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EBAY COLLECTION OF SALES TAX


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#26 KASTAUFFER

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 06:41 AM

You can always move to Oregon! Oregon has no sales tax so you won’t be charged there.

Kurt

#27 costa

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 07:46 AM

I titled it EBAY TAX RIP OFF to attract attention. ebay and pay pal both over time have been jacking up the cut of the cake and there is no end. get my drift. I use ebay a lot and buy a lot, not now.

As others have stated, this isn't an "EBAY RIP OFF TAX" as the thread title implies. It is a business policy put in place to comply with the effects of a recent Supreme Court decision regarding taxation for online purchases. Ebay has no choice but to comply with the new state laws. I really get tired of all the grousing about Ebay and Paypal. Both are businesses not collector benevolent organizations. As such, they have a profit motive and must comply with the law (like any other legitimate business). Can using their services be a bit pricey? sure, but they are both fantastic tools IMO and my collection is better than it would be without them. Remember the good old days of paper catalogues and sending postal money orders to strangers in the mail? No thanks. As another poster stated...factor the fees and taxes in to your buying and selling and adjust your bids and expectations accordingly...or simply don't use them.

 



#28 MWalsh

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 08:55 AM

It is still far, far easier to sell on eBay (I would argue) then have to sort, pack, drive to a show, pay for meals, get a hotel, maybe sell something, maybe not, maybe have something stolen off your table, have careless people damage your items, endure the tire kickers, and then commit the hours to it all. Oh and did I say "pay the state their taxes"? I have to have a tax number to set up at a show in my state, and in a neighboring state am required to send in payment for taxes within a couple weeks if I set up and sell there. Yep, it stinks. Just one more cost added on. 

 

But it is still an international marketplace, and things sell on eBay, sometimes really, amazingly well too. And the buying opportunities are endless, me and Doyler's goat never even need to leave the house or the basement to buy as much as we want.    

 

To each his own.   



#29 doyler

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 09:35 AM

It is still far, far easier to sell on eBay (I would argue) then have to sort, pack, drive to a show, pay for meals, get a hotel, maybe sell something, maybe not, maybe have something stolen off your table, have careless people damage your items, endure the tire kickers, and then commit the hours to it all. Oh and did I say "pay the state their taxes"? I have to have a tax number to set up at a show in my state, and in a neighboring state am required to send in payment for taxes within a couple weeks if I set up and sell there. Yep, it stinks. Just one more cost added on. 

 

But it is still an international marketplace, and things sell on eBay, sometimes really, amazingly well too. And the buying opportunities are endless, me and Doyler's goat never even need to leave the house or the basement to buy as much as we want.    

 

To each his own.   

 

 

True....I think there in the Northland I can do one show a year(or use to) as a vendor with out tax obligations.Several years ago the military show here would include a tax form to remit with your vendor packet and if it wasn't filled out(or a tax number supplied) and sent in the next year the promotor would have a list and not rent a table to vendors who didn't have the issue resolved.Twice I had mailed in the form right after the show leaving town and I still had to contact the state as it had "fell through the cracks".

 

At the Tulsa gun show there is a table there that vendors can pay the tax and submit the form and payment in person before leaving the show.Really its a catch-22 scenario: the sales are all in cash typically.The ones collecting the tax have no idea what you really sold or didn't sell.A number placed in the sales box and the tax applied to said number,pay and leave.I guess they state figures something is better than nothing as some just throw in $10-$20 and call it good.Just think if there are 4600 tables and only one(hypothetically)vendor per table(many have several tables).At Just $20 a table in tax that's a bit of cash for the state for a weekend event.To rent a table at Tulsa its currently the price is $175 for Gun/knife tables.Non related tables are $210.THey are 8 foot tables and when those are gone they sell 6 foot for the same price.I went to the show once several years ago with a guy who set up.The table then was $130 for him.Before he left they announced the dealers to "reserve for next year to get your same table and the next years price was already set at $140.THey bumped it $10/per table and that's a huge influx of cash as well for the promotor at shows end as most all reserve the tables for the next show.THey kept telling people they wont raise the price then do so.I know several now who no longer g to get tables due to the expense of the driving,motels,tables,etc.Others still go as its a place they buy and sell like no other.

 

Recall a show in Wisconsin once and they sent a friend a book after the show and a form for him to pay the tax he owed for doing the show.The tax book detailing the do's-dont's-exemptions and legalities was staggering.He showed it to his tax man and he was even confused.THere were items that were taxable,items that were not like used clothing or something to the wording.Since he sold surplus military clothes I guess it would fall under the used clothing(?).He returned the form and didn't hear back.Funny how they have the time and money to chase down a few tax dollars after he paid a lot of tax in the area on fuel,motel tax,food etc.

 

I understand the SOS in Kentucky also has tax obligations and its more than common for many larger shows no matter were you live or sell at.Im sure the local vendors are typically familiar with the tax requirements but the out of state people are often unaware or fail to familiarize themselves to the tax fees etc.

 

 

Mike...watch that damn goat.It eats leather and patches like candy. :blush:  ;)



#30 jasonm

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 10:22 AM

Ebay disclosed this prior to the bill being passed and when it was going to go  into effect. They communicated very well throughout the entire process of this being passed. No surprises on my end. Still a worldwide place to shop and huge exposure if you are trying to sell. State tax is a state issue not a fault of doing business with Ebay. Just my $.02.



#31 gwb123

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 11:58 AM

Only gonna get worse. Hope the Red States are lower on the grab... already left a blue state grabber.


It's not a matter of "red vs. blue", as you can see by the list posted above.

It is a matter of how your state's tax revenues are structured.

States tend to rely on individual and corporate income tax, or sales and use tax, or a combination of the two.

Those states that are more reliant on sales tax (often to keep income tax low) will be more likely to pursue on-line purchase taxes. All the more so if the on-line seller has a physical location in the state, even if the goods on their website are coming from out of state.

#32 gwb123

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 12:03 PM

With the consensus being that eBay did not have a choice in this matter, I've changed the title of this thread fro EBAY RIP OFF TAX to EBAY COLLECTION OF SALES TAX.

#33 USARV72

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 03:13 PM

Death and taxes are 2 things one can not avoid, only getting worse. You might not know/ realize it but they tax the rain that falls on your property, “ Rain Water Run Off Tax”. When “ fleabay” started things were great, they got greedy and raised their fees. I sold for years until paypal and all the bs rules regarding what can and can not be sold. Seemed the non paying bidders increased, more problems with usps until it got to the point of screw it, not worth it. Dont miss the headaches. Ron is correct about SOS, Ky. sends you a sales tax form and one must fill it out and reemit payment. Cash sales, yea, they will get a correct ammount, lol. Never forget the Winston Salem NC show about 25 years ago, a bunch of us traveled from Va. to do show,(good show) tarbridge (Robert was there), we all had NC sales tax numbers but one guy that was retired Army. First thing Sat. morning “ the tax man cometh”’ table to table checking for tax numbers. We told the guy without a number to “ go to the head” but he was stubborn, tax man caught him. He had to prepay an estimated amount AND buy the tax number, we all laughed. “Hard head makes for a soft a- -“

#34 Thor996

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 06:18 PM

It's not a matter of "red vs. blue", as you can see by the list posted above.

It is a matter of how your state's tax revenues are structured.

States tend to rely on individual and corporate income tax, or sales and use tax, or a combination of the two.

Those states that are more reliant on sales tax (often to keep income tax low) will be more likely to pursue on-line purchase taxes. All the more so if the on-line seller has a physical location in the state, even if the goods on their website are coming from out of state.

 

I didn't say it was 'red vs blue': I said "Only gonna get worse. Hope the Red States are lower on the grab... already left a blue state grabber' In my mind,  that's not red vs blue nor did I intend that to be a politically motivated comment. So my bad for the faux pas.

 

I will say though, am happy to live in a state where there is not income tax after living in a state that highly taxed  income and had very high sales taxes as well as car excise tax, and outrageous property tax and still can't sate it's voracious appetite for more tax and  that just happened to be in New England.  I know how states tax and why they resort to taxation. however, CT is not one of those states that is sales tax reliant or income tax low. /but they are quite desperate for more money...

 

I also am very aware of the amount of money that is involved with the reasons why these states are now looking to collect this tax as it is a huge cash cow for them.


Edited by Thor996, 04 May 2019 - 06:28 PM.


#35 costa

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 07:51 PM

it funds their wrong doings. THING IS THIS, ITEMS THAT SELL FOR A LOW END WINNING BID TAX OF COURSE WOULD BE LOW. LETS SAY A HIGH END ITEM COMES UP LIKE AN M-2 PARA AND THE PRICE HITS 8-10,000 DOLLARS. I THINK MANY WOULD PROCEED WITH CAUTION AND NOT GO APE KNOWING THAT ADDED TAX IS GOING TO JACK UP THE TOTAL by a good sum. I do believe it is understandable where im going. it just may slow up their sales on big ticket items. I can do without ebay if necessary for there are many more avenues to travel to.

 

I didn't say it was 'red vs blue': I said "Only gonna get worse. Hope the Red States are lower on the grab... already left a blue state grabber' In my mind,  that's not red vs blue nor did I intend that to be a politically motivated comment. So my bad for the faux pas.

 

I will say though, am happy to live in a state where there is not income tax after living in a state that highly taxed  income and had very high sales taxes as well as car excise tax, and outrageous property tax and still can't sate it's voracious appetite for more tax and  that just happened to be in New England.  I know how states tax and why they resort to taxation. however, CT is not one of those states that is sales tax reliant or income tax low. /but they are quite desperate for more money...

 

I also am very aware of the amount of money that is involved with the reasons why these states are now looking to collect this tax as it is a huge cash cow for them.

 



#36 Forum Manager

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Posted 04 May 2019 - 08:56 PM

If you don't like their rules and regulations, don't use them or shop them. It is a very simple solution.



#37 costa

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Posted 05 May 2019 - 06:54 AM

precisely-----------



#38 dunit35

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Posted 02 July 2019 - 09:02 AM

Got hit with a sales tax fee on EBay today. I live in Oklahoma. It must have went into effect July 1st. Amazon has been charging us sales tax for a couple years now.

Its not a big deal but it does mean I wont bid as much on items. Which probably hurts me as other states dont have to worry about sales tax.

#39 Waltz41

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Posted 02 July 2019 - 12:18 PM

Yep, saw it yesterday at the top of the page.  July 1 was the date for a lot of states.  Oh well, yeah, I'll just keep it in mind now for bidding, but overall probably won't change my world too much!



#40 42ndbombers

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Posted 02 August 2019 - 03:55 AM

My state has no sales tax. However I bought a patch on Ebay for my son in Washington. I used his mailing address instead of mine as the ship to address and had to pay the Washington sales tax. I was surprised but not surprised. 



#41 aerialbridge

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 03:41 PM

One of the best things about ebay was not having to pay sales tax, which in tax-heavy California is close to 10%. 

 

Well, the party is over for California resident ebayers, who will now join 20 other states and DC in getting shafted for sales tax on purchases bought anywhere in the world.  Seems illegal since in the physical world, sales tax is based on where you buy something, not where you live..  

 

"Until today (July 1, 2019), ebay only collected sales tax in a handful of states and territories, including Minnesota, Washington, Iowa, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Nebraska, New Jersey, Idaho, and New York.

Now it's adding 13 more, including Alabama, Arkansas, Indiana, Kentucky, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Dakota, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming. That brings the tally to 21 states, plus the District of Columbia.

On October 1, eBay will add five more states, including California, North Dakota, South Carolina, Texas, and Utah.

Crap.

 



#42 aerialbridge

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Posted 14 September 2019 - 04:28 PM

Of course, it's not ebay's fault anymore that it was Amazon's fault or any other e- commerce entity that has had to collect sales tax.  They know it will affect their revenues negatively and they didn't want it anymore than ebayers did.   Thank the Robert's US Supreme Court for this one and the various states that have pushed for it.  And thank the US Congress for doing nothing about this latest tax grab.


Edited by aerialbridge, 14 September 2019 - 04:30 PM.


#43 FFZFlyer

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 10:44 AM

I don’t usually respond to these types of discussions, and this one is old, but it is still relevant.  Despite comments such as, “Charge a sales tax,” “losing revenue,’ “greedy state governments,” “red states vs blue states,” “lousy politicians,” “tax the air we breathe,” it’s not truly about any of those things.  It's all about fairness.

 

Jason T. hit on it when he mentioned brick and mortar stores.  Suppose you have a brick and mortar store from which you sell various items.  You have to price your item to not only cover its cost to you but to cover your overhead which includes rent, salary, insurance, utilities, etc.  Then you factor in a profit margin.  Simple Business 101.  As a merchant in a community you are required to collect a transaction privilege tax from your customers.  NOTE;  The customer is paying it, not the merchant.  The merchant collects the money, and essentially holds it in escrow for the taxing body until required to submit it to them.  These taxes cover a wide variety of governmental services.  Depending on the entity it could be police, fire, local municipal employees, parks, etc., etc.  All of these combine in a community to make it possible for you to do business in your B&M store.

 

You’re doing well then a neighbor opens an on-line store selling the exact same items you do.  Now, since he’s doing this part-time as a hobby-type business, has a full-time job, and works out of his house’s spare bedroom, his overhead is much lower than yours.  Thus he can sell his items at a lower price or take a higher margin and be priced where you are.  Regardless, he is not collecting any transaction privilege tax from his customers, thus denying various municipalities the funding needed to provide the services both you and he utilize.  You notice your sales, and revenue, dropping off, until finally, you cannot sustain your business any longer due to the unfair advantage your on-line neighbor has.

 

So, the push for on-line retailers to collect appropriate sales tax was actually driven by B&M merchants who only wanted a fair market place.  And, these generally were not little businesses but large ones, like Sears, Walmart, etc., who felt they were at a disadvantage to the burgeoning on-line retailers.  They went to work on state legislators.  Ultimately, states recognized the inequity in the market and the revenue they were missing out on.  Hence, laws were enacted to collect that revenue. 

 

It’s essentially the same thing that has happened as a result of VRBO and AirBnB.  Communities where there were a lot of vacation rentals were seeing a loss of tax revenue from hotels because the vacation rentals were not being taxed and the hotels were seeing a loss of room rental revenue, not to mention revenue from other sources, i.e., on site restaurants, bars, etc.  So, they started complaining about the unfair market advantage these on-line renters had and laws were ultimately changed.  Now, on-line renters are charging their customers sales/bed taxes if they meet the requirements to do so.

 

All seems fair to me.



#44 cutiger83

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 12:07 PM

 
All seems fair to me.



Excellent explanation! I agree that it all seems fair.

Kat

#45 vintageproductions

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 02:17 PM

I don’t usually respond to these types of discussions, and this one is old, but it is still relevant.  Despite comments such as, “Charge a sales tax,” “losing revenue,’ “greedy state governments,” “red states vs blue states,” “lousy politicians,” “tax the air we breathe,” it’s not truly about any of those things.  It's all about fairness.

 

Jason T. hit on it when he mentioned brick and mortar stores.  Suppose you have a brick and mortar store from which you sell various items.  You have to price your item to not only cover its cost to you but to cover your overhead which includes rent, salary, insurance, utilities, etc.  Then you factor in a profit margin.  Simple Business 101.  As a merchant in a community you are required to collect a transaction privilege tax from your customers.  NOTE;  The customer is paying it, not the merchant.  The merchant collects the money, and essentially holds it in escrow for the taxing body until required to submit it to them.  These taxes cover a wide variety of governmental services.  Depending on the entity it could be police, fire, local municipal employees, parks, etc., etc.  All of these combine in a community to make it possible for you to do business in your B&M store.

 

You’re doing well then a neighbor opens an on-line store selling the exact same items you do.  Now, since he’s doing this part-time as a hobby-type business, has a full-time job, and works out of his house’s spare bedroom, his overhead is much lower than yours.  Thus he can sell his items at a lower price or take a higher margin and be priced where you are.  Regardless, he is not collecting any transaction privilege tax from his customers, thus denying various municipalities the funding needed to provide the services both you and he utilize.  You notice your sales, and revenue, dropping off, until finally, you cannot sustain your business any longer due to the unfair advantage your on-line neighbor has.

 

So, the push for on-line retailers to collect appropriate sales tax was actually driven by B&M merchants who only wanted a fair market place.  And, these generally were not little businesses but large ones, like Sears, Walmart, etc., who felt they were at a disadvantage to the burgeoning on-line retailers.  They went to work on state legislators.  Ultimately, states recognized the inequity in the market and the revenue they were missing out on.  Hence, laws were enacted to collect that revenue. 

 

It’s essentially the same thing that has happened as a result of VRBO and AirBnB.  Communities where there were a lot of vacation rentals were seeing a loss of tax revenue from hotels because the vacation rentals were not being taxed and the hotels were seeing a loss of room rental revenue, not to mention revenue from other sources, i.e., on site restaurants, bars, etc.  So, they started complaining about the unfair market advantage these on-line renters had and laws were ultimately changed.  Now, on-line renters are charging their customers sales/bed taxes if they meet the requirements to do so.

 

All seems fair to me.

 

Well said
 



#46 aerialbridge

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 07:38 PM

FFZ,  I get what you're saying about "fairness" as far as  Brick and Mortar retail stores at a disadvantage to Virtual retailers    But is ebay all professional  "retail stores"?   What about all the casual sellers on ebay that don't do it for their sole source of income and are analogous to the weekend yard seller or guy that sets up a table at a swap meet or flea market?   How many of those people collect sales tax?   Or how many people collect sales tax when they sell their own, used car on Auto Trader, Craigstist, or park it at a vacant lot with a price sign or drive around with a price sign in the window?   But now the "private party" seller of a car, or cleaning out their garage, etc,  that decides to sell on ebay rather than spreading it out on the yard, will pay sales tax.   Please explain how comparing those "private party" apples to apples one paying sales tax, and one not paying sales tax, is "fair"?  



#47 vzemke

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Posted 16 September 2019 - 09:12 PM

The first difference is that eBay is the one collecting the tax, not the individual seller.  The second difference is that in many states and tax districts, those who set up more than once at the swap meet or flea market are legally required to collect sales tax (even though this may not be enforced, or more likely you don't see it being enforced).  

 

I'm just surprised that we made it all the way to 2019 to talk about this, as it's been an issue on the horizon for many years.  It was only a matter of time.



#48 MAW

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 04:46 AM

The "fairness" argument is a tangent to the principle.

 

Once government gets involved, it never gets out.  Remember Reagan's quote...."No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!".

 

The same idea is true of the collection of online taxes.

 

You can pretend that you will see some added benefit from this new revenue stream; or that your burden will be somewhat lessened; but in reality, whatever money is collected will go into the giant government coffer and simply be absorbed; unnoticed.  And once the process starts, it will never stop.

 

The only people genuinely affected are the consumers and entrepreneurs....both in a negative way.

 

The B&M stores have been caught in the mega-online transition over the past 15ish years...those that could adapt have; and the others have struggled or went defunct.



#49 Blacksmith

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Posted 17 September 2019 - 05:19 AM

I think you make a very broad apples to porcupines comparison.

The manner of commerce is completely different.

Most of what I see sold on eBay is not new Consumer Packaged Goods, it is pre-owned items, tantamount to a flea market / garage sale. By your perspective, should Gerty down the street start collecting sales tax when she sells an old quilt on her porch?

I think it is about fairness less than it is about states finding yet another taxable revenue stream. If the government really wants to focus on fairness, there are plenty of better places to start.

Trust me, I appreciate and frequent local businesses. That said, and as MAW mentions, the very essence of free market is the need to adapt to an ever-changing business landscape. There is nothing keeping them from posting their items online. Matter of fact, I cannot tell you how many times Ive walked into a local antique or gun store, and asked about military stuff, only to be told Oh, we put all of that stuff online.

Why? To maximize selling price, which is their right. They want the exposure, and the competition that it brings.

So who is really benefitting here?

I dont usually respond to these types of discussions, and this one is old, but it is still relevant.  Despite comments such as, Charge a sales tax, losing revenue, greedy state governments, red states vs blue states, lousy politicians, tax the air we breathe, its not truly about any of those things.  It's all about fairness.
 
Jason T. hit on it when he mentioned brick and mortar stores.  Suppose you have a brick and mortar store from which you sell various items.  You have to price your item to not only cover its cost to you but to cover your overhead which includes rent, salary, insurance, utilities, etc.  Then you factor in a profit margin.  Simple Business 101.  As a merchant in a community you are required to collect a transaction privilege tax from your customers.  NOTE;  The customer is paying it, not the merchant.  The merchant collects the money, and essentially holds it in escrow for the taxing body until required to submit it to them.  These taxes cover a wide variety of governmental services.  Depending on the entity it could be police, fire, local municipal employees, parks, etc., etc.  All of these combine in a community to make it possible for you to do business in your B&M store.
 
Youre doing well then a neighbor opens an on-line store selling the exact same items you do.  Now, since hes doing this part-time as a hobby-type business, has a full-time job, and works out of his houses spare bedroom, his overhead is much lower than yours.  Thus he can sell his items at a lower price or take a higher margin and be priced where you are.  Regardless, he is not collecting any transaction privilege tax from his customers, thus denying various municipalities the funding needed to provide the services both you and he utilize.  You notice your sales, and revenue, dropping off, until finally, you cannot sustain your business any longer due to the unfair advantage your on-line neighbor has.
 
So, the push for on-line retailers to collect appropriate sales tax was actually driven by B&M merchants who only wanted a fair market place.  And, these generally were not little businesses but large ones, like Sears, Walmart, etc., who felt they were at a disadvantage to the burgeoning on-line retailers.  They went to work on state legislators.  Ultimately, states recognized the inequity in the market and the revenue they were missing out on.  Hence, laws were enacted to collect that revenue. 
 
Its essentially the same thing that has happened as a result of VRBO and AirBnB.  Communities where there were a lot of vacation rentals were seeing a loss of tax revenue from hotels because the vacation rentals were not being taxed and the hotels were seeing a loss of room rental revenue, not to mention revenue from other sources, i.e., on site restaurants, bars, etc.  So, they started complaining about the unfair market advantage these on-line renters had and laws were ultimately changed.  Now, on-line renters are charging their customers sales/bed taxes if they meet the requirements to do so.
 
All seems fair to me.



#50 FFZFlyer

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Posted 18 September 2019 - 08:41 AM

FFZ,  I get what you're saying about "fairness" as far as  Brick and Mortar retail stores at a disadvantage to Virtual retailers    But is ebay all professional  "retail stores"?   What about all the casual sellers on ebay that don't do it for their sole source of income and are analogous to the weekend yard seller or guy that sets up a table at a swap meet or flea market?   How many of those people collect sales tax?   Or how many people collect sales tax when they sell their own, used car on Auto Trader, Craigstist, or park it at a vacant lot with a price sign or drive around with a price sign in the window?   But now the "private party" seller of a car, or cleaning out their garage, etc,  that decides to sell on ebay rather than spreading it out on the yard, will pay sales tax.   Please explain how comparing those "private party" apples to apples one paying sales tax, and one not paying sales tax, is "fair"?  

 

I'm not in a position to comment about all states and/or municipalities and how they administer their transaction privilege laws.  I can say that in my state there's an exemption for one-time transactions.  So, if you purchase a used car, boat, or airplane from an individual you are not required to pay sales tax.  However, if you are curbing 4-5 cars per week then, as far as I'm concerned, the government has the right to demand you register as a dealer and collect sales tax from your buyers.  Its the same thing with "retailers" who hid behind "garage sale" ordinances.  We had one neighbor who held a "garage" sale 2-3 times per month.  Her driveway was lined with racks of unused clothing and she even had a dressing room in her garage.  Once neighbors complained the city cracked down, limited her to the number of garage sales ordinances allowed and required her to obtain a transaction privilege license.  She was not happy, of course, but the local B&M merchants were.  This also applies to the "arts and crafts" boutiques set up at retirement trailer parks here.  These are supposed to be products of residents but most sellers are local individuals who try to bypass rules of swap meets and sell their products without collecting sales tax.  In one local case, it was a group of local merchants who complained to the city about trailer park arts and craft shows negatively impacting their sales since they were required to collect sales tax. The same thing goes for dealers at gun shows who claim they are conducting private one-on-one sales but their tables are loaded with product.

 

I recognize that there are individuals whose resentment of authority transcends reasonableness and whose hatred for the "god-danged gub'ment" is borderline psychotic but every penny they don't pay in taxes someone else has to cough up that penny.  

 

As for e-bay's policy of collecting from everyone, that, of course, is beyond my pay grade.  I would imagine, however, that it is easier for them to collect from everyone rather than police the entire seller community and require documentation that proves one is or isn't a dealer.

 

I spoke about "fairness" in the system, not "perfection."




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