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Red carlisle bandage tin.


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#1 ww2_1943

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Posted 09 March 2007 - 06:03 PM

When did the red Carlisle bandage tin appear? I know it was to show the tin contained sulfur powder. What would be seen early in the war red or green tins?
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#2 craig_pickrall

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Posted 09 March 2007 - 09:55 PM

http://www.usmilitar...?showtopic=1496

Follow the link to see some examples. There is OD cases both with and without sulfur. A box with sulfur is dated 1943 but the box without is undated. The only orange cases shown are undated and do have sulfur.

Where did the info come from that says the orange color is related to the sulfur?

#3 Greg Robinson

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 01:48 AM

http://www.usmilitar...?showtopic=1496

Follow the link to see some examples. There is OD cases both with and without sulfur. A box with sulfur is dated 1943 but the box without is undated. The only orange cases shown are undated and do have sulfur.

Where did the info come from that says the orange color is related to the sulfur?


A few years ago I bought a box of the orange painted carlisle packets that do NOT have sulfa markings on the back. But prior to that I picked up an early M1923 pouch with a RED painted packet that is so marked. I understand that sometimes unscrupulous dealers/collectors repainted green packets but in my case the red paint is worn and chipped and there's no sign of green underneath.

I was always told the green carlisle packet replaced the orange ones in or around 1943. And one of the changes that occurred at that time was they starting adding sulfa powder into the packet instead of being carried separately.

#4 artu44

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 02:08 AM

In the excellent french site leaded by Laurent Pradier there is a chapter dedicated to small first aid dressings in metalkic box.
Take a look at:
http://perso.orange......tation fr.htm

If Craig think it could be translated for the benefit of english only speakers, I can do it.

Laurant says that when they introduced the sulfanamide, they added the relevant marking on the back of the OD metal box. However They wanted recover the huge amount of previous made empty, unmarked back, boxes and , in order to indicate there it was the sulfanamide inside, they painted them red/orange. For a while they produced also boxes back marked in red/orange cause people automatically used to do the equation red=sulfanamide.

#5 Michiel M.

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 11:34 AM

The Red First Aid boxes were replaced by green ones in June 1943...

#6 QED4

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Posted 10 March 2007 - 07:59 PM

According to the book "Individual Gear and Personal Items of the GI in Europe" by James B. Klokner this type of container was adopted in 1939 and was green and did not have Sulfanilamide. In 1940 the Sulfanilamide was added and the container was embossed and still green. They used the old unembossed containers on hand to make ones with sulfanilamide but painted them red to indicate that it was in there. It dose not give a date that this was started but I would guess there was no exact start date as it was just sort of a stop gap measure to use up old stock. The ones that were already green were over painted red. I can't imagine anybody going to the trouble of painting them just to make a couple of extra dollars, red ones are not a big buck items.

#7 artu44

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 02:53 AM

This is an embossed one originally painted red/orange.

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#8 ww2_1943

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Posted 11 March 2007 - 10:30 AM

Thanks for all the replies. It seem that a green tin without sulfur powder would be the better assumption for early war, as opposed to the red tin.

#9 Pegasus6

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Posted 21 December 2017 - 04:00 PM

Old post. But there's no reason if you are say looking for an early war... 1941/42 Go with a 1918 or 1919 dated Double Dot pouch, and a WWI bandage case.... Same company made them. I'm sure they were around. And especially for troops in say the Philippines or marines...

 

2 cents to an old post maybe help someone else.

 

-Peg 6

Thanks for all the replies. It seem that a green tin without sulfur powder would be the better assumption for early war, as opposed to the red tin.

 




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