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Rusted Buckle


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#1 TheGrayGhost

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 09:59 AM

Just got this bag with a heavily rusted buckle.  Not sure what to do with it, but it appears to be still active so I feel I need to do something while there is still time.  Looking for thoughts on how to deal with this.

 

IMG_6412.jpeg

 



#2 72psb

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 10:10 AM

Try soaking in white vinegar,I would test to see if it affects the webbing. Lot of you tube videos on rust removal.



#3 TheGrayGhost

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 10:13 AM

Affect on the webbing in a big concern.  This is a very rare bag and I can't risk doing more damage to it.  Just hoping to find some options at this point.



#4 72psb

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 06:14 AM

Just a thought. They make an airbrush type sand blaster for delicate work. I think Harbor Freight sells a version. You could mask over the webbing and try this method.You would have to fiqure out a method to keep the buckle from rusting again. This method at least does not introduce any chemicals into the mix.

Good luck.



#5 TheGrayGhost

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 09:04 AM

Some good thoughts there.  From what remains of the original finished, it appears to have just been blackened.  I suppose if I was able to completely remove the rust, I might be able to blacken it again.


Edited by TheGrayGhost, 20 March 2019 - 09:05 AM.


#6 Blacksmith

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 09:25 AM

There are already TONS of topics on this subject, if you check the forum area you posted this to.

Rust is rust, whether it be on a knife, helmet, buckle, etc...

Consensus - and certainly my opinion - is more is less. Yes, I said that how I meant to. :). The more you mess with it, the less it is worth. If there are flakey loose bits of corrosion, gently brush away with a clean toothbrush. Resist the urge to start working on it with steel wool, sandpaper, wire brush, etc.

Just like garlic bread, that goes from yellow to burnt black in the blink of an eye, once you get into clean metal there is no going back.

With a buckle, maybe wipe it with a lightly oiled rag, being careful to avoid the canvas strap.

A low-humidity space, with consistent temperature, is the best treatment.

Edited by Blacksmith, 20 March 2019 - 09:28 AM.


#7 TheGrayGhost

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 11:29 AM

Thanks for the info Blacksmith.  I did read though some of the threads, but it's nice to get opinions on my particular situation ;-)

 

I agree with the more is less sentiment.  I am firmly in the camp of find out my options, weigh them, then make a decision.  Don't just shoot from the hip!

 

I will probably start with the least invasive intervention, like you suggested, and see how it goes.



#8 RememberThe5thESB

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 01:44 PM

Try a pencil eraser. It works on brass corrosion, itll probably work right into the less is more for this piece.

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