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How to thread 1910 haversack straps?


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#1 ww2_1943

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 10:32 AM

Hello all,
How do you "thread" the straps on ww1 style buckles on the M-1910 haversack? The straps on mine are done three different ways. Two of those ways have the metal taps pointing up, as opposed to down as on my m-1928 haversack with friction buckles. An explanation with photos would be greatly appreciated.
Thank You

#2 craig_pickrall

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 10:57 AM

I think it is possible to find a pic to support any method you would prefer to use. I think you will see more early pics with the metal tips up and later you will see more pics with them down but still you can find them any way you like.

These pics are of the drawing for the M1910 and show the straps threaded with the tips up for what that is worth. There is a side view of the lacing arrangement shown at the bottom of the drawing. You may need to enlarge it to view it properly.

M1910_PACK_1A_TITLE_BLOCK.jpg
m1910_pack__1a.jpg

#3 craig_pickrall

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 11:00 AM

When I tried to view that pic blown up it was fuzzy. I will try to edit a pic of it in closer detail and post it in a few minutes.

#4 craig_pickrall

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 11:04 AM

I hope this is good enough detail. If not let me know and I will take more pics.

m1910_pack__1b.jpg

#5 ww2_1943

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 11:24 AM

This is great info. Just to confirm, the tip is facing out, as opposed to in (against the soldiers body, if there was a soldier wearing the haversack) in the last pic?
Thank You

Edited by ww2_1943, 11 March 2007 - 11:27 AM.


#6 craig_pickrall

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 01:37 PM

Yes the tip is on the outside. If the soldier is wearing the gear you can see the tips showing and they are pointing up.

As I said before, you can find many, many pics to prove either way is correct.

#7 VolunteerArmoury

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Posted 10 April 2007 - 02:28 PM

This is likely a common knowledge deal but I am familiar with the leather traditionally utilized on the pack but I understand there was also a canvas one as well. Was it constructed the same as the leather? When did it come into use? Was it for specific climates or anything other details? Thank you.

#8 New Romantic

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Posted 10 April 2007 - 03:38 PM

I'm not quite sure what your refering too, but the 1st pattern haversack used two leather laces to secure the meatcan pouch to the haversack.

Check out this link to an older topic

http://www.usmilitar...?showtopic=3026

#9 craig_pickrall

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Posted 10 April 2007 - 07:40 PM

Is this about the leather strap that attaches the pack tail extender to the main pack? If so then the only ones I have seen made of webbing rather than leather are on the Brit made M28's during WW2.


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