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WHAT TO DO WITH WW2 HISTORICAL PURPLE HEART ?

Started by Dom Pastore Jr. , May 28 2009 01:52 PM

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#1 Dom Pastore Jr.

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 01:52 PM

Hello Guys,

I've been pondering what to do with an item in my collection, and just can't seem to make a firm decision about it. I would really like to sell or trade it off, for something more in line with what I collect, but I realize that if I do part with it, I'll probably never get a chance to own anything as historically important. ( And yes, I could really use the extra cash at the moment ! ) Now, in addition to having "seller's regret", & truly hating myself for getting rid of it, there's also the question of wether I should donate or loan it to be displayed somewhere, due to it's direct link with a very historical event. So, I guess my options consist of the following; 1) I can sell it or perhaps trade it for another item of interest along the lines of what I collect. 2) Just keep it, knowing that it will most probably increase in value. 3) Donate, or perhaps loan it to someplace it can be properly displayed as a true piece of WW2 memorabilia. So, do any of my fellow collectors have any ideas as to what I should do ?? Although some may feel that the object isn't really any spectacular piece of memorabilia, it does have a direct connection to a spectacular event in USMC history, so taken in that respect, it is at the least an unusual, very seldom offered item. If I'm overestimating it's historical significance, PLEASE advise, as that's one of reasons for this posting. OK, what is it ?? It's an all original USMC / WW2 - WIA Purple Heart Medal ( USN, Type 1, in original purple coffin case, including a 1/2" PHM RB w/ large gold star affixed. / unnamed, as issued ) The medal is accompanied by it's original transmittal letter, dated March 20, 1945, at the USN Hosp., Navy # 10, for wounds on Iwo Jima, Feb. 21, 1945. The recipient was WIA twice while on Iwo, but the PH letter only lists Feb. 21st. ( Although I do have copies of both his USMC Injury Cards, which document both wounds received. ) OK, it's a WW2, USMC - WIA Purple Heart with the original letter, so what ? The recipient, a PFC, was a former Marine Paratrooper ( Co. K, 3rd Marine Para. Bn.) who was assigned to the 2nd Platoon, of Co. E, 2nd Bn., 28th Marines ( 5th Div.) He was involved in many historic events while on Iwo, & is listed by name in 6 publications, in addition to being interviewed for & shown on the A&E Video Documentary, "The Heroes Of Iwo Jima", hosted by Gene Hackman. The recipient was very good friends with Iwo "Flag Raisers" Ira Hayes, Mike Strank, & Harlan Block. I'm fairly certain that he wasn't among the 1st or 2nd patrol up Suribachi the day they raised the flag ( Feb. 23rd ) but I'm sure he couldn't have been very far away. He may have remained below with the rest of E Co.'s 2nd Platoon, or he may have been still at the Divisional Surgical HQ, as he was WIA for the 1st time of Feb. 21st. He was RTD after that wound, but was WIA again on March 5th, & that one took him out of the fight for good. On March 8th he was evacuated out, & eneded up at the Pearl Harbor USN Hospital, where he was awarded his PHM on March 20th, 1945. OK. enough for the history, WHAT should I do with the Heart ?? I'm just interested in hearing what some of my fellow collectors would do with it, if it were theirs. As always, any & all replies will be very much appreciated. THANKS


Regards, dpast32

#2 swabbie

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 02:16 PM

Dom, if it were mine and my collecting interest did not include the medal, I would be inclined to trade it for something equally difficult to find (the documentation is what makes this medal significant). That way, I could get something that I probably couldn’t buy and would be making two people happy – me and the other guy who would dearly love it. If I were aware of a museum (or related public display) that I felt would display the medal in a respectful way honoring the recipient and the event (and the medal and documentation would not someday “go out the back door”), I might loan it to them. Donation is good if they meet the aforementioned criteria and I needed a tax deduction. Money only if I really needed it now. HTH.

#3 Rakkasan187

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 02:29 PM

I would keep the award and any other information or items that would accompany this piece. Any books or references that name this individual should also be put with the item. I would be hesitant to offer it to a museum, but if you were to part with it, I would suggest the Marine Corps Museum. Again, I would be concerned that it would dissapear into the storage vaults if it were donated to a museum. If you can do research on this item and find out if any relatives are still living, they may be able to add to the medal itself, with maybe his uniform, insignia, or any other items that could be obtained to add to this collection. It sounds like you have a great one of a kind piece.

I have several items in my collection that I do not focus on, but I have held onto them due to their historical significance. IMHO, I say hold onto it!!

Good luck with your decision.

MSG Leigh E Smith Jr
US Army (retired) 84/05

#4 ASMIC2971

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 02:33 PM

I also agree that the documentation is what makes this medal steller. If it were me I would hold onto it until I found another collector who would be willing to trade for something I wanted. I know myself enough to know that if I sold it I would immediatly have sellers remorse. You are in a catch-22 situation. Good luck with your course of action

#5 normaninvasion

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 03:11 PM

Ive had this battle many times. Ive parted with cool family items, non military, because they were to valuable or would be better appreciated by someone with that interest. I would love to have kept these things but I wasn't passionate about them and wouldn't be giving them a proper home. If you think that the PH might be of interest to your collection in the future, keep it, you will never get it back. But if it will never be given a special place and doesn't hold much attraction, find a buyer or museum that will pay a good price or give it a good home http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif

#6 ADAM2001

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Posted 28 May 2009 - 03:28 PM

Hello Guys,

I've been pondering what to do with an item in my collection, and just can't seem to make a firm decision about it. I would really like to sell or trade it off, for something more in line with what I collect, but I realize that if I do part with it, I'll probably never get a chance to own anything as historically important. ( And yes, I could really use the extra cash at the moment ! ) Now, in addition to having "seller's regret", & truly hating myself for getting rid of it, there's also the question of wether I should donate or loan it to be displayed somewhere, due to it's direct link with a very historical event. So, I guess my options consist of the following; 1) I can sell it or perhaps trade it for another item of interest along the lines of what I collect. 2) Just keep it, knowing that it will most probably increase in value. 3) Donate, or perhaps loan it to someplace it can be properly displayed as a true piece of WW2 memorabilia. So, do any of my fellow collectors have any ideas as to what I should do ?? Although some may feel that the object isn't really any spectacular piece of memorabilia, it does have a direct connection to a spectacular event in USMC history, so taken in that respect, it is at the least an unusual, very seldom offered item. If I'm overestimating it's historical significance, PLEASE advise, as that's one of reasons for this posting. OK, what is it ?? It's an all original USMC / WW2 - WIA Purple Heart Medal ( USN, Type 1, in original purple coffin case, including a 1/2" PHM RB w/ large gold star affixed. / unnamed, as issued ) The medal is accompanied by it's original transmittal letter, dated March 20, 1945, at the USN Hosp., Navy # 10, for wounds on Iwo Jima, Feb. 21, 1945. The recipient was WIA twice while on Iwo, but the PH letter only lists Feb. 21st. ( Although I do have copies of both his USMC Injury Cards, which document both wounds received. ) OK, it's a WW2, USMC - WIA Purple Heart with the original letter, so what ? The recipient, a PFC, was a former Marine Paratrooper ( Co. K, 3rd Marine Para. Bn.) who was assigned to the 2nd Platoon, of Co. E, 2nd Bn., 28th Marines ( 5th Div.) He was involved in many historic events while on Iwo, & is listed by name in 6 publications, in addition to being interviewed for & shown on the A&E Video Documentary, "The Heroes Of Iwo Jima", hosted by Gene Hackman. The recipient was very good friends with Iwo "Flag Raisers" Ira Hayes, Mike Strank, & Harlan Block. I'm fairly certain that he wasn't among the 1st or 2nd patrol up Suribachi the day they raised the flag ( Feb. 23rd ) but I'm sure he couldn't have been very far away. He may have remained below with the rest of E Co.'s 2nd Platoon, or he may have been still at the Divisional Surgical HQ, as he was WIA for the 1st time of Feb. 21st. He was RTD after that wound, but was WIA again on March 5th, & that one took him out of the fight for good. On March 8th he was evacuated out, & eneded up at the Pearl Harbor USN Hospital, where he was awarded his PHM on March 20th, 1945. OK. enough for the history, WHAT should I do with the Heart ?? I'm just interested in hearing what some of my fellow collectors would do with it, if it were theirs. As always, any & all replies will be very much appreciated. THANKS


Regards, dpast32



If it belonged to me although I'm not really into USMC items, I would be thinking of either the USMC Museum in Quantico, VA or maybe Parris Island. BEFORE anyone "bashes" me on the pitfalls, and problems about museums, artifacts, and displays, I was just thinking that an item of this historical nature DOES NEED to be in a place when it can be seen and appreciated by others for the future, and how "cool" it would be for a NEW BOOT coming into the Corps to be able to experience and identify with piece of REAL HISTORY virtually at their fingertips (not literally) and the story associated with the recipient.

I myself recently received a deceased family member's awards that were earned on D-DAY, and although they are with some other items that have documented provenance and WILL NEVER BE SOLD while I am alive, I have spoken to some individuals and do plan on doing a rotating LOAN to a few various museums (US Infantry Museum, 29th & 1st Divisions, etc.) where others can see them. Although I never actually KNEW my uncle, the fact remains that he is FAMILY, and these items are part of his legacy that will live on forever and how proud I am to have them in my possession.

I was actually talking to an active duty Colonel just last week during a local Memorial Day event and commented how I hadn't see Ft. Benning since I left Jump School there in 1980. Once the subject of D-Day was brought up, I mentioned my uncle, met the officer at his hotel with my uncle's items and was then DIRECTLY INVITED to Ft. Benning at my next leisure because he is CERTAIN that "his boss" would definately want to see the items in person. I was very nicely "advised" to contact his office so that he can arrange for my credentials, escorted tours, and also for the possibility of me to address some upcoming graduating Airborne classes if I desire to do so. Believe me, now THAT feels REALLY WIERD, to have an 0-6 making plans to me to be a GUEST of the Post Commander for the day just because of a couple of medals and some related items that until recently sat in a closet forgotten for well over 35 years.

Hope that you have GOOD LUCK with your decision, and be sure to keep us posted on your progress. Just be careful and don't let anyone "CON, HOO-DOO, or B.S." you out of what you have for any reason because you have OUR HISTORY IN YOUR POSSESSION!!

Adam

Edited by ADAM2001, 28 May 2009 - 03:32 PM.


#7 Allan H.

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 08:00 AM

OK, I am tracking with you that the guy knew three of the raisers of the second flag raising on Mt. Suribachi, and the fact that the guy was in the same unit as these men is also well and good. The transmittal letter is also a huge plus as to value, but I am personally not seeing the historical relavence of the medal that would make a museum's staff jump up and down and want to display it on its own merits. Yes, if it was Ira Hayes' or Harlan Block's medal, you would have the significance, but we are talking about a guy that most historians, including hard-core IWO historinas have probably not heard of either.
I liken this piece to a Purple Heart that might come up for sale that was earned by a soldier whose name appears in say one of Stephen Ambrose's books. yeah, it is cool to have the connection, but does it really make the piece significant on its own merit?
To clarify my point- let's pretend that you are a baseball memorabilia collector and your favorite moment in sports history was "the catch" by Willie Mays on September 29, 1954. Owning Willie's glove, or the ball that he caught would really have huge interest and value among collectors. So, how about Cleveland pitcher Vic Wertz's glove? It was the last glove to touch the ball prior to Vic Wertz's hit. Is it historical? How about Vic Wertz's bat? Would one expect to go to Cooperstown and see these pieces on display? My thought is that they wouldn't hold the same significance.
I am not trying to say that your medal doesn't hold significant value. We would all agree that it most certainly does. I am just trying to illustrate that it isn't going to find itself in the foyer of the Marine Recruit Depot at Parris Island because the recipient knew Harlan Block. If it were to be displayed there, it would be as a tribute to the man who earned two Purple Hearts on Iwo.
My sincere recommendation to you Dom is this- if the medal does not bring you as much satisfaction as another piece that you want for your collection will, I would encourage you to hold on to it until you found that something you really want. Unless your kids are going without shoes or your house is getting ready to be foreclosed on, I would recommend that you not sell the piece unless you really have to. As has been mentioned previously, you'll end up regretting giving the piece up if you simply sell it. If money were important, they wouldn't make it out of paper. There are other things that I am sure you could sell to get some cash together.
I would suggest that you put the medal and documentation in the trade section and tell us what it would take to trade for this item. There may be someone here who has that item you are looking for, that would make both of you very happy.
Good luck and thanks for sharing the story.
Allan

#8 Manchu Warrior

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 08:38 AM

OK, I am tracking with you that the guy knew three of the raisers of the second flag raising on Mt. Suribachi, and the fact that the guy was in the same unit as these men is also well and good. The transmittal letter is also a huge plus as to value, but I am personally not seeing the historical relavence of the medal that would make a museum's staff jump up and down and want to display it on its own merits. Yes, if it was Ira Hayes' or Harlan Block's medal, you would have the significance, but we are talking about a guy that most historians, including hard-core IWO historinas have probably not heard of either.
I liken this piece to a Purple Heart that might come up for sale that was earned by a soldier whose name appears in say one of Stephen Ambrose's books. yeah, it is cool to have the connection, but does it really make the piece significant on its own merit?
To clarify my point- let's pretend that you are a baseball memorabilia collector and your favorite moment in sports history was "the catch" by Willie Mays on September 29, 1954. Owning Willie's glove, or the ball that he caught would really have huge interest and value among collectors. So, how about Cleveland pitcher Vic Wertz's glove? It was the last glove to touch the ball prior to Vic Wertz's hit. Is it historical? How about Vic Wertz's bat? Would one expect to go to Cooperstown and see these pieces on display? My thought is that they wouldn't hold the same significance.
I am not trying to say that your medal doesn't hold significant value. We would all agree that it most certainly does. I am just trying to illustrate that it isn't going to find itself in the foyer of the Marine Recruit Depot at Parris Island because the recipient knew Harlan Block. If it were to be displayed there, it would be as a tribute to the man who earned two Purple Hearts on Iwo.
My sincere recommendation to you Dom is this- if the medal does not bring you as much satisfaction as another piece that you want for your collection will, I would encourage you to hold on to it until you found that something you really want. Unless your kids are going without shoes or your house is getting ready to be foreclosed on, I would recommend that you not sell the piece unless you really have to. As has been mentioned previously, you'll end up regretting giving the piece up if you simply sell it. If money were important, they wouldn't make it out of paper. There are other things that I am sure you could sell to get some cash together.
I would suggest that you put the medal and documentation in the trade section and tell us what it would take to trade for this item. There may be someone here who has that item you are looking for, that would make both of you very happy.
Good luck and thanks for sharing the story.
Allan

This is just my opinion. But I believe that you have a poor choice of items for your baseball analogy. Because if there is an exhibit in Cooperstown of Mays famous catch I believe, as they should be, any glove ball or bat connected to the event would be a very big deal. Now, if you mentioned that you knew someone that was trying to sell the glove of the bullpen catcher who happened to witness the famous catch while wearing that particular glove..... Again it is just my opinion.

#9 Allan H.

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 10:04 AM

This is just my opinion. But I believe that you have a poor choice of items for your baseball analogy. Because if there is an exhibit in Cooperstown of Mays famous catch I believe, as they should be, any glove ball or bat connected to the event would be a very big deal. Now, if you mentioned that you knew someone that was trying to sell the glove of the bullpen catcher who happened to witness the famous catch while wearing that particular glove..... Again it is just my opinion.



No, as I look at it, you are absolutley right. Perhaps I should have suggested displaying the cleats from the bat boy who picked up the bat or the cap from the player who roomed with the hitter when the team was on the road.

What I was trying to convey was that the relationship of the medal to the Iwo flag raising is not what makes the item historically significant.
Allan

#10 Bluehawk

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 10:23 AM

I get smacked around every time I mention this, but then, so what.

A man devotes 35+ years of his life working in museums every day, and cannot help but learn a thing or two about the profession and the people who are, sometimes justifiably, critical of it.

In the "For what it's worth" Department.

ALL museums have 4 purposes given equal weight:

- Acquisition

- Exhibition

- Preservation

- Interpretation

3 of those 4 purposes have to do directly with the artifacts themselves.

75-85% of everything in just about any museum collection is in storage, so as to preserve it, and up to 50-75% of a museum budget is spent on caretaking objects.

Yes, sometimes (maybe .001% of the time?) museum personnel do stupid and unethical deeds - such as accepting artifacts FOR the purpose of selling/trading them with or without notice to the donor.

Coincidentally, as became part of the story line in the newly released NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM II, the real threat to museums over the past 30 years has been the insatiable domination of the profession by educators and admittedly skilled geeks who have sold the industry on "interactive" exhibits - aka, objects have fast become incidental and burdensome.

Having said all that, in most cases it is preferable to donate objects to museums, UNLESS one has a pretty much rock solid family or other similarly reliable person to hand off precious stuff to.

#11 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 12:26 PM

If it were me I would hold on to it even though I don't collect USMC but the fact that it is that historically connected to some events would just amaze me every time I look/hold it. Also who knows maybe in a few months you watch a really interesting USMC movie/documentary and you want to collect USMC and then that piece is gone? Just some thoughts, but it's just my opinion on the case.

Haydn

#12 mmerc20

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 02:01 PM

I would see if you can determine where the Marines hometown was and see if they have a small museum or something. Perhaps a smaller museum could appreciate and potentially display the medal instead of a larger museum locking it away in a vault.

Mike

#13 wildcat123

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 02:01 PM

If it were me I would hold on to it even though I don't collect USMC but the fact that it is that historically connected to some events would just amaze me every time I look/hold it. Also who knows maybe in a few months you watch a really interesting USMC movie/documentary and you want to collect USMC and then that piece is gone? Just some thoughts, but it's just my opinion on the case.

Haydn


Or perhaps, later this year, an HBO miniseries about the USMC will hit the airwaves and anything related to WWII Marines will skyrocket in value... :rolleyes:

If you're going to sell, I would be careful about your timing this year to get top dollar. Then you can buy something extra nice that goes with your collecting interest.

Edited by wildcat123, 29 May 2009 - 02:02 PM.


#14 Dom Pastore Jr.

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 02:12 PM

OK Guys, Here's a brief bio & some service data on the recipient. If anyone has any of the titles I've listed below, look through them for mention of him, and you'll see what I mean. Please forgive for the somewhat lengthly post.



Date: 05-29-2009

Re: PFC L.B. HOLLY, No. 475046, USMCR
( 1942 - 1945 )


Name: LOWELL BERNARD HOLLY
( Universally referred to by his fellow Marines as "L.B. Holly" )

Rank: PFC ( Private 1st Class )

USMC Service # 475046

Date & Place of Birth: 12/28/1921 - Abilene, TX

Date & Place of Death: 05/16/2003 - Eastland, TX ( Age at Death: 81 )

Date & Place of Enlistment: 10/12/1942 - Dallas, TX

Units Assigned To & Served With:

Company K, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marine Parachute Regiment
( 1 MAC )

Company E, 2nd Battalion, 28h Marines ( 5th Marine Division )


Wounds Received In Action:

1st: 02/21/1945 on Iwo Jima - Shell Fragment Wound to Left Thumb
( Ret. to Duty after treatment at Division Surgical HQ )

2nd: 03/05/1945 on Iwo Jima - Chemical / Flame Thrower Burns to Right Leg ( Evacuated to Guam, USNBH # 18 & Pearl Harbor, T.H. USNBH # 10. )

>>> Note that his PHM was presented on 03/20/1945, at USN Hospital # 10, at Pearl Harbor, T.H., by Medical Officer in Command ( Initial PH presentation was for the wound he received on 02/21/1945, on D+2 )


>>> Basic Background Data: After completeing basic training, PFC Holly underwent USMC parachute training, & salied for New Caledonia with the 3rd Parachute Battalion. He first saw combat on Bougainville, and prior to his return to CONUS in early 1944, he had earned 3 campaign / battle stars for his Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal. ( for Vella Lavella, Bougainville, & Consolidation of the Northern Solomons ) After the Marine Corps parachute units were disbanded in February 1944, Holly was transferred to Company E, 2nd Battalion, 28th Marines, 5th Marine Division at Camp Pendleton. From September 1944, he sailed to Hawaii for further training. On Iwo Jima, as a member of E - 2/28's 2nd Platoon, PFC Holly participated in & was present for many of the more memorable / historic events that occurred during the battle. ( Both the 1st & 2nd set of flag raiser's were from either the 2nd or 3rd Platoons of E Co., 2nd Battalion, 28th Marines ) In addition to watching both flags go up on Suribachi, which a great many other Marines also did, he was present when Mike Strank was killed by an artillery shell. He had been having a conversation about dying with Mike just prior to his being hit. After gently whispering to Mike's now lifeless body, "Mike, you're the best damn Marine I ever knew", Holly then removed Mike's watch from his wrist & presented it to Cpl. Harlon Block, Harlon would now be the 2nd Platoon's leader. L.B. was also present when his 2nd Battalion commander, Col. Chandler Johnson was literally "blown to bits", also by an artillery strike in the vicinity of Nishi Ridge. Nishi Ridge was where Holly blasted open an armored door of a Japanese cave, only to come out of it riding a bicycle, loudly ringing it's bell. L.B. & 2 of his buddies were also the guys that got left behind, after the 28th's 2nd Battalion departed San Diego for Hawaii. They managed to keep low & work at odd jobs for a month or so, until they managed to stow away with one of the 28th's rear echelon groups enroute to Hawaii. Needless to say, they got into a bit of trouble upon their arrival at 5th Marine Division HQ in Hawaii. There's just so much more to tell, but I think that the data included here will give the reader an overall idea about L.B.'s WW2 service. Like I said before, maybe it's ajust another USMC WW2 era Purple Heart, I guess that's up to the induvidual to decide for himself. To me, I tend to feel that it's a viable link to an era of American history that will be forever remembered, & should be treated as such.
---------------------------------------


>>> Documented Mention Of PFC L.B. Holly / No. 475046 in U.S. Marine Corps, WW2 Related Publications;




1) "IWO" / by Richard Wheeler, 1980 / ISBN: 0690018789
( Pages: 178, 179, 180 )



2) "GIVE ME 50 MARINES NOT AFRAID TO DIE" / by Lt. John Keith Wells, USMCR,
1995 / ISBN: 0-9644675-0-X ( Pages: 77*, 110, 125, 126, 223, 269, 308* & Inside Back Cover / NOTE: Pages 77* & 308* are Photographs of L.B. Holly )



3) "IMMORTAL IMAGES" / by Tedd Thomey, 1996 / ISBN: 13 978-1-591-14-854-8 ( Page: 72 )



4) "FLAGS OF OUR FATHERS" / by James Bradley, 2000 / ISBN: 0-553-38029-X
( Pages: 184/+2*, 231, 244, 275 / NOTE: The 2nd photo page after page 184 is a photo of L.B. Holly )



5) "THE LIONS OF IMO JIMA" / by Major-General Fred Haynes, USMC (Ret.) & James Warren, 2008 / ISBN: 10: 0805083251 & 13: 978-0805083255
( Page: 172 )



6) "THE SPEARHEAD, THE 5TH MARINE DIVISION IN WORLD WAR II" / by Howard M. Conner, 1950 / ISBN: 0-89839-103-2 ( Pages: 204, 269 )



7) He also was interviewed for & is featured in the A & E Home Video ( DVD ) Presentation of "HEROES OF IWO JIMA", the October 2001, 94 minute documentary hosted by actor & former Marine Gene Hackman.



Note: Unfortunately, L.B. Holly passed away in Eastland, Texas on May 16, 2003, so I never got a chance to contact & interview him.
---------------------------------------

#15 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 02:32 PM

Dom

I would say you should keep this. Based on the amount of historical research you have done and your obvious passion for the history behind this Marine, it is better off with you than anyone else.

Kurt

#16 Tom Lane

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 03:55 PM

Hey Dom,

I gotta agree with Kurt on this one. You've obviously done a lot of work researching Mr. Holly. Keep it until something better comes along, that you can't live without, but can't afford without selling something off.

But I also think we need to differentiate between collector value and historical value here.

From a collector's perspective, it's probably as close as any of us lowly private collectors will come to owning something related to the Iwo flag raising (I have a KIA PH to a Navy corpsman who was in the same medical company as John Bradley). As such it holds a value to us above what another documented WIA Marine PH would be worth, both monetarily and historically.

But from a historical perspective, I do agree with Allan. Holly was one of hundreds of guys who knew the flagraisers, thousands of guys who were wounded on Iwo, and dozens of guys who witnessed the death of those raisers who were killed in action on Iwo. Any museum will accept your donation, and the medal and paperwork will be protected and preserved until the museum decides to deaccession it (sell it off).

#17 WW2 History Buff

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 05:04 PM

Or perhaps, later this year, an HBO miniseries about the USMC will hit the airwaves and anything related to WWII Marines will skyrocket in value... :rolleyes:

If you're going to sell, I would be careful about your timing this year to get top dollar. Then you can buy something extra nice that goes with your collecting interest.

Yep that was what i was getting at http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif , and after all this work i agree with the rest that you should keep it.

#18 Jim Baker

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 05:18 PM

I'm thinking of opening a small museum and would be happy to accept the medals. I also promise NEVER to trade them away. ;)

#19 camopara

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 05:37 PM

Dom,
Indeed the paramarine roster has him serving with K Co. 3rd Bn. Sounds like a great and historical PH!!

#20 dhcoleterracina

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Posted 29 May 2009 - 07:44 PM

I wish all Museum's could be handled like Bluehawk. My problem is that I had donated a beautiful Civil War era CSA photo expecting it to be displayed [they have few CSA items] and get the proud feeling every time I visited the Museum. I never saw it again and when I inquired I was given the "I'll get back to you..." I felt foolish and I will NEVER donate to a Museum again.


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In Memory of Co-Founder GREG MILLS ROBINSON, a.k.a. "Marine-KaBar"
(February 17, 1949 - March 5, 2011)