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REPAIRING A PLASTER STATUE


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#1 BEAST

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 08:42 AM

I don't know if this was the correct place for this topic or if modeling would have been more appropriate. I recently received a WWII era plaster statue of an American Airman. This came from the studios of Hoosier artist E.M. Viquesney who created the "Spirit of the American Doughboy" that you see at many parks and courthouses.

As you can see from the photos, the head sustained serious damage and I would like to repair it. Also, I would like to match the paint and would appreciate any recommendations to do so.

I did pick up some ready made plaster to do the repair and am currently researching youtube videos and other sites for advices. Any thoughts you folks have would be greatly appreciated!

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#2 Bodes

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 09:18 AM

Matching paint color and repairing back of head could be difficult....Piece displays well, may want to leave as is...Bodes

#3 gwb123

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 07:06 PM

Matching paint color and repairing back of head could be difficult....Piece displays well, may want to leave as is...Bodes

 

I was thinking the same thing.  That is going to be a tough repair to pull off.



#4 BEAST

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 07:31 PM

Thanks guys, I've considered it.  Maybe what I need to do is stabilize it.  I've read that white glue is the best to prevent further damage.  Any thoughts or other options?



#5 doyler

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Posted 23 May 2018 - 07:31 PM

You may also try and contact someone who repairs pottery.We have a local Stoneware club and they have a person in the club who does repairs.I seen some handles on pitchers and repeirs to the edge/lip of crocks etc.

 

Also reach out to member Kanemono(Dick).He may have some suggestions as to repair or paint finish.He is an outstanding artist and sculptor



#6 Bluehawk

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Posted 24 May 2018 - 05:14 AM

The repair can be done, fairly easily and not terribly expensively by any competent objects conservator. Regional museum curators or registrars are a good source for local referrals.

 

This is one repair I would not try without professional help. Matching plaster type, securing new plaster to old, and stabilizing that metal armature are key issues.



#7 Garandomatic

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Posted 24 May 2018 - 06:08 AM

Done this a few times for a local church's nativity pieces.  Such a small spot, I personally wouldn't be too afraid of it if it were my job to fix.

 

Difficult was matcing 100+ year old paint on a random white metal alloy piece that had fallen and lost an arm.  Sculptor was one of Rodin's assistants.  I didn't do the metal, but I nailed the paint.



#8 BEAST

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Posted 24 May 2018 - 06:08 AM

You may also try and contact someone who repairs pottery.We have a local Stoneware club and they have a person in the club who does repairs.I seen some handles on pitchers and repeirs to the edge/lip of crocks etc.
 
Also reach out to member Kanemono(Dick).He may have some suggestions as to repair or paint finish.He is an outstanding artist and sculptor


Thanks Ron! I had forgotten about Dick, his miniatures are amazing.

#9 BEAST

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Posted 24 May 2018 - 06:10 AM

The repair can be done, fairly easily and not terribly expensively by any competent objects conservator. Regional museum curators or registrars are a good source for local referrals.
 
This is one repair I would not try without professional help. Matching plaster type, securing new plaster to old, and stabilizing that metal armature are key issues.


Thanks Bluehawk, I'll check with the Indianapolis Museum of Art and see if they have any recommendations.

#10 BEAST

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Posted 24 May 2018 - 07:47 AM

You may also try and contact someone who repairs pottery.We have a local Stoneware club and they have a person in the club who does repairs.I seen some handles on pitchers and repeirs to the edge/lip of crocks etc.
 
Also reach out to member Kanemono(Dick).He may have some suggestions as to repair or paint finish.He is an outstanding artist and sculptor


Ron, Thanks for the suggestion about the pottery clubs too. I'm sure we have some here that should be able to provide some guidance.


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