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1919-1941 vintage pilot wings


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#101 guerrap

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Posted 14 February 2011 - 05:19 PM

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And the backside with the replaced "C" style catch.
Also, in reference to the comment of it looking massive and "does it weigh as much as it looks?" Because it is a bit hollowed out as seen on the back view, it is not as heavy as it may appear. Thanks for the question! Pete

#102 CliffP

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Posted 21 March 2011 - 01:35 PM

:think:

This portrait might raise an eyebrow or two.

Colonel Phillip Schneeburger wearing a 1919 balloon pilot badge made by William Link & Company with gold letters US added to its shield. Although he is wearing a very early badge, this picture is dated 9-17-1938.

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#103 CliffP

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 04:28 AM

Capt. Horace N. Heisen (1928)

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#104 John Cooper

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 07:27 PM

Thanks Cliff - what an excellet photo and source of information for the collector.

Cheers
John

#105 tom63

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Posted 07 December 2012 - 01:05 PM

Question on dating vintage pilot's wings if I may; I bought these wings recently (very similar to the wings pictured in post #60) thinking the were a fairly recent vintage. My reasoning was the dimple or raised dot on the anchor fluke. When I researched Marine EGA's here on this forum, one of the tell tale signs of a newer EGA was the dimple on the anchor. While looking on this topic, it appears that most wings have that dimple on the anchor fluke, no matter the vintage. So, the dimple is no indication of age with wings? Any idea of when my wings were made?

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#106 Flightpath

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Posted 10 January 2013 - 02:23 PM

Hi tom63,

I think I bid against you for these, I thought they might be 1930s or earlier (the style looked like it), before I bid I emailed John Vargas and asked him, he replied that they were probably WW2, there were a lot of wings that were struck useing older dies during WW2, that is what makes dateing some wings and other badges (marksmanship awards for example) a bit hard......... and of course that also means they could be older!

cheers,

-John

Edited by Flightpath, 10 January 2013 - 02:27 PM.


#107 rathbonemuseum.com

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 05:02 PM

I thought I would add some new material to Patrick's excellent thread (not to be confused with his excellent adventure...whole nother story).

I think the best guide to pattern is to look at period photos prior to 1941 as you know they could not have worn any of the later styles during this time and pictures would likely represent what was common. For many reasons, an early wing could have been worn later.

US Airship Pilots in period photos.

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#108 rathbonemuseum.com

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 05:05 PM

GEN Clarence Tinker (at that time COL) in his M1938 dress blues wearing a senior pilot wing.

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#109 rathbonemuseum.com

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Posted 25 February 2013 - 05:09 PM

1928 regulation Flying Cadet uniform with full size gold bullion instructor wing. These slate blue uniforms went out of style for the majority of flight cadets as they transitioned into the enlarged training program but continued to be worn by seniors for parades up until 1940.

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#110 Uniforms of the Day

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Posted 16 March 2013 - 11:43 AM

Very informative thread. Thanks for posting these!

#111 rathbonemuseum.com

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 02:43 PM

We can't let this thread go quiet. Adding some more wings to ponder. Not mine but I wish they were!

 

First is another example of Patrick's "hairy pattern". Was it determined that these are William Link or from the Amcraft die in Cliff's post?

 

 

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#112 rathbonemuseum.com

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 02:45 PM

Another great wing is this style which I have not seen posted here and not with the AMICO hallmark. Is this the predecessor to the later, simpler three tiered wing pattern? Are we seeing the evolution of the AMICO style?

 

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#113 rathbonemuseum.com

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 02:47 PM

And finally, my personal favorite and "holy grail" target which I may never acquire (though I have said that about other things I have been lucky enough to find), a beautiful pilot wing made by the A. H. Hankins jeweler of Seattle, WA. Simply amazing.

 

 

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#114 John Cooper

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Posted 22 December 2013 - 09:53 PM

I can see why the last photo is a grail for you. Beautiful feathering and shoulder details which totally steals the show when compared to the rather pedestrian shield. I have to say I really appreciate the designs that artistically represent actual wings.

Cheers

#115 B-17Guy

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Posted 23 December 2013 - 08:10 AM

We can't let this thread go quiet. Adding some more wings to ponder. Not mine but I wish they were!

 

First is another example of Patrick's "hairy pattern". Was it determined that these are William Link or from the Amcraft die in Cliff's post?

 

 

 

Hey Tod,

 

This wing is actually a Link pattern badge.

Amcraft acquired the dies from Wm Link Co sometime in the mid-late 1920's and produced

the wing up through early WWII, but with a snowflake back.

Both are rather hard to find, the smooth backed Link and the snowflake backed Amcraft.

 

John
 



#116 pfrost

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 08:25 AM

This is a recent addition.  A wonderful bullion wing, likely from the late 1920's- early 1930's.  Tentatively, this has been ID'd to a guy who went on to serve at the commanding officer of a fighter wing in the ETO.

 

The bullion work is stunning, the used a couple of different styles of metal thread and silver foil.

 

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#117 pfrost

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 08:26 AM

Close up of the wing

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  • bullion30wing2a.jpg


#118 pfrost

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Posted 23 May 2014 - 08:28 AM

Final picture showing some of the detail in the shield.

 

I have found that the bullion wings of this era are some of the nicest available (and the rarest).

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#119 rustywings

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Posted 24 May 2014 - 10:11 AM

Patrick, that's a stunning between-the-wars bullion Pilot wing!  I r-e-a-l-l-y like the individual flair and artistry they put into these oversize Pilot wings...  

 

Russ



#120 B-17Guy

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Posted 25 May 2014 - 04:16 AM

Great details to a very nice wing badge.

Thanks for adding to one of the best and most informative threads in this forum.

 

John



#121 rustywings

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 09:52 AM

Somewhat similar to Patrick's nice addition posted above, here's another oversize 1920's - 1930's bullion US Army Pilot wing. Unfortunately, the prop/wing collar insignia are missing and the uniform is riddled with moth track damage, but the 4.25 inch wide bullion wings are in surprisingly good shape.

  

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#122 rustywings

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 09:54 AM

Close-up of the bullion wings:

 

  

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#123 rustywings

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 09:58 AM

Label on the inside pocket indicates this coat belonged to Lt. W. G. Edwards and is dated January 22, 1931.

 

 

 

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#124 pfrost

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Posted 16 June 2014 - 05:42 PM

Stunning wing.  One of my favorites.

 

P



#125 CliffP

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Posted 23 June 2014 - 01:52 PM

Major General Frederick L. Martin (O2507) (November 26, 1882 - February 23, 1954) was assigned to take command of USAAC Hawaii based units stationed there on October 4, 1940. 

 

Note that in this picture he is wearing a very nice pre-WW2 wing badge made by Orber.

 

Cliff

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  • Army Air Force Major General Frederick L. Martin arrived in Honolulu on the US Army Transport Leonard Wood 2 November 1940, to take command of Hawaii-based USAAF units..jpg



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