safnari. Ég safna munum tengdum hernįminu į Ķslandi. Endilega lįttu mig vita ef aš žś eša sonur žinn viljiš selja "hundsmerkiš"?

Kvešja Žorsteinn

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#58 Jeremiah

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 04:22 PM

Hi Walter,
That is a very, very special find. The marine brigade in Iceland is an area of particular interest of mine as my old regiment was part of it. PM me if you would like me to try and track this fellow or his family down. Might not be able to but I can certainly try for you. Any chance of seeing a picture?

Cheers,
Jeremiah

#59 Brig

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Posted 26 July 2007 - 04:26 PM

Marines in the past, and currently, have run plenty of troops through Iceland. this is a very interesting find and should be researched!

#60 nkomo

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 07:15 AM

Thanks for the reply! I am not a WW1 collector nor am I a dog tag collector , but this piece caught my eye immediately. I figured for $15 it was a good deal. I thought it might be an unusual piece when I saw the R.I.U.S. on the dog tag. I didn't realize who the 369th were until I got home and did some research. I was surprised to find out that the 369th were an African-American unit that was sent to France and attached to a French division. What was unusual about this unit was that they wore US uniforms, but used Frnch webgear and weapons.

Edited by nkomo, 27 July 2007 - 07:21 AM.


#61 Guest_hjalmars2000_*

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 03:20 PM

hi again,
thanks for the help and article, very interesting read. well, there“s a little problem with local. i happen to live in Iceland. i did start a discussion on wings, qual badges, duis“ & awards and will continue there.
cheers,
Walter

#62 Guest_hjalmars2000_*

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 03:53 PM

hi,
couldn“t agree more. finding a military artefact is one thing but finding somebody“s personal id is quite different. one can“t help to wonder abt the fate of the soldier in question. yes, Jeremiah i would very much appreciate your help and i will PM you when I track your e-mail down. i snapped a decent picture and will do my best to post the thing on here.
cheers,
Walter

#63 Guest_hjalmars2000_*

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Posted 27 July 2007 - 05:08 PM

here“s first attempt to attach the pic.
W.

#64 GICOP

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 12:16 AM

PLASTIC/BAKELITE USMC DOG TAGS

Can anyone give me some info on this style of tag i.e.

Dates of manufacture

Any special markings to look for

Many thanks

Martyn

#65 GICOP

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Posted 28 July 2007 - 02:29 AM

:rolleyes:

PLASTIC/BAKELITE USMC DOG TAGS

Can anyone give me some info on this style of tag i.e.

Dates of manufacture

Any special markings to look for

Many thanks

Martyn

Sorry wrong section, should read EGA not DogTag :rolleyes:

#66 relichelmet

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Posted 29 July 2007 - 03:02 PM

Walter I have been trying to send you respond to your email but there is something wrong with your mailserver. I have sent you private message here on the forum

Best Regards Thorsteinn.

#67 Andre

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Posted 01 August 2007 - 11:24 PM

Hi ,

I bought this dog tag last week it was bought on a flea market in Belgium(Arlon)
maybe someone can help me find some information about the soldier,i tried already but haven,t been really succesful.I did find out that he was a draftee looking at the first numbers but that was about all.


GREEN,EARL.E
31078671 T42-T43 O


P

-----------------------------------------------------


THANKS VERY MUCH!!!!!!
ANDRE

Attached Images

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Edited by Andre, 01 August 2007 - 11:25 PM.


#68 kfields

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 05:12 AM

That is interesting because it was obviously made after his death so it was not something issued to him. A couple of online sources say the oval, single hole Navy tags were issued beginning in 1921. Someone must have obtained one of those and hand etched the info on it.



Actually these type Navy tags were first created in 1917. Definitely not post-WWI. Paul Braddock who wrote the book "Dogtags" has done a great deal of research on the matter. Kim

#69 kfields

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 05:45 AM

I picked these up with the chain this morning for $2 at the Sunday morning flea market. Social Security numbers. I've blocked out part of the number for obvious reasons. My understanding is that the SSN came into use beginning in 1969. Not sure about the use of the term "Native American" on tags. The chain is well worn such that the chrome is worn off and the brass is exposed.
Anything here that could help date these tags more precisely?
Tags are marked:

Joiner, Michael A.
307-94-xxxx
Native American
AB-

Kim
MVC_451S.JPG

Edited by kfields, 05 August 2007 - 05:47 AM.


#70 Bob Hudson

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 09:23 AM

One source says the SSN was used starting in 1965, but I went into the Air Force in 1968 and some part of my brain recalls having to learn a serial number, but soon after changing over to use of the SSN. Maybe there was a transistion period?

That "Native American" would have been the religious preference. The only other time I have seen that was in a newspaper article years about the the California prison system. A judge ordered one prison to allow inmates with a "Native American" religious preference to construct a "sweat lodge." Those now exist in many prisons according to an online article i just found ( see http://www.pluralism...p?profile=74092 ) but I don't know that I have heard of the military being asked to do anything similar.

#71 Brig

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 10:17 AM

I'd block out the rest of the SSN, the last 4 are not important, as the military uses them for EVERYTHING and thus are not a secret. The rest of the numbers, however, are what identifies the last 4 to belong to that individual vs. the other 30 guys in the service with the same last 4 (there's 8 people in the service currently with the same last 4 as me)

as for dating, running his information through NARA or a geneology site such as Ancestry.com and look at military records. He might have been in the service for only 1-4 years for Vietnam, and that would help establish a window of the tags age

Edited by Brig, 05 August 2007 - 10:20 AM.


#72 Bank Vault

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 10:37 AM

Hi ,

I bought this dog tag last week it was bought on a flea market in Belgium(Arlon)
maybe someone can help me find some information about the soldier,i tried already but haven,t been really succesful.I did find out that he was a draftee looking at the first numbers but that was about all.
GREEN,EARL.E
31078671 T42-T43 O
P

-----------------------------------------------------
THANKS VERY MUCH!!!!!!
ANDRE

The T42-T43 means that's when he had his vaccinations so this is a WW2 tag, the O means he aws type O, not a pro on tags so I am not sure whether he was pos or neg, and the P is Protestant (sorry if it its spelled wrong, I am a terrible speller) if I am correct, hope I helped some.

#73 Jeeper704

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Posted 05 August 2007 - 01:03 PM

Tried NARA?

Erwin

#74 Andre

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 12:11 PM

Tried NARA?

Erwin



Yes i tried but it doesn,t find anything,maybe because they had a fire in the 70ies.
Maybe i should just write to them or send them this special form.

regards
Andre

#75 Greg Sebring

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Posted 07 August 2007 - 02:19 PM

Andre,

You might have already checked this site but here is a dogtag site that helps decipher them a bit.

http://home.att.net/...w2_dog_tags.htm

Greg


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