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Jump Boots - Preservation


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#1 peppersteak122

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Posted 11 June 2018 - 07:36 AM

Hi All,

 

I guess the topic would apply to any WWI or WWII era leather boots.  I just purchased a pair of WWII jump boots from a fellow member here.  The condition is great, given 74 years old period.

 

What should I do to preserve them?  I mean besides putting them in an A/C controlled and enclosed environment.  Should I oil them?  Would that depreciation its historical value?  If I need to oil them, what type of oil to use?

 

Thanks,

 



#2 268th C.A.

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Posted 11 June 2018 - 08:43 AM

This is a topic that has been discussed many times. I do not personally use anything on my boots. Oils will actually deteriorate the leather over long periods. Some will say its OK. But I do not use anything on any of 30 plus pairs of boots I have in my collection. 



#3 yp221

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Posted 11 June 2018 - 08:44 AM

Do absolutely nothing. Pretty much anything you'll do is irreversible and require further treatments or applications. I think everyone has experienced the effects of well intentioned preservation attempts when it comes to leather. Usually the results are not what you intended. Others disagree and swear by a variety of techniques amd products, personally i leave my leather stuff alone.

Edited by yp221, 11 June 2018 - 08:45 AM.


#4 peppersteak122

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Posted 11 June 2018 - 09:19 AM

Hi Guys, thanks.  Does the same principle apply to the leather wrap on the WWII bayonet as well?



#5 yp221

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Posted 11 June 2018 - 03:23 PM

Hi Guys, thanks.  Does the same principle apply to the leather wrap on the WWII bayonet as well?


I would say so. Old leather is old leather. There really isnt anything that can be done to reverse or halt the aging process besides proper storage and minimal handling. Over the years I've tried to buy the best example (as far as condition is concerned) of an item I can. Generally, this saves me the trouble of worrying as much about deterioration and its saves me from constantly searching for better examples of an item.

#6 268th C.A.

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Posted 12 June 2018 - 10:36 AM

I agree with yp221



#7 Kadet

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Posted 22 June 2018 - 02:11 AM

My very first pieces of militaria were two minty WWII German leather K98 ammo pouches. They still smelled like new leather when I got them, so that should tell you how long ago it was. I still have them in my collection. They now smell like old leather, but are in exactly the same condition as when I received them. If it is stored and handled properly, old leather will outlast all of us. Damaged leather cannot be "restored" with oils or other products. In fact, these products actually inflict more damage on the object and make it less desirable to most collectors. Just leave them alone..




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