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Hi-Standard Model HD Military w/ shoulder holster

Started by nkomo , Sep 24 2009 07:53 PM

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#1 nkomo

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 07:53 PM

This is one of my dad's new finds. He just bought this last weekend. When he called me to tell me about his find, he was so excited. I think this is the first military Hi-Standard he has ever owned. I think he did pretty well.

The pistol is a Hi-Standard Model HD Military with US military markings. It is stamped "Property of USA" on the top of the barrel and has the US and the Ordinance symbol on the side. It has a 4" barrel and the serial number is in the 131,000 range. My dad said he thought it was made in 1943 or so.

What is so neat about this gun is that it came with a very used .45 Automatic holster. The gun has been in the holster for quite sometime, as the holster has taken the shape of the gun. The holster is made by Enger-Kress.

The seller told my dad that it was carried by some guy during WW2. Maybe OSS? Wish I had a name or something else. Hope you guys like it!!!!
Arch

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#2 nkomo

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 07:55 PM

Close-ups of the pistol.

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#3 nkomo

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 07:56 PM

Some more close-ups.

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#4 nkomo

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 07:57 PM

More.

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#5 nkomo

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Posted 24 September 2009 - 07:57 PM

Holster markings.

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#6 DM1975

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 01:54 PM

Very nice. I love my HD military (mine is the longer barrel version). It is true that the OSS used these, but they were ones with built in silencers. SOG used them in Vietnam some as well, and I think some may still be in the SF inventory, but I am not sure. The non silenced ones, from what I have read, were not issued to military but were either used for competition or training. Even the civilian ones were called HD military,but I can not remember the reason why they were called military.

Here is mine

http://i24.photobucket.com/albums/c29/DM1975/Hi%20Standard/Hi-Standard.jpg

Edited by DM1975, 25 September 2009 - 01:56 PM.


#7 Whisky Beck

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Posted 25 September 2009 - 08:48 PM

Not only the OSS used silenced High Standard 22s during WWII, so did the Marines and probably other special op units. My father served with the Marine V Amphibious Corps in Amphibious Recon during WWII. He told me he had used a silenced Heavy Barrel High Standard 22 automatic on a number of pre-invasion recon operations. He never did say if they were long or short barreled or if the silencer was built in or removable. He did tell me he wished he had brought it home which would have been extremely easy due to the very lax way weapons and equipment were handled for survey at the end of the Pacific War.

Yours is a nice example of the High Standard. I would like to find an copy just as clean.

WB

Edited by Whisky Beck, 25 September 2009 - 08:52 PM.


#8 gunbarrel

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Posted 26 September 2009 - 02:44 AM

This is one of my dad's new finds. He just bought this last weekend. When he called me to tell me about his find, he was so excited. I think this is the first military Hi-Standard he has ever owned. I think he did pretty well.


I'd say! NICE!!! :thumbsup:

#9 J_Andrews

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Posted 26 September 2009 - 12:17 PM

The post-war, civilian-market, commercial ones marked "MILITARY" were so marked to differentiate them form the old style, pre-war variants. That is, the "commecial pattern of 1946" incorporated the changes in design made for the military during the war.

The key here is that the gun bears the U.S. Property and Ordnance marks, so it is NOT made for civilian buyers.

The Hi-Standard and Colt Woodsman and some Rugers were used with suppressors by the military and CIA in the VN war era. The Colts were seemed most numerous.

#10 DM1975

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Posted 26 September 2009 - 12:39 PM

The post-war, civilian-market, commercial ones marked "MILITARY" were so marked to differentiate them form the old style, pre-war variants. That is, the "commecial pattern of 1946" incorporated the changes in design made for the military during the war.

The key here is that the gun bears the U.S. Property and Ordnance marks, so it is NOT made for civilian buyers.

The Hi-Standard and Colt Woodsman and some Rugers were used with suppressors by the military and CIA in the VN war era. The Colts were seemed most numerous.


NIce to find more info out about these. I dug as much as I could when I got mine, but could not find any"for sure" answers. I knew the one I had was a civilian version, but the US property marked ones withouth supressors always escaped me as no one could tell me their ppurpose. I was told by some they were used for practice, and by others that they were used by the shooting team, and by others that they were used as loaner guns at recreational shooting ranges on post. I suppose that all of these may be true, but I sure would like to hear more info on it.

#11 Charlie Flick

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 12:22 PM

Hi Arch:

Your dad made a nice pickup there. It looks to be in good shape and unmessed with.

A clarification is needed here. What you have is a "military" H-D, but not an "H-D Military". I will explain.

Your pistol is actually known as the "Model USA H-D". The .22 Model H-D was developed by the High Standard Manufacturing Co. around 1940 for the civilian market. When the War started the US military found itself in dire need of training pistols, as the M1911A1 pistols were in short supply. In addition to the Model B pistol High Standard offered the military the H-D. A slightly modified version of the H-D was accepted and designated as the Model USA H-D. The main differences between it and the earlier civilian gun were the slightly heavier 4.5 inch barrel, the markings, and the elimination of target sights in favor of fixed sights. Sources vary on the total production but somewhere between 32,000 and 44,000 units were manufactured during the War. Very few changes were made during the War. Around serial number 128,000 the finish changed from blued to parkerized.

There was indeed a silenced version of the USA H-D made during the War. It was known as the "USA H-D MS". Only around 2600 were made. Today these guns in civilian hands are restricted by the National Firearms Act. BTW, this was the pistol in the possession of Francis Gary Powers when his U2 aircraft was shot down by the Soviets.

Following the end of the War, High Standard resumed civilian pistol production with the introduction of the "H-D Military" .22 pistol. The differences between it and the earlier war time guns were its blued finish, barrels available in two lengths, markings changed, and a resumption of target sights. About 150,000 were made during its production lifetime. DM1975 shows us a nice example of this civilian gun above.

Anyway, that is the short version of the story on these guns. Hope it clarifies the picture for you. They are neat guns.

Regards,
Charlie Flick

#12 DM1975

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Posted 27 September 2009 - 12:29 PM

Thanks for that bit of knowledge. I am glad someone knew the history of them.

#13 AEM

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Posted 06 October 2009 - 01:37 PM

Very nice!!

Edited by AEM, 06 October 2009 - 01:38 PM.



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