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Best, least intrusive polish/cleaner for pine


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#1 avigo

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 05:03 AM

I have a pine military trunk that has some scratches/scars and generally could just use a good polish.

 

What is the best product to use? It seems like it might have a veneer on it. Not sure. But it's not untreated pine.

 

What do museums or antique collectors use? Normal I would just use Murphy's oil soap but I'm not sure if that's ideal in this situation.

Thanks!



#2 Allan H.

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 07:17 AM

It's funny that you mention Murphy's Oil soap and concerns with using it as I immediately thought "he should use Murph's Oil Soap!"
 
I've seen it used on VERY expensive and old furniture to great effect. I would recommend that you look at the reviews of the product. The one person who complained about the streaks most likely didn't have it mixed properly, or they didn't get the excess wiped off evenly. I know a lot of antique dealers who swear by it. https://www.influens...urphys-oil-soap

 

Allan



#3 avigo

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Posted 19 June 2019 - 07:22 AM

It's funny that you mention Murphy's Oil soap and concerns with using it as I immediately thought "he should use Murph's Oil Soap!"
 
I've seen it used on VERY expensive and old furniture to great effect. I would recommend that you look at the reviews of the product. The one person who complained about the streaks most likely didn't have it mixed properly, or they didn't get the excess wiped off evenly. I know a lot of antique dealers who swear by it. https://www.influens...urphys-oil-soap

 

Allan

 

Thanks!
What I have mostly heard is that no kind of oil based product should be used on any antique furniture as it can get into cracks, rot, turn the wood black, etc. and I've heard most museums recommend only using a wax on wood.

 

But good to hear you know of antique dealers who is this without any issues.

 

Was just curious if anyone had any first hand experience



#4 Allan H.

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 04:43 AM

When I was a teen almost forty years ago, I worked for a couple of antique dealers where I did everything from move furniture to restoration work. I worked with a couple of guys that I thought were ancient who were just amazing when it came to doing things like replacing missing gingerbread and splicing new wood into 100 plus year old planks on damaged pieces. We used Murphy's Oil a lot.

 

If you are worried about Murphy's, you can get some boiled linseed oil and use that. It is not petroleum based and it will refresh dry wood. Be sure that you are using BOILED linseed oil as regular linseed oil will be sticky to the touch and once it is on, it is hard to get off completely. Boiled linseed oil is about the most unobtrusive liquid that you can use on wood that won't have negative side effects.

 

Allan



#5 avigo

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 05:23 AM

When I was a teen almost forty years ago, I worked for a couple of antique dealers where I did everything from move furniture to restoration work. I worked with a couple of guys that I thought were ancient who were just amazing when it came to doing things like replacing missing gingerbread and splicing new wood into 100 plus year old planks on damaged pieces. We used Murphy's Oil a lot.

 

If you are worried about Murphy's, you can get some boiled linseed oil and use that. It is not petroleum based and it will refresh dry wood. Be sure that you are using BOILED linseed oil as regular linseed oil will be sticky to the touch and once it is on, it is hard to get off completely. Boiled linseed oil is about the most unobtrusive liquid that you can use on wood that won't have negative side effects.

 

Allan

 

Thank you Allan!
I am probably overthinking things and should just use Murphy's Oil soap, I just really like this particular piece so wanted to see if I could take some extra care.

Might look into the boiled linseed oil. Thanks again



#6 Bluehawk

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 05:56 AM

... I've heard most museums recommend only using a wax on wood.

 

We used microcrystalline wax (e.g. Ren Wax, an amazing preservative) 

 

https://restorationp...enaissance-wax/



#7 avigo

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 06:10 AM

We used microcrystalline wax (e.g. Ren Wax, an amazing preservative) 

 

https://restorationp...enaissance-wax/

 

Thanks!

So would you use that on an entire wood piece like this?



#8 Bluehawk

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Posted 20 June 2019 - 07:43 AM

 

Thanks!

So would you use that on an entire wood piece like this?

Certainly, I did (as a museum curator), and would... without hesitation.

Microcrystalline wax has the advantage of preserving, with minimal and reversible discoloration, most "solid" non-porous artifacts... long term. It is, of course, not proper for highly porous paper or textile (etc) artifacts.

One is unable to reverse the visible manifestations of aging, obviously. However, preserving (vs "restoring") artifacts - means stabilizing them so as to slow down or even prevent further deterioration.




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