Jump to content


Photo

Darkening leather with Pecard's - test


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 Tom @ Snake River

Tom @ Snake River
  • Members
    • Member ID: 4,931
  • 96 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Idaho

Posted 25 January 2009 - 07:01 PM

You guys hammered on me untill I got some Pecard's Antique Leather treatment.
What is pictured (although somewhat fuzzy) is a 1943 British artillery pack that I treated.
In a way, I hated to treat it, but it is displayed in a barn and subject to moisture and the occasiional bird dropping.
At least with the Pecard's it should be well treated and be able to resist stains.
I thought that the darkening was minimal, and the Pecard's does dry down and polish off nice, not leaving an oilly or sticky surface.

Pecard_test.jpg

#2 Tom @ Snake River

Tom @ Snake River
  • Members
    • Member ID: 4,931
  • 96 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Eastern Idaho

Posted 26 January 2009 - 05:43 PM

Lets try another picture. I am having a heck of a time taking pics in artificial light.

Brit_artillery_pack.jpg

#3 C. Roelens

C. Roelens
  • Members
    • Member ID: 1,673
  • 668 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 January 2009 - 10:28 PM

looks good... I've used Pecard for over 30 years and nothing else. Usually around the 3-5 year mark you might need to apply another thin coat to keep it looking good.

#4 mrhell

mrhell
  • Members
    • Member ID: 3,414
  • 627 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Midwest

Posted 27 January 2009 - 04:58 AM

+1 http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif

Pecards produces excellent results when applied properly...... and you certainly did this. I see many items that are soaked with the stuff and I guess some folks think more is better. All you'll get is an oily, mushy leather that eventually turns into a pasty-white crackling mess! http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/crying.gif

While this topic can be quite a can of worms with " the experts", I too have had nothing but great results with Pecards.

#5 MattOravik

MattOravik
  • Members
    • Member ID: 137
  • 1,927 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Planet earth, USA

Posted 17 March 2009 - 12:26 PM

I hate to ask this question but it could save me gas money...where can you buy pecards? I was going to buy it from their website but why pay shipping if I can just pick it up while I'm out and about.

-Matt.

#6 Sgt Brown

Sgt Brown

    IN MEMORIAM

  • IN MEMORIAM
    • Member ID: 81
  • 1,092 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NE Ohio

Posted 17 March 2009 - 03:12 PM

I hate to ask this question but it could save me gas money...where can you buy pecards? I was going to buy it from their website but why pay shipping if I can just pick it up while I'm out and about.

-Matt.


Call around to your area hardware stores (especially if you know of any of the old-fashioned kind) and tack shops.

Tom http://www.usmilitar...tyle_emoticons/default/thumbsup.gif

#7 jgawne

jgawne
  • Inactive
    • Member ID: 1,657
  • 3,048 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Outside Boston USA

Posted 17 March 2009 - 04:27 PM

I've been hearing in the conservation world that after a while the pecars sytarts to develop funny little white spots- which I was told are some salts leeching out. Looks like small mold growths.

I've seen this but do not know if it a issue as it seems to wipe off fairly well.

#8 Blake_E

Blake_E
  • Members
    • Member ID: 3,398
  • 1,898 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 March 2009 - 05:00 AM

Personally, i wont touch the stuff. I have a 1943 G&K M1916 holster, that was in perfect near unissued condition, that the previous owner completely destroyed with pecards. That chalky, streaky, mouldy look all over the corners and edges, everywhere. To be fair, i would presume they over pecarded it, but still, i'll never touch the stuff. I probably sound like a broken record, repeatedly saying this, but Connollys Hide Food/Care is the stuff you want, a million times better

Edited by Blake_E, 18 March 2009 - 05:02 AM.


#9 jagjetta

jagjetta

    Sponsor

  • SPONSOR
    • Member ID: 949
  • 1,363 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Minnesota USA

Posted 18 March 2009 - 06:02 AM

Personally, i wont touch the stuff. I have a 1943 G&K M1916 holster, that was in perfect near unissued condition, that the previous owner completely destroyed with pecards. That chalky, streaky, mouldy look all over the corners and edges, everywhere. To be fair, i would presume they over pecarded it, but still, i'll never touch the stuff. I probably sound like a broken record, repeatedly saying this, but Connollys Hide Food/Care is the stuff you want, a million times better



You know, cooking cow flesh is another way to "preserve" stuff. And yet, even a properly cooked steak eventually rots away.

You can't "preserve" leather with magic potions. You can only speed up the decay. And that is what your magic potion Pecard does. People love to say, "Works good for me!" but if you are REALLY, GENUINELY concerned about preservation, the best thing you can do is nothing. Doing nothing does not speed up the natural passage of time. Spreading goo on your leather, DOES...the science has shown it, over and over again. Nevertheless, people who drink the magic water are the last to say, "Hey, there is something funny about the water!"

John A-G

#10 Chris_B

Chris_B
  • Members
    • Member ID: 3,065
  • 1,256 posts
  • Location:Canton MA. USA

Posted 25 May 2009 - 01:32 PM

I am not a scientist. But I do know that leather dries out.

I have learned to be very leery of providing an opinion around here on some subjects, as folks get borderline vehemently angry when somebody disagrees with them, almost as if the disagreement is a personal statement. I don't understand that but I see it on several subjects so I am not going to voice an opinion on how to approach leather care.

Great lookign packs, Tom.

I hope everyone has had a great memorial day.

Edited by Chris_B, 25 May 2009 - 01:33 PM.


#11 88thcollector

88thcollector
  • Members
    • Member ID: 827
  • 1,402 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 26 May 2009 - 04:27 PM

Hi,

There has been at least one other good thread on this subject. The best treatment for about anything is nothing. No professional museum conservator recommends using any treatments or lubricants on leather. They used to but not now. here is a good article:

http://cool-palimpse...ksen.html#ref20

#12 m.c.lilley

m.c.lilley
  • New Members
    • Member ID: 7,193
  • 17 posts

Posted 11 July 2009 - 02:32 PM

I have been advised to stay away from Pecards because it is my understanding that it is petroleum-based. Ultimately, it will eat at the leather. This is not worth any short term cosmetic advantage. m.c.lilley

#13 gunbarrel

gunbarrel
  • Members
    • Member ID: 70
  • 6,314 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 12 July 2009 - 09:45 AM

I have been advised to stay away from Pecards because it is my understanding that it is petroleum-based. Ultimately, it will eat at the leather. This is not worth any short term cosmetic advantage. m.c.lilley


Interesting. If the leather is in good shape, I leave it alone. However, I have used Pecard's Antique Leather Dressing on dried-up leather for years with great results. My understanding is that neatsfoot oil and mink oil are petroleum derivatives, but Pecard's is not. I once heard someone say that the biggest threat to your valuable old leather is bad information.

#14 Gunney Chris

Gunney Chris
  • Members
    • Member ID: 5,952
  • 70 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Lowestoft, Suffolk, England

Posted 29 August 2009 - 06:40 AM

What would you suggest for colouring leather items, I have a light tan 1911 holster I want to get black..

#15 O.G-Palmer

O.G-Palmer
  • Members
    • Member ID: 1,819
  • 178 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:England, Norfolk

Posted 29 September 2009 - 04:03 PM

Chris mate ill pm you.

#16 1st.marine.captain.17

1st.marine.captain.17
  • New Members
    • Member ID: 49,945
  • 26 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 07 November 2012 - 06:15 PM

User BEWARE! To any kind of dressing or oils, ALWAYS clean the leather with water and saddle soap prior treatments and rub it well. The more you rub, the better!

Then again, remove the excess! Buff it all up! Some elbow grease serve better than damaged leather. It happens with mink oil and other treatment as well that users tended to leave the treatment on the surface and let it sit. This is sick and wrong! Oily surface attracts dirts and grimes, not the dressing itself.

For oils, let them dry. Use emulsification theory - that is, water to clean and semi-lubricate, then let it thoroughly dry and apply oil. Once again, whenever oils are dried to a dull or extra dull sheen, BUFF them all OFF of the surface.

I had a couple of friends who did as well suffer rotten leather from surface residues due to un-buffed leather surface. But NOT for me.

#17 1st.marine.captain.17

1st.marine.captain.17
  • New Members
    • Member ID: 49,945
  • 26 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 07 November 2012 - 06:20 PM

What would you suggest for colouring leather items, I have a light tan 1911 holster I want to get black..


Use oil to darken it. Don't use leather dye. Oil will do well. Clean the holster with saddle soap, rinse and totally dry the leather. Then when it has totally dried out, wipe it with wet, moist cloth. Then apply any kind of leather oil compound as in Obenauf's oil, Pecard's oil or Huberd's oil. No pure Neatsfoot, no Mink oil or Neatsfoot compound. If you can spend time, make your own oil. I used Neatsfoot oil, Linseed oil, Olive oil and Cedar wood oil and make a helluva leather oil out of them.

Be aware that oils as well needed to be buff off of the leather surface. After oil treatment, a wax treatment is advise for further coloring and protecting purpose.

Edited by 1st.marine.captain.17, 07 November 2012 - 06:22 PM.



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users