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CPO Karnes, Eugene, A


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#26 sigsaye

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Posted 27 September 2019 - 09:05 AM

Seriously, not that bad. Id leave it alone

#27 ludwigh1980

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Posted 27 September 2019 - 09:56 AM

Not bad at all. If too much damaged for you, sell it to someone who will charish it. Don't remove the insignia. Looks like a great group.

#28 cagedfalcon

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Posted 27 September 2019 - 02:00 PM

I see I forgot to post the khaki coat. I would never dismantle history just due to imperfections. The khaki coat is very brittle as you can see. Just putting it on a hanger caused the split on the sleeve. I will leave as found & leave on wooden hanger. 7566f7b3bc22338e5b7879afd1959e45.jpg7cb2797169069423fa877a34a3f33091.jpg9577ee7e4978389871431adb8bf2b4f1.jpg38ae1e5e7003ab924132b7d759a5b5e0.jpg5141e08c70f0d3f1adc3cac9aa91901f.jpg Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

Edited by cagedfalcon, 27 September 2019 - 02:01 PM.


#29 MastersMate

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 08:15 AM

In the FWIW department..

 

Working with nylon ropes, occasionally they would get very stiff and damned near impossible to work with or splice.  A shipyard rigger mentioned that soaking the line in e fairly heavy mixture of fabric softener and freash water would soften it up and make it pliable enough to re splice and work with.  It worked.

 

Not sure you'd want to make that move with a WW2 collectable though.. Maybe a test soak on a sleeve ???



#30 sigsaye

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 11:12 AM

In the FWIW department..
 
Working with nylon ropes, occasionally they would get very stiff and damned near impossible to work with or splice.  A shipyard rigger mentioned that soaking the line in e fairly heavy mixture of fabric softener and freash water would soften it up and make it pliable enough to re splice and work with.  It worked.
 
Not sure you'd want to make that move with a WW2 collectable though.. Maybe a test soak on a sleeve ???

. At this point, nothing really to lose.

#31 Burning Hazard

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 03:37 PM

What is that big black thing? looks like a medical operating table with a glass top?

 

Pat

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#32 sigsaye

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 03:38 PM

What is that big black thing? looks like a medical operating table with a glass top?
 
Pat

. Early X-Ray machine. He was an X-Ray tech.

#33 cagedfalcon

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 03:58 PM

. Early X-Ray machine. He was an X-Ray tech.

Would that fall under
Pharmacist Mate?

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Edited by cagedfalcon, 28 September 2019 - 04:07 PM.


#34 sigsaye

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Posted 28 September 2019 - 07:20 PM

Would that fall under Pharmacist Mate?Sent from my SM-N960U using Tapatalk

. Yes. Thats who does those things. In the paper work that has been posted with this collection, he mentions going to the X-Ray Tech school.

#35 cagedfalcon

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Posted 30 September 2019 - 01:47 PM

. At this point, nothing really to lose.

Soaked for about an hour in fabric softener. Still stained but at least it's not crunchy & it smells nice.

I'm going to let dry then soak in borax & lightly agitate it by hand.

"At this point I've nothing to lose" & everything to gain in experience for others.

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#36 cagedfalcon

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 04:21 AM

Wasn't even dry & it just fell apart. Saved buttons & rank.

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#37 sigsaye

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 04:25 AM

Thats too bad. But, it was a shot.

#38 jguy1986

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Posted 01 October 2019 - 04:31 AM

Fabrics strength like that can never be restored, only preserved. Like leather, once its gone its gone. Honestly, it should never have been put back onto a hanger at all, just laid flat and stored folded.

#39 cagedfalcon

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 04:44 PM

To answer your questions about uniform care, yes, you can have the uniforms dry cleaned. Ask the person taking the uniforms to "hand tumble" the uniforms and to stitch muslin over the bullion rates. A smaller operation will most likely do this.
 
As for the ribbons on the uniform at the wedding, the sailor is wearing the American Defense with star and the Asiatic Pacific with one campaign star. The lasst ribbon could be the Navy Good Conduct medal, or it could be the Philippine Liberation ribbon. I would hazard a guess that it is a GC. The order of precedence for the GC ribbon changed in WWII.
 
Allan

Allan
Since he was at Pearl during the attack would he be due a Pearl Survivor ribbon bar?
Paul

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#40 P-40Warhawk

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 06:09 PM

Allan
Since he was at Pearl during the attack would he be due a Pearl Survivor ribbon bar?
Paul

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Great group! There was no official Pearl Harbor survivor ribbon approved by the USN. Usually the most you will see is an American Defense ribbon with star for 'fleet' or 'base', but those were not exclusive to those at Pearl (guys stationed in the Panama Canal Zone, Atlantic, etc could be eligible under the right conditions).



#41 cagedfalcon

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 06:10 PM

 
Great group! There was no official Pearl Harbor survivor ribbon approved by the USN. Usually the most you will see is an American Defense ribbon with star for 'fleet' or 'base', but those were not exclusive to those at Pearl (guys stationed in the Panama Canal Zone, Atlantic, etc could be eligible under the right conditions).

Thank you
Saw a reference to it on another forum.

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#42 sigsaye

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 06:23 PM

 
Great group! There was no official Pearl Harbor survivor ribbon approved by the USN. Usually the most you will see is an American Defense ribbon with star for 'fleet' or 'base', but those were not exclusive to those at Pearl (guys stationed in the Panama Canal Zone, Atlantic, etc could be eligible under the right conditions).

. My uncle was at Pearl. He had American Defence and Pacific Campaign ( with a number of stars). And, of course the other usual ribbons for WW2, Korea. He enlisted in 1939, retired in 1960.

#43 P-40Warhawk

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Posted 02 November 2019 - 06:37 PM

. My uncle was at Pearl. He had American Defence and Pacific Campaign ( with a number of stars). And, of course the other usual ribbons for WW2, Korea. He enlisted in 1939, retired in 1960.

 

Right, I left out the Pacific ribbon, but that is about the only other one a survivor would have from that event. I mentioned the American Defense because I sometimes hear people who think it was a Pearl Harbor only ribbon, but it wasn't of course.



#44 sigsaye

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Posted 04 November 2019 - 04:50 AM

My uncle went in in 1937. Stayed until 1960. Was at Pearl Harbor, aboard USS Sunnadin. AT-28 ( Ocean Going Tug). Then trans freed to USS Elkhorn, AKA, and finished the war aboard USS Pennsylvania. Trans feted to USS St. Paul in Shanghai (with my dad). Was on shore duty for the Korean War and retired from USS Pickens (DD).

He had the American Campaign, Asia/Pacific Campaign. WW2 Victory, Asia Occupation, China Service and National Defence.

#45 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 04 November 2019 - 08:12 AM

Sin the jumper & khaki are so moth eaten, would it be acceptable to remove ratings & embroidered name?2a2ed21caaec3ed2f0d9f3a5737c76c4.jpg193bf3d25ca9990ba7dbc72e78b6e064.jpgf1e87c00d48447a4c9d9691bea084536.jpge4b72c397e799f5e9cd4547d49f6bf87.jpg

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Honolulu tailor made jumpers are scarce. I would leave it alone. My Father In Law was a Pearl Harbor survivor and much to my dismay he chucked his uniforms.

 

 

I collect Pearl Harbor groups, so anything like this that may have been worn or used during the time of the attack regardless of condition is worth keeping.

 

Kurt




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