Jump to content


Photo

AIRBORNE CRICKETS


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 Sparky

Sparky

    BANNED

  • Banned
    • Member ID: 145
  • 132 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 June 2007 - 04:38 PM

Hi all,

I just received the final group of crickets that were ground dug in normandy.

Some interesting things to note.

The top left one has 2 holes in it. One smaller one probably made by mistake and one larger one that would fit a string.

The other one has an elongated hole in it. Probably made by the tip of a knife.

These were all cleaned by the finder except the two that are damaged with the missing side walls.

Attached Images

  • MVC_023S.JPG
  • MVC_024S.JPG
  • MVC_025S.JPG


#2 Peace

Peace
  • Members
    • Member ID: 132
  • 769 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Belgium

Posted 27 June 2007 - 12:48 PM

Very very nice Spark!!

#3 Michiel M.

Michiel M.
  • Members
    • Member ID: 178
  • 155 posts

Posted 28 June 2007 - 02:23 AM

Indeed..

How many of them do you got now?

#4 Adam Townsend

Adam Townsend
  • Members
    • Member ID: 101
  • 719 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pulaski NY

Posted 28 June 2007 - 06:32 AM

I've just got a few questions, and I really don't mean to come down on anyone.

If these are so rare, how are so many coming straight to you? Do you have a source in Normandy?

Is there a difference between these crickets, for military use, and the crickets that were toys before the war? It seems like if I found a box of mint crickets at a toy warehouse I would have the same thing.

Great pieces of history though! Thanks for sharing!

Adam

#5 Sparky

Sparky

    BANNED

  • Banned
    • Member ID: 145
  • 132 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 28 June 2007 - 07:06 PM

Hi Adam,

I totally understand people's septicism.

These crickets were dug up over a number of years in Normandy by the son of the caretaker of the U.S. Cemetery in Colville sur Mer (Omaha Beach). In fact, when he first started digging and finding artifacts, he would find the occasional cricket and throw it back in the hole as he didn't know what they were!

He now lives in the U.S. and contacted me via my website. This cache has really excited the Airborne collecting community because they are so rare.

You could find a box of brand new crickets and you would have the same thing except for a couple major factors. The new found crickets did not make the jump in Normandy and they were never carried by a Paratrooper in combat.

Some years ago a box WAS found in England that contained a number of the chrome type crickets marked "ACME" "Made in England". When the supply of brass crickets was exhausted, they sent some troopers out to look for more. They found the chrome ACME crickets and handed those out. It seems that many of those ended up in the hands of officers. This type of cricket, if attributed to a paratrooper is far more rare than the brass type. One such cricket turned up in the effects of 101st/502, Abn. Doctor Capt. "Doc" Lage and resides in Mark Bando's collection.

I have created a COA for the crickets and it is stated that I offer a 100% unconditional money back guarantee on their originality for my lifetime.

Those who know that these are originals have snapped them up and they have gone into some of the top Airborne collections in the world. Those people that know me, know that I have never knowingly sold a reproduction and vigorously go after those that do! I am not a dealer, just a collector who occasionally sells an item or two once in a while due to it being a duplicate or something that I don't collect anymore.

With the latest delivery, I have three that I have kept for my collection and ten that are available.












I've just got a few questions, and I really don't mean to come down on anyone.

If these are so rare, how are so many coming straight to you? Do you have a source in Normandy?

Is there a difference between these crickets, for military use, and the crickets that were toys before the war? It seems like if I found a box of mint crickets at a toy warehouse I would have the same thing.

Great pieces of history though! Thanks for sharing!

Adam


Edited by Sparky, 28 June 2007 - 07:10 PM.


#6 88thcollector

88thcollector
  • Members
    • Member ID: 827
  • 1,414 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 30 June 2007 - 09:20 PM

Hi,

I have heard that the 82nd were issued a different type of cricket, primarily toy store crickets that were quickly spry painted green or yellow.

Is this true?

We have one I believe in pretty much. Ic came with an invasion flag still sewn to sleeve material and some other misc WW2 items. It was on eBay but misdescribed and went real low. The cticket is painted yellow.

Thanks for any info.

Steve

PS: we have been on a 3 week vacation and found a few neat things I will try to post tomorrow.

#7 Brig

Brig

    SENIOR MODERATOR

  • Senior Moderators
    • Member ID: 22
  • 22,020 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Crossroads of the Corps

Posted 30 June 2007 - 09:22 PM

I've heard the toy story, as well

#8 Adam Townsend

Adam Townsend
  • Members
    • Member ID: 101
  • 719 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Pulaski NY

Posted 01 July 2007 - 08:55 AM

I've heard the toy story, as well


Off topic, but it seemed appropriate.

Posted Image

Edited by Adam Townsend, 01 July 2007 - 08:55 AM.


#9 Sparky

Sparky

    BANNED

  • Banned
    • Member ID: 145
  • 132 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 01 July 2007 - 08:58 AM

I've heard the toy story, as well



Although Gen. Gavin did not like the cricket. There should be no doubt that some 82nd troopers were issued crickets. It has been mentioned in assorted books written by 82nd troopers who jumped in Normandy.

I have seen dirty. blackened toy crickets in a few 82nd troopers groupings. My step fathers father jumped with the 82nd in the Ste.Mere Eglise area and he had a cricket. His group was ordered to throw them away later during the next 36 hours, when it became appearent that the Germans were using them against them.

#10 Russell 1910

Russell 1910
  • Members
    • Member ID: 141
  • 224 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 08 July 2007 - 07:35 AM

Here is one I located at an antique store a few years ago here in the U.S. for a dollar. Was it used in France in 1944? Maybe, maybe not. I tend to think it was used by an Easy Co. 506th guy though http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/twothumbup.gif. Although having one with documented provenance and/or directly from the vet, (or in the pocket of a uniform/grouping) would be nice.



click1.jpg



click2.jpg

#11 Sparky

Sparky

    BANNED

  • Banned
    • Member ID: 145
  • 132 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 08 July 2007 - 07:47 AM

Here is one I located at an antique store a few years ago here in the U.S. for a dollar. Was it used in France in 1944? Maybe, maybe not. I tend to think it was used by an Easy Co. 506th guy though http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/twothumbup.gif. Although having one with documented provenance and/or directly from the vet, (or in the pocket of a uniform/grouping) would be nice.
click1.jpg
click2.jpg




That's a great find for a buck!

It's a good one as well. It has the tell tale flaws and manufacturing techniques that you look for in a real cricket

#12 Brig

Brig

    SENIOR MODERATOR

  • Senior Moderators
    • Member ID: 22
  • 22,020 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Crossroads of the Corps

Posted 08 July 2007 - 07:49 AM

can't go wrong for a buck. does it still chirp?

#13 Russell 1910

Russell 1910
  • Members
    • Member ID: 141
  • 224 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 11 July 2007 - 05:00 PM

can't go wrong for a buck. does it still chirp?



Yes it does still work, quite well.

I had the chance to attend the 101st reunion at Camp Toccoa in North Georgia a few years ago. There were a number of airborne reenactors with an equipment display. At one point when I walked by several of them were standing in a group, all clicking their repro crickets, comparing the sounds, trying to decide who's was the most authentic. Very amusing.

#14 APO472

APO472

    INACTIVE

  • Inactive
    • Member ID: 261
  • 2,027 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 11 July 2007 - 07:27 PM

Yes it does still work, quite well.

I had the chance to attend the 101st reunion at Camp Toccoa in North Georgia a few years ago. There were a number of airborne reenactors with an equipment display. At one point when I walked by several of them were standing in a group, all clicking their repro crickets, comparing the sounds, trying to decide who's was the most authentic. Very amusing.

Real ones sound distictly different than the best repro.

Edited by APO472, 11 July 2007 - 07:28 PM.


#15 RustyCanteen

RustyCanteen

    ADMINISTRATOR

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 24,355
  • 15,572 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Earth

Posted 12 March 2013 - 03:32 PM

Since these are notoriously difficult to authenticate, and because of the high dollar value of them; anyone interested in these is strongly urged to use caution and do further research before buying.


1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users