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Dent Steaming???


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#1 pmanton

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 09:45 AM

I'd be very interested in hearing how you guys steam dents out of stocks. I've been using a wet cloth over the dent and a hot iron.

I do a lot of steaming without much results.

Does anyone have a better method?

Thanks

Paul
Salome, AZ

#2 gpw_42

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 11:13 AM

I've had pretty good results by using a tea kettle with a 8" radiator hose attached to the spout. You just have to be careful with how you hold the stock to avoid a steam burn. Part of the results will depend on how bad a gouge you're trying to fix.

I think the hot iron/rag method is good for small dings.

Whatever technique you use, the key is to let it dry thoroughly (AT LEAST 24 hours, 48-72 would be better) before a light sanding.

Good luck!
Steve

#3 Devious6

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Posted 02 December 2009 - 03:25 PM

I use the wet towel and hot iron approach and have had very good results. The iron has to be hot enought to create steam - that what lifts the dent.

#4 Chris_B

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 02:45 PM

Depends on the dent. A smashed area actually seems to lift fairly well, while in my experience a true 'dent' that is just compressed wood is a tough nut to crack. I got fairly good results with a steam iron and a cloth:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v441/Chuck_Older/dent1.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v441/Chuck_Older/dent2.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v441/Chuck_Older/dent3.jpg

#5 Devious6

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 07:32 PM

I don't want to state the obvious, but the wood should be stripped of any laquer or varnish finish before trying to lift a dent with steam - the moisture has to be able to penetrate the wood. No intent to offend anyone but just want to make sure that we don't overlook a key step.

#6 AustinO

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Posted 03 December 2009 - 10:33 PM

Another option, if its a rough stock, is a soak (or two) in the tub. About a year ago I had a Inland carbine stock that was beat up and varnished! After I stripped it down, a couple soaks in the tub took out most everything (short of the actual breaks in wood fiber, which included the IO and P marks). Just make sure you clean the tub after, lest the missus be all :evilgrin:
I suppose this could be considered the extreme of dent steaming, but it worked very well on my rough stock...

#7 Milsurp Collector

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 01:45 PM

I use a scunci steamer

Posted Image

It allows much more precise application of steam and for a much longer time than the iron and wet cloth method. It also works better on curved surfaces than an iron.

Before

Posted Image

During

Posted Image

After

Posted Image

#8 gunbunny

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 12:18 AM

This is what I use. It's a Norelco steamer meant to take the wrinkles out of clothing. It's intended to be a traveling device and is compact with a folding handle. I've found it to be quite effective.

http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j27/Cavgunbunny/DSCN5652-1.jpg

#9 tsellati

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 12:27 AM

I don't want to state the obvious, but the wood should be stripped of any laquer or varnish finish before trying to lift a dent with steam - the moisture has to be able to penetrate the wood. No intent to offend anyone but just want to make sure that we don't overlook a key step.


Give that man a "ceegar" :thumbsup: . Actually, many don't realize the very important point you make and it's precisely because you have to remove an original finish to achieve the most effective dent/ding removal that I would never suggest doing it. IMHO you should leave the stock as it is, dents, dings, initials - if they are period they are all part of the rifle's provenance.

Then again, I'm a bit of a purist collector so consider the source.

Tim

Edited by tsellati, 05 December 2009 - 12:29 AM.


#10 Chris_B

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 06:13 AM

If it needs a re-finish, then the steaming isn't an issue. The key here is "needs", and that's not black and white. The stock in my photos for instance would not respond to cleaning- mild, moderate, or aggressive, and the color was 'arsenal red'...on the inside. It was black and dark chocolate on the outside, with that stuff not coming off until I was removing whatever original red finish there was

if the stock was USGI and had original cartouches, I would have went a different route. As it was USGI, ugly, ouchy, and only had scant rebuild cartouches. I rolled up my sleeves, protected the cartouches and went to town. And I left a lot of gouges and dings, and the dent removal was still 4 or 5 hours

The steam also can lighten the wood considerably. I had great results, YMMV

Here's my Dad's M1 carbine stock. I wiped it with denatured alcohol and odorless mineral spirits, let it dry in the sun for a few hours, and applied a single coat of BLO, bam, done. Total time 3 hours, so this is a good example of how acceptable results can be attained with little time invested- it's the same color as my M1 rifle stock that I spent oh...80 or so hours on :lol:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v441/Chuck_Older/m1carbinestock.jpg

Edited by Chris_B, 05 December 2009 - 06:22 AM.



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