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Model of 1917 Enfield with sling question

Started by GetSome!!! , Mar 25 2009 03:53 PM

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11 replies to this topic

#1 GetSome!!!

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 03:53 PM

Hi,

is this the correct sling?..if not what rifle is it for?

thanks

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Edited by Charlie Flick, 25 March 2009 - 06:04 PM.


#2 37thguy

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 03:54 PM

That sling is fine. http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif

#3 hawkdriver

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 04:17 PM

As said, it would be correct. Also, a KERR No-buckle would work as well.

#4 M1Marksman

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 04:31 PM

Correct sling, wrong rifle designation. Model Of 1917, or M-1917, or M-17. P stands for "pattern", which is a British designation. The U.S. used "model", then a number.

BTW, I have the same sling on my M-1917. I use a Canadian khaki web sling on my P-14. Whether it's correct or not, it's the closest I have.

Also, keep in mind there are 2 lengths of Kerr slings; one for rifles & the other for the Thompson SMG.

Edited by M1Marksman, 25 March 2009 - 04:55 PM.


#5 GetSome!!!

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 05:19 PM

Thanks for all the quick responses and good info!

#6 Charlie Flick

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 06:02 PM

G:

You already have the answer to your question, but a period pic is always useful. So, check out these soldiers who are members of the 367th Infantry Regiment. They are seen in New York City in 1919. Their Model of 1917 rifles are using the Model of 1907 rifle slings.

BTW, I edited the title of your thread so that members using the search function in the future can find your thread using the correct nomenclature.

HTH.
Regards,
Charlie Flick

367th_Inf_Regt_in_NYC_1919.jpg

Edited by Charlie Flick, 25 March 2009 - 06:06 PM.


#7 El Bibliotecario

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Posted 25 March 2009 - 07:33 PM

A quibble and a query~

(And this is eine GROSSE quibble) Did US nomemclature ever use dashes? One constantly sees references to the M-1903, M-1, M-16, etc, etc, but my sense is official nomenclature did not use dashes; i.e. M1903, M1, M16. But I could be wrong (although at my age that's agony to admit) so I'd be interested to see examples from primary source material showing the use of dashes.

My query is addressed to Charlie Flick RE his photo:
Was the 367th Inf one of the black regiments who fought with the French? If so, I'm thinking they were issued French rifles to facilitate ammunition resupply? If I'm right about this, did they turn in their weapons before embarking to the US and were reissued M1917s for the parade?

An appropriate answer to this would be, 'how the devil should I know?'

#8 MikeS

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 10:38 AM

G:

You already have the answer to your question, but a period pic is always useful. So, check out these soldiers who are members of the 367th Infantry Regiment. They are seen in New York City in 1919. Their Model of 1917 rifles are using the Model of 1907 rifle slings.

BTW, I edited the title of your thread so that members using the search function in the future can find your thread using the correct nomenclature.

HTH.
Regards,
Charlie Flick

367th_Inf_Regt_in_NYC_1919.jpg


No rifles, but a connection. This is from a yard long (actually 48") photo in the collection. There are two fellows in the middle wearing what appear to be the Cross de Guerre, but I cannot see any crossed 'swords' on the medals. Any thoughts on what they may be?

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Edited by MikeS, 31 March 2009 - 10:40 AM.


#9 MikeS

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Posted 31 March 2009 - 10:41 AM

Closeup...

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Edited by MikeS, 31 March 2009 - 10:42 AM.


#10 kphfun

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Posted 02 April 2009 - 11:53 PM

No rifles, but a connection. This is from a yard long (actually 48") photo in the collection. There are two fellows in the middle wearing what appear to be the Cross de Guerre, but I cannot see any crossed 'swords' on the medals. Any thoughts on what they may be?


I don't think it is a Cross de Guerre (Can't say what the medal is.) as the date of the picture is May 1918 and the regiment did not ship overseas until June 1918. Mabey they got the date wrong but I doubt it as all members of this unit got awarded the Cross de Guerre in France. Still a very cool Pic.

#11 world war I nerd

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 12:09 AM

Are they wearing silver Rifle Sharpshooter badges?

#12 MikeS

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Posted 03 April 2009 - 10:16 AM

Are they wearing silver Rifle Sharpshooter badges?


You know, I bet you are correct. The WW1 Erar SS Badge looks exactly like that! Sounds like theat mystery may be solved! http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif


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