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WWII Quartermaster School April 1945


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#1 Salvage Sailor

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 12:50 PM

Quartermaster Class US Naval Training Center Farragut, Idaho 16 April 1945

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#2 David Minton

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 01:24 PM

Interesting the Chief on the left isn't wearing any ribbons. With two service stripes, I would think he must have earned some.

#3 P-40Warhawk

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 01:27 PM

Nice photo. I think there is a museum up there now; someone on the forum (?) mentioned they were able to get a copy of a company photo from there. If I see the thread I will post the link here. They may be able to give an ID on the men in the photo?



#4 P-40Warhawk

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 01:29 PM

Here it is: http://www.usmilitar...g-station-wwii/



#5 Salvage Sailor

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 01:39 PM

ID of the graduate on the reverse, but not marked on the photo

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#6 sigsaye

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 03:06 PM

Interesting the Chief on the left isn't wearing any ribbons. With two service stripes, I would think he must have earned some.

. At least American Defense, and maybe a Good Conduct. But, back then, wearing ribbons was not a big thing. Many chose to only bother with them for special occasions. My dad was from this generation of Sailor. He only wore 9. He rated more, but thought 3 rows of 3 was a nice pattern. So he picked his favorites ( he rated many more than 9 BTW), and had them embroidered into a single set, one for blues and one for whites. Back then, they didnt have the multi row bars, and it could get Fiddley trying to line them up.

#7 Justin B.

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 03:53 PM

Quartermaster Class US Naval Training Center Farragut, Idaho 16 April 1945

 
QM strikers, that's great, thanks for posting.
 

For the ribbons, to add to what Steve has said, we see in WW2 blues were still worn for "working" occasions in cold weather more than they were later on, and in the pre-war regs CPOs had "working dress blue" uniforms, unlike officers. So even though the letter of the reg was that ribbons be worn, it's not surprising that some might not always bother.
 
It also looks like the chief on our left is wearing the light gray shirt, and maybe the other one too, it's hard to tell.



#8 sigsaye

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Posted 05 December 2018 - 07:16 PM

 
QM strikers, that's great, thanks for posting.
 

For the ribbons, to add to what Steve has said, we see in WW2 blues were still worn for "working" occasions in cold weather more than they were later on, and in the pre-war regs CPOs had "working dress blue" uniforms, unlike officers. So even though the letter of the reg was that ribbons be worn, it's not surprising that some might not always bother.
 
It also looks like the chief on our left is wearing the light gray shirt, and maybe the other one too, it's hard to tell.

. And the Chief on the right has over 20 years in, and has 4 ribbons

#9 David Minton

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 11:31 AM

. At least American Defense, and maybe a Good Conduct. But, back then, wearing ribbons was not a big thing. Many chose to only bother with them for special occasions. My dad was from this generation of Sailor. He only wore 9. He rated more, but thought 3 rows of 3 was a nice pattern. So he picked his favorites ( he rated many more than 9 BTW), and had them embroidered into a single set, one for blues and one for whites. Back then, they didnt have the multi row bars, and it could get Fiddley trying to line them up.

I can understand not wearing ribbons all the time, but would think the photo shoot would be a special occasion, and especially since the more senior (based on service stripes) Chief was wearing his.

#10 sigsaye

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Posted 07 December 2018 - 02:00 PM

I can understand not wearing ribbons all the time, but would think the photo shoot would be a special occasion, and especially since the more senior (based on service stripes) Chief was wearing his.

. When I was training recruits, Company Picture Day, was sort of a hassle. The first couple times, you would get all dressed up in your dress blues or whites. Then change back into working blues or whites after. Eventually, you stop bothering to get dressed up. You still have a full day. Photos are normally taken somewhere after half way so they can be ready by graduation. So, for instructors, its another day, another evolution in the schedule


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