Jump to content


Photo

Hardtack, hard tack biscuits


  • Please log in to reply
14 replies to this topic

#1 robinb

robinb

    MODERATOR

  • Moderators
    • Member ID: 61
  • 5,221 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Turner, Oregon

Posted 11 July 2009 - 07:41 PM

I bought this 1880's meat can years ago at a flea market for $2. The seller apoligized for the food that was still in it. I told him not to worry about it.
can_2.JPG
can_3.JPG

#2 doyler

doyler
  • Members
    • Member ID: 342
  • 33,740 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Under The Bridge

Posted 11 July 2009 - 07:53 PM

Robin,
I also have a meat can with a piece of hard tack in it.I got this in a WW1 88th Division group.

RD

#3 Varangian

Varangian
  • Members
    • Member ID: 1,047
  • 1,628 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Hill Country, Texas

Posted 12 July 2009 - 05:26 AM

Sooo...

Does it taste as bad as the history books say?

#4 Bob Hudson

Bob Hudson

    Forum Co-Founder (Ret)

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 2
  • 26,617 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 12 July 2009 - 07:40 AM

Sooo...

Does it taste as bad as the history books say?


I just picked up a couple of pieces of WWI hardtack this past week: while I have cooked up some MRE's to see how they taste, and as a kid opened up some cans of C rations, I think I'll have to pass on the 90-year-old hardtack. :pinch:

#5 New Romantic

New Romantic
  • Members
    • Member ID: 599
  • 1,768 posts

Posted 12 July 2009 - 02:50 PM

I bought this 1880's meat can years ago at a flea market for $2. The seller apoligized for the food that was still in it. I told him not to worry about it.


Interesting, I'm surprised the seller didn't decide to toss out the hard tack.

#6 Brian Keith

Brian Keith
  • Members
    • Member ID: 1,549
  • 3,626 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Portland, Indiana, USA

Posted 12 July 2009 - 05:53 PM

Great Find!
BKW

#7 Bob Hudson

Bob Hudson

    Forum Co-Founder (Ret)

  • Administrators
    • Member ID: 2
  • 26,617 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 15 July 2009 - 08:35 PM

So, does not anyone know what size and shape of hardtack was issued by the US in WWI? These came from what I believe is a WWI ditty bag:

hardtack.jpg

#8 topdcnut

topdcnut
  • Members
    • Member ID: 2,723
  • 1,512 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Westshore of the Midwest sea

Posted 16 July 2009 - 04:22 AM

Some times you see this stuff with with dates, events and ships names on them in ink. To bad the soldier did not do the same with this . The last navy one I saw was named and dated to a cruiser that participated in the SpanAm war it went for almost 200.00 either way it is nice to see this stuff.

John

#9 MattOravik

MattOravik
  • Members
    • Member ID: 137
  • 1,927 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Planet earth, USA

Posted 16 July 2009 - 07:07 PM

Wow that's really neat! I made some hardtack before from a recipe I found on the net. It was very hard and tasteless..

-Matt.

#10 Keystone

Keystone
  • Members
    • Member ID: 192
  • 924 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 16 July 2009 - 07:40 PM

"So, does not anyone know what size and shape of hardtack was issued by the US in WWI?"


AGM had an original box of hard bread on their web site a few months back. As I recall it went for $1200.00. I asked the size of the box and they replied 8" x 2 1/4" x 2 1/4".
Assuming a little space on the sides of the box I would guess the cracker itself would be 2 inches square.
Tim

#11 FTrooper

FTrooper
  • Members
    • Member ID: 6,873
  • 67 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Moscow, Idaho

Posted 23 July 2009 - 02:49 AM

Interesting topic...or at least I think so.

There is an original piece of hardbread or "hard tack" at Sharlot Hall that was carried by a Rough Rider, it is a round sea-biscuit type as pictured above.

I have also seen a type with is a rectangle. Its about the width of a standard square piece, but is about 50% longer! I believe it to be from the 1900-1910 era before the Army went to the boxed hardbread from what little evidence I have. It was associated with a collection of items from that era.

Chris Fischer

Attached Images

  • hardtack.JPG


#12 BEAST

BEAST
  • Members
    • Member ID: 203
  • 10,261 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:INDIANA

Posted 23 July 2009 - 04:51 AM

Here is a photo of a piece of hardtack on display at Love Field in Dallas, TX. This piece of hardtack was issued around 1917.

The thread on Love Field can be found here: http://www.usmilitar...p;hl=love field

Attached Images

  • LOVE_FIELD_HARD_TACK.jpg


#13 Keystone

Keystone
  • Members
    • Member ID: 192
  • 924 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Philadelphia

Posted 23 July 2009 - 11:05 AM

Found the photo from AGM's website

Attached Images

  • V43903_5.jpg


#14 jagjetta

jagjetta

    Sponsor

  • SPONSOR
    • Member ID: 949
  • 1,366 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota USA

Posted 23 July 2009 - 07:10 PM

So, does not anyone know what size and shape of hardtack was issued by the US in WWI? These came from what I believe is a WWI ditty bag:

hardtack.jpg


The piece on the left appears to be a piece of German issue hardbread (assuming it is about 11cm in diameter). The Bill Combs collection had a piece with provenance and was stamped in the center with a "WJ" cypher. AGM sold the better part of the Combs collection of Imperial goods in it catalog 76 this past February.

John A-G
Editor, Military Trader

#15 Shenkursk

Shenkursk

    MODERATOR / SPONSOR

  • Senior Moderators
    • Member ID: 183
  • 967 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 24 July 2009 - 06:31 AM

The expensive part of that last batch of hardtack that we had was the box. The tinned iron sealed hardtack rations are actually fairly common, and can be had for between $200 and $300 depending on condition.

For fun, here are some others for comparison. I know this is a US forum, but as shown above - doughboys would end up with foreign rations.

Posted Image
WWI British hardtack biscuit with soldier's souvenir inscription.

Posted Image
German WWI hardbread ration

Posted Image
French WWI Hardtack Ration and issue container

Posted Image
Pre-war US hardbread ration. Each soldier carried two of these in his pack, along with a canned meat 'emergency ration' and the regular meat ration inside his bacon can.

Posted Image
WWI US hardbread ration. Same contents as the pasteboard container above, but packaged in a solder sealed tinned iron container. This was found to be necessary to protect the ration from being spoiled by poison gas fumes.

Posted Image
And just for grins, the US emergency ration.


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users