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Huge Portrait of an unknown officer

Started by hink441 , Sep 15 2017 02:38 PM

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#1 hink441

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 02:38 PM

This antique shop has this huge portrait of a military officer. His collar insignia is "USV" with Colonel ranks on the shoulder boards.

I have no idea who this is, any ideas?

Sorry for the horrible picture.

image.jpeg

#2 BEAST

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 03:02 PM

In person, can you see his branch insignia? You might be able to make out his regimental number. Also, it appears that there is a signature in the lower left corner. That might give you a clue about where it was painted.

#3 hink441

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 03:07 PM

In person, can you see his branch insignia? You might be able to make out his regimental number. Also, it appears that there is a signature in the lower left corner. That might give you a clue about where it was painted.


I will have to go back tomorrow and take a closer look. Would the branch insignia be behind the "USV" collar insignia?

I did not even notice the signature, I will try and get a better picture tomorrow.

Chris

#4 Salvage Sailor

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 03:31 PM

Looks to be Spanish American War era to me, United States Volunteers

 

From Wiki:

 

United States Volunteers also known as U.S. Volunteers, U. S. Vol., or U.S.V. were military volunteers enlisted in the United States Army who were separate from the Regular Army.
 
Starting as early as 1861 these regiments were often referred to as the Volunteer Army of the United States but not officially named (codified into law) that until 1898.
 
During the nineteenth century this was the United States federal government's main means for raising large forces of citizen-soldiers needed in wartime to augment the small Regular Army and organized militia and National Guard. The U.S. Volunteers were the forerunner of the National Army in World War I and the Army of the United States in World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War.
 
The U.S. Volunteers did not exist in times of peace. Unlike the militia, which, under the United States Constitution, each state recruited, trained, equipped, and maintained locally, with regimental officers appointed and promoted by state governors and not kept in federal service for more than nine months nor sent outside the country, the U.S. Volunteers were enlisted for terms of one to three years, and between 1794 and 1902 fought outside the country.
 
Regiments and batteries became known as "Volunteers" to distinguish between state and regular army units.


#5 MastersMate

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 04:39 PM

Bushy moustache,  kind of resembles Theodore Roosevelt ???



#6 aznation

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 04:54 PM

Wonder what the price is on that portrait?



#7 hink441

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 05:25 PM

Wonder what the price is on that portrait?


I believe it was on sale for $1200

#8 aznation

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 05:29 PM

Wow, okay...thanks.



#9 Sarge8

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Posted 15 September 2017 - 06:13 PM

Might be a label or writing on the back, too.



#10 BEAST

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Posted 16 September 2017 - 09:11 AM

Hi Chris,

Yes, his branch insignia will be behind the "USV." At the base of the insignia (most likely Infantry), between the butts of the muskets, should be the state abbreviation. At the top should be his regimental number.

#11 hink441

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 05:23 AM

Sorry it took longer than expected to get back to the store. I also apologize for the poor photos.

Looks like he was in the 4th Virginia Infantry. I think this is George W. Taylor Colonel.

The artist is "Count Varonsky". I could find no other info on this portrait. I was unable to look at the back of the portrait.

Any ideas? This portrait is located in Norfolk Va.

Chris

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

Edited by hink441, 28 September 2017 - 05:30 AM.


#12 hink441

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 05:28 AM

I have no idea who "Count Varonsky" is???????

image.jpeg

image.jpeg

#13 BEAST

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 05:41 AM

That is a nice portrait! According to their roster, George W. Taylor was the Colonel for the 4th VA Infantry

http://www.spanamwar...4thvaroster.htm

#14 BEAST

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 05:45 AM

By the way, here is an article on Taylor's revolver. https://pilotonline....84fe9e4cba.html

If you scroll through the photos, you'll find a similar photo of him.

#15 hink441

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Posted 28 September 2017 - 06:07 AM

By the way, here is an article on Taylor's revolver. https://pilotonline....84fe9e4cba.html

If you scroll through the photos, you'll find a similar photo of him.


That is definetly the same man. That is truly a fine looking pistol with excellent engraving that ties everything together. Col. George W. Taylor US Vols 4th Virginia Infantry.



image.jpeg


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