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Collins & Co. Spanish American War Sword?

Started by sundance , Nov 30 2017 06:01 PM

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#1 sundance

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 06:01 PM

I know I'm breaking a cardinal rule by asking a question  without posting a photo but...... I've been offered a short bladed ( 28 inches ) sword with a large eagle head pommel and what appears to be a dark bone handle punctuated by 3 rivets. The blade is marked "Collins & Co., LEGITIMUS, Hartford, Agero Fino, Calidad, Garantizada and #86". it has an "s" shaped crossguard with raised leaves running end to end on both sides. It comes with a leather scabbard tooled along its entire length also marked " Collins & Co. LEGITIMUS and "16". The blade is heavy, about 1 1/4 inch wide along its entire length and ends in a spear point. I see similar ones described as Spanish American war swords. The blade seems more suited to hacking through brush than being used as a weapon but could certainly be effectively used as one. Would this be of Spanish American War vintage? I see there is a book about Collins edged weapons which I'll try to find. Also, I'll try to get some photos up. Thanks.



#2 doyler

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 06:51 PM

it sounds like one of the Collins contracted for a Foreign Army I believe they are attributed to Spain/Cuba from the Span Am War era.

machete.jpg

 

machete3.jpg

 

machete2.jpg

 



#3 doyler

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 07:17 PM

Collins history.

 

https://connecticuth...pany-of-canton/

 

 



#4 sundance

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Posted 30 November 2017 - 07:19 PM

It looks very much like the one in the first photo. Thanks. The only difference I see is that it has a smooth grip. The grip in your first photo looks textured.



#5 sundance

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 02:31 PM

The way the sword is marked certainly leads one to believe it was produced for another country.  It certainly wouldn't have been built for an adversary though, right? I guess the connection to the Spanish American War confuses me (or was it just a connection to the Spanish American war era?)



#6 doyler

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 02:49 PM

The sword is a variation of a machete as I understand it.

This is taken from the article I posted which stated in 1840 after restructuring of the company they expand with machete sales


"the company expanded abroad with the machete; it sold more than 150 varieties of machetes in 35 countries, supplying 80% of the worlds machetes at that time."

This is no different than the US buying swords or handle material From Germany prior to WW1 and WW2. The green horn handles on various patterns of Collins knives and Machetes was sourced from Germany as it was a better grade or quality horn suitable for handles I have read.This importation stopped when war broke out in Europe.

#7 SKIPH

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 03:08 PM

FWIW- I had a conversation w/ a guy who grew up near the old Collins Factory in Connecticut. He stated they used to wade in the
waterfalls below the factory as a kid, and find discarded axe heads, and other implements from the factory. SKIP

#8 sundance

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Posted 01 December 2017 - 04:55 PM

Doyler and Skiph - thanks for the information.



#9 Horseclover

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Posted 02 December 2017 - 06:48 AM

There is a very good but a bit dated article on cutacha

http://therionarms.c...ticles/cutacha/

 

Prime examples of the Collins eagles are getting few and far between.

 

Collins did a number of beasts as motif.  There is a page out there somewhere with a list of them.  IIRC, the wolf version was the first animal.  The cutacha though were often Solingen manufacture.  These eagles were all originally meant for Cuban officers.

 

Cheers

 

GC



#10 sundance

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Posted 02 December 2017 - 08:22 AM

Horseclover - thanks for the article. Little by little I'm getting to know this sword/machete.




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