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M1911A1 - Colt


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#1 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 04:26 PM

Hi everyone, I decided to buy a metal 1911 Colt .45 airsoft gun because i cannot afford a real one because i am only 15 and i dont have a job, to fill my holster. It came in the mail the other day, and then today My Father, my brother and i went to a gun show, and i got two modern 1911 mags for 9 bucks each, and i found WW2 dated '43 1911 ammo in the original 50 cartridge box for 25.00. I opened the box of ammo and the ammo was a little dirty, and i was wondering if i should clean or should i leave as is. Also i only took out 14 rounds to fill the mags, should i take all of the rounds out to check for leaking cartridges and there was tape on the flaps to the ammo and i cut that, i was wondering if that devalued it and if the tape was original to the box? Also, i bought 10 m1 garand clips to fill my m1 garand belt, any markings that would be on them that would indicate ww2? Some marking i can see are AGE 1. So my question is what would the marking be for wwii on the clips and is wwii era 30.06 ammo expensive?

Anyways im a happy camper and i think it will look good with my field gear.
Here's the pictures.

coltpistoldisplay.jpg

#2 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 04:31 PM

Everything in their holster/pouch
pistolrig.jpg
43 dated
43ammo.jpg
The round looks silverish any reason for that? Just patina?
boxandround.jpg

Edited by WW2 History Buff, 30 August 2009 - 04:32 PM.


#3 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 04:35 PM

Last of the pictures,
ammoinbox.jpg
and the m1 clips you can kind of see the markings on them.
m1garandclips.jpg
m1garandclips2.jpg

#4 mrhell

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 04:54 PM

Hello, nice finds you have there. Personally I like the ammo. :w00t: :jeal0001:

You can look up your enbloc clip markings at this web site: http://members.bella...lips/clips.html

#5 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 05:39 PM

Thanks! Me too! Thanks for that link seems like i have mostly AGE 1 - Aggressive Engineering Corp (Millitary contract) marked enbloc clips.
Thanks again,
Haydn

Edit: I know i might be a little over worried on this, but heres a pic of the tape i had to cut to get to the ammo, is the tape original to the box and is it a big deal that i cut it?
ammotape.jpg

Edited by WW2 History Buff, 30 August 2009 - 05:42 PM.


#6 hotlead

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Posted 30 August 2009 - 07:13 PM

It looks like regular scotch tape to me, and those look like steel cased .45s to me, nice find.

#7 Misanthropic_Gods

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 05:02 AM

Hey man, its all about you! If you wanted the box open, and it doesnt matter to you that it isnt "Supar mint, crazy cool, $$$ unopened WW2 RARE!" like some ebay sellers would try to let you believe, then just enjoy it. Enjoy the history, and enjoy the item itself. These boxes float around and its not like they are a one-of thing, they did produce millions of rounds of ammo during the war. the most satisyfying thing about this stuff is when it makes you happy to have and to play with it, hell some guys even shoot this stuff after 60 some odd years (I wouldnt reccomend it). Plus im guessing the tape was put on by the seller so he wouldnt have 60 year old live ammo rolling around all over the place.

nice holster BTW, looks nice!

Edited by Misanthropic_Gods, 31 August 2009 - 05:06 AM.


#8 Blake_E

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 08:00 AM

Nice gear mate, i like the patina to the holster, what make is it?

#9 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 03:47 PM

Thanks for all the comments, and Misanthropic_Gods your right thanks for those comments.
And the holster is a Graton & Knight CO. '43
Thanks again for the comments,
Haydn

Edit: When i first opened the box of ammo, i thought they were steel cased, but later they kinda look brass. So i compared old ww2 brass shells to the ammo and it seems like they are steel cased with tarnish/dirt on them. But just to be sure anyway to tell?

Edited by WW2 History Buff, 31 August 2009 - 03:53 PM.


#10 Varangian

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 04:01 PM

Edit: When i first opened the box of ammo, i thought they were steel cased, but later they kinda look brass. So i compared old ww2 brass shells to the ammo and it seems like they are steel cased with tarnish/dirt on them. But just to be sure anyway to tell?


Magnet.

#11 bayonetman

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 04:24 PM

"I opened the box of ammo and the ammo was a little dirty, and i was wondering if i should clean or should i leave as is. Also i only took out 14 rounds to fill the mags, should i take all of the rounds out to check for leaking cartridges?"

Your .45 cartridges are steel cased with a thin coating of zinc chromate (as I recall) to protect the steel from rusting. If this coating fails, the case can begin to rust quickly. I certainly would check them all. DO NOT use any sort of abrasive material on them as the coating is quite thin and comes off easily. One collector friend of mine used paste car wax on his to prevent further deterioration.

ECS is Evansville Chrysler Sunbeam of Evansville, Indiana, 1943 production. The S was the Sunbeam appliance plant which made the cases, if I remember correctly the cases were taken across town and loaded at the Evansville Chrysler plant. You also may want to check the bullets with a magnet as some of this ammunition was loaded with copper plated steel jacketed bullets. Not that I think you would, but DON'T shoot this ammunition. It is loaded with corrosive primers, and I have heard of some of the steel cases cracking when fired. Some shooters reported hard extraction and broken extractors with steel case .45.

"Is wwii era 30.06 ammo expensive?"

These days it can run up to $1.00 a round although sometimes a deal can be found. During a good part of WW2 Armor Piercing ammunition (black bullet tip) was commonly issued for combat use to help penetrate "light cover". Ball cartridges were normally reserved for training and other non-combat use but a lot was used in combat areas especially earlier in the war. Small amounts of tracer were often issued to ground troops so that someone could pinpoint a target for other weapons by firing some tracer at the target. So you could legitimately use ball, AP, and tracer in your display.

Glad to see more young people getting interested. I was about your age when I started getting really into militaria (about 50+ years ago!). In those days ammunition was quite cheap - if we had to pay 5 cents a shot we felt it was pretty expensive. Can't tell you how much WW2 ammunition we shot up in the 1950s and 60s.

#12 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 04:43 PM

Magnet.

Ah silly me lol Thanks!
Haydn

"I opened the box of ammo and the ammo was a little dirty, and i was wondering if i should clean or should i leave as is. Also i only took out 14 rounds to fill the mags, should i take all of the rounds out to check for leaking cartridges?"

Your .45 cartridges are steel cased with a thin coating of zinc chromate (as I recall) to protect the steel from rusting. If this coating fails, the case can begin to rust quickly. I certainly would check them all. DO NOT use any sort of abrasive material on them as the coating is quite thin and comes off easily. One collector friend of mine used paste car wax on his to prevent further deterioration.

ECS is Evansville Chrysler Sunbeam of Evansville, Indiana, 1943 production. The S was the Sunbeam appliance plant which made the cases, if I remember correctly the cases were taken across town and loaded at the Evansville Chrysler plant. You also may want to check the bullets with a magnet as some of this ammunition was loaded with copper plated steel jacketed bullets. Not that I think you would, but DON'T shoot this ammunition. It is loaded with corrosive primers, and I have heard of some of the steel cases cracking when fired. Some shooters reported hard extraction and broken extractors with steel case .45.

"Is wwii era 30.06 ammo expensive?"

These days it can run up to $1.00 a round although sometimes a deal can be found. During a good part of WW2 Armor Piercing ammunition (black bullet tip) was commonly issued for combat use to help penetrate "light cover". Ball cartridges were normally reserved for training and other non-combat use but a lot was used in combat areas especially earlier in the war. Small amounts of tracer were often issued to ground troops so that someone could pinpoint a target for other weapons by firing some tracer at the target. So you could legitimately use ball, AP, and tracer in your display.

Glad to see more young people getting interested. I was about your age when I started getting really into militaria (about 50+ years ago!). In those days ammunition was quite cheap - if we had to pay 5 cents a shot we felt it was pretty expensive. Can't tell you how much WW2 ammunition we shot up in the 1950s and 60s.

Thanks for all this information! i appreciate it! And im pretty sure ill never be shooting it so no worries. I was gonna buy single rounds of wwii .45 from a bucket for a dollar a piece, but then i found this box with 50 of them for half of that price. And my Dad said we can go to the Harrisburg Gun Show but im not sure when that is, so hopefully that one will be better then the one i was just at. And that is crazy, i wish i could just step in a surplus store from that time for a while and just gander at everything and maybe get some good deals :lol: And when i tell people i collect this stuff, some are like why waste your money? and some say, thats cool i would of never thought that you would collect that kind of stuff.

Thanks again,
Haydn

Edit: you mentioned that if the zinc coating gets scractched off/ect. that it will rust, i noticed that when i put the ammo in the mags that they got scratched up just a little bit, are those scratches going to do anything and should i worry? I know i might sound like a worrybug but i just want to make sure my little investment doesnt get all rusted :thumbdown:

Edited by WW2 History Buff, 31 August 2009 - 04:55 PM.


#13 Varangian

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 04:43 PM

I was about your age when I started getting really into militaria (about 50+ years ago!). In those days ammunition was quite cheap - if we had to pay 5 cents a shot we felt it was pretty expensive.


5 cents a shot is, adjusted for 50 years of inflation, about what we pay today....

#14 Corpl. Cleaver

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 05:03 PM

Haydn,

If I were you I wouldn't keep the mags full, I hear it will mess up the spring after awhile.

Tyler

#15 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 05:12 PM

Haydn,

If I were you I wouldn't keep the mags full, I hear it will mess up the spring after awhile.

Tyler


Thanks for this info, im not too familiar with firearms and their accessories, i dont wanna ruin my 9 dollar mags!! :lol:
Haydn

#16 Justin

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 05:28 PM

Nice, how much was the .45?

#17 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 05:33 PM

The .45 was i think 14.99 on ebay plus 11.00 shipping<--:thumbdown: It looks great and feels great(except the orange band) but it is a pretty bad shooter in my opinion.
Haydn

#18 bayonetman

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Posted 31 August 2009 - 06:25 PM

Haydn,

If I were you I wouldn't keep the mags full, I hear it will mess up the spring after awhile.

Tyler


Although I do agree with the advice, good springs will not take a "set" for several years. Many serious shooters will have two sets of magazines, and will rotate their use every few months.

Having said that, I bought a WW1 Officer's grouping some years ago, and found two M1911 magazines in a pouch loaded with F A 16 cartridges. From all I could find out, they had been put away loaded like that in 1919 when he returned from the war, and had never been unloaded for over 75 years. I reloaded them with current ammunition and tried them out and never had a problem.

#19 hotlead

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 02:41 PM

Good quality mags with good quality springs should have no problem being loaded for a long time. A spring will not wear out from being compressed, they are rated for cycles not time length of compression, Swapping mags around, unloading some, loading others, and repeating every month will wear out your springs faster than anything.

If you really have USGI mags, don't worry, your grandkids will have a great time using them at the range. If you're still hesitant about loading them up to display, just put two rounds in 'em so it looks good.

My opinion, load 'em up and keep 'em that way, remember.......loaded mags are happy mags :thumbsup:

#20 artu44

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Posted 01 September 2009 - 10:01 PM

A lttle suggestion. Check local laws and, at least for pics, remove the horrible red plug from barrel.

#21 Psychman

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 04:31 AM

[quote name='hotlead' post='387669' date='Sep 1 2009, 02:41 PM']Good quality mags with good quality springs should have no problem being loaded for a long time. A spring will not wear out from being compressed, they are rated for cycles not time length of compression, Swapping mags around, unloading some, loading others, and repeating every month will wear out your springs faster than anything.




Agreed. Don't worry about having your mags loaded up for years if you want.

Edited by Psychman, 02 September 2009 - 04:32 AM.


#22 ponyradish

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 05:28 AM

A lttle suggestion. Check local laws and, at least for pics, remove the horrible red plug from barrel.

The red plug should stay.A fifteen year old kid with a 45 look-alike could get him shot.Pony.

#23 Psychman

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 10:00 AM

The red plug should stay.A fifteen year old kid with a 45 look-alike could get him shot.Pony.



Artu simply suggested he remove it for the pictures as long as this does not violate local laws. The rest of the time he can keep the plug in. Nobody suggested he roam around town with the thing.

#24 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 06:16 PM

I dont ever plan to use the mags to shoot with so no worries =] also i tried to take off the orange plug, but it is farther in the barrel then it looks, and i understand where artu is coming from because it does look horrible, and like i said i tried to take it off haha, and i got it for display so it will either always be in the holster or used in a display. And if anyone has any suggestions on how to take off the orange plug without ripping out the barrel please let me know. As far as the local laws im not entirely sure but like i said its gonna be in the holster.

Thanks for the suggestions/comments,
Haydn

#25 Varangian

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 08:35 PM

And if anyone has any suggestions on how to take off the orange plug without ripping out the barrel please let me know. As far as the local laws im not entirely sure but like i said its gonna be in the holster.


I took a hacksaw to take the plug off my airsoft cat-zinger. Still had an orange ring on the front, which a Sharpie took care of.


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