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Military Order of the World Wars


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#1 Kevin Beyer

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 08:59 AM

Hello, All,

Established in 1919 to promote the welfare of our nation, the Military Order of the World Wars is an organization that is still in existance today. Prominent members of the MOWW were Gen. Pershing, Gen. MacArthur, Gen. Marshall, Pres. Truman, Gen. Westmoreland, and Pres. Reagan.

Below is a Past Chapter Commander Neck Ribbon as denoted by the gold palms.


MOWWCommander.jpg
MOWWCommanderClose.jpg

Note that the ribbon color is the reverse repeating rainbow of the World War I Victory medal.

Kevin

#2 Holloman

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Posted 17 February 2007 - 10:01 PM

I know that they sponser a medal for AFJROTC, as 2 of my friends have recieved it. The Medal and Ribbon both have the rainbow material that the above picture is made of.

#3 Kevin Beyer

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Posted 18 February 2007 - 05:01 AM

I know that they sponser a medal for AFJROTC, as 2 of my friends have recieved it. The Medal and Ribbon both have the rainbow material that the above picture is made of.


From the MOWW website, this is the JROTC award for merit:

Posted Image

I do not have any other MOWW medals in my collection. But, if I were to come across any, I would most likely pick them up.

Kevin

#4 BEAST

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Posted 09 February 2008 - 11:41 AM

This was a garage sale find from a few years ago. This was from the estate of BG Albert Franklin. IIRC, he was a chapter commander in Florida.


FRANKLIN_INSIGNIA_RESIZED.jpg

FRANKLIN_MIL_ORDER_WW_CLOSEUP.jpg

FRANKLIN_MIL_ORDER_WW_CLOSEUP_REVERSE.jpg



#5 frederick

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Posted 10 February 2008 - 12:13 PM

Did not know the significance of the gold palms on officers neck ribbons until this posting. Thank you.

Have not seen many of this groups badges, but note that prior to WWII they were the Military Order of the World War. After WWII they add the letter 'S' to war; a title they use currently.

The attached photo of early member's badges was breast style and appear to have serial numbers for a while. Note also that these badge have a bar suspension on the badge while the current officers badge has a ring suspension. Does anyone have a current member's badge to illustrate attachment to the ribbon?

Have only found one other type of MOWW badge, a Patrick Henry Patriotic Award in miniature. Assume there must be other awards.

Frederick

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  • MOWW_1ab.jpg
  • MOWW_mini.jpg


#6 Kevin Beyer

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Posted 12 February 2008 - 03:29 PM

In regards to the palms, this information comes from an official history book of the Military Order of the World War:


DISTINGUISHING OF NATIONAL OFFICERS


In the January-February-March 1922 National Bulletin, it was prescribed that National Officers and officials of Chapters and Departments would be distinguished by the number of silver palms worn on the neck ribbon as follows:

Commander-in-Chief 4 palms
Senior Vice Commander-in-Chief 3 palms
Junior Vice Commander-in-Chief 3 palms
Remaining members of General Staff and other National Officers 2 palms
Department Vice Commanders 1 palm
Chapter Commanders 1 palm

It further provided that at the expiration of his term of office, a former official will wear gold palms instead of silver palms. This designation lasted through 1950.

A new Article VI was added to the Bylaws of the Military Order at the 1927 National Convention which to a large extent confirmed the initial administrative decision in regard to the number of palms worn by National Officers, except that Junior Vice Commanders-in-Chief were allotted two palms and Vice Commanders-in-Chief three palms. This decision lasted through 1950.

It was not until the 1950s that there arose pressure to specially distinguish the State Commanders from Chapter Commanders, by authorizing State Commanders to wear two palms. Since State Commanders were not members of the General Staff, there arose a necessity to specifically recognize the General Staff with three palms and to add one palm to the ribbon of the Vice Commander-in-Chief and the Commander in Chief.

The prized insignia is worn by all National Officers and former National Officers at all meetings of the Order.

Kevin

#7 Kevin Beyer

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Posted 24 February 2008 - 08:45 AM

I have just added a reunion badge for the Military Order of the World Wars to my collection. I knew neither that they had reunions, nor that they made badge for them. This one is from the 1969 annual convention held in Savannah, Ga. The thin plate (tin?) pendant reads "Military Order of the World Wars/ 1919 - 1969/Golden Anniversary". I don't plan on starting a MOWW reunion badge collection, but adding their Golden Anniversary reunion badge seems fitting.

MOWW1969Savannah.jpg MOWW1969SavannahClose.jpg

Does anyone else have, or know of, reunion badges such as this? As I said, I've never seen them before.

Kevin

#8 Kevin Beyer

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 07:50 AM

From its inception on January 27th, 1919, until October 28, 1942, this organization was known as the Military Order of the World War (not plural) as previously indicated by USMF member frederick. To my knowledge there are no distinguishing features of these early membership badges to denote their years of production. As with other examples that I have seen, they are made by the Medallic Art Company of New York.

As previously mentioned, the number and color of palms on the ribbon denote the rank of the MOWW member. The following example is that of a Senior or Junior Vice Commander-in-Chief. I have not determined the meaning for the addition of an "E" as well as two succeeding stars.

a.jpg

Kevin

Edited by Kevin Beyer, 21 March 2010 - 07:51 AM.


#9 Kevin Beyer

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 07:50 AM

b.jpg

#10 Kevin Beyer

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 07:51 AM

c.jpg

#11 Kevin Beyer

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Posted 21 March 2010 - 08:36 AM

I just did a little homework and I discovered what the additional accouterments denote:

Letter D--Dept. Commander
Letter E--Emeritus
Letter R--Region Commander
Letter S--National. General Staff
(for all of the above, two are required for wear with the Neck Ribbon)

To signify the length of membership in MOWW, an Hour Glass device may be placed on the ribbon. A Bronze device for 10 years, Silver for 15 years, and Gold for 20 or more years. To show Perpetual Membership in MOWW, a Silver star may also be placed on the ribbon above the hour glass device. Only one star and one hour glass may be displayed on the membership ribbon.

Kevin

#12 Tim B

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 10:58 PM

This is a very old thread but I wanted to add to it and ask, what were the differences between the neck and breast awards?

As this one is of the first variety with singular "World War" and numbered, is there a way to trace recipients?

Thanks,

Tim

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  • Military Order of the World War.JPG


#13 firefighter

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 06:29 AM

I used to see these medals a lot awhile back.Never thought much of them because they were not the Victory Medal's just a society medal.Seems like, at least to me, that they are getting harder to find.Are they that collectible and are they worth much? They are nice looking.

Edited by firefighter, 22 December 2012 - 06:30 AM.


#14 Tim B

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 03:26 PM

I used to see these medals a lot awhile back.Never thought much of them because they were not the Victory Medal's just a society medal.Seems like, at least to me, that they are getting harder to find.Are they that collectible and are they worth much? They are nice looking.



Hi firefighter,

Like you, I never really paid much attention to them as I usually stick to the officially issued military decorations and medals. They certainly are nice looking and I'm curious about who were issued the medals and if their were any specific requirements other than basic membership.

Sad that even a vintage veterans medal has more quality in it compared to something made for official issue these days.

Thanks for looking!

Tim

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  • Military Order of the World War 1.JPG


#15 Kevin Beyer

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 03:00 PM

I just read through the MOWW Policy Manual ( http://www.militaryo...29 May 2012.pdf ) and could not find any reference to the use of the neck badge versus the breast badge. I would speculate that the neck badge represented a member who was currently serving as an officer of the organization, whereas the breast badge represented membership. Based on insignia provided by the organization, it does not appear that the breast badge is an item currently employed by the MOWW. It is my guess that they no longer use it.

Kevin

#16 Tim B

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 09:06 PM

Hi Kevin,

Thanks for that link. I browsed a few of the official sites but did not really find any worthwhile information on the actual medal. My initial assessment was along the same lines as yours.

I do read in the policy manual where is discusses the wear of the medal under "Hearaldry & The Wear of Items" (pg's 17-19) and briefly mentions a MOWW Membership lapel pin and medal (para 2 e), that is worn on the left breast. It doesn't go into specific details or show any illustrations of it.

Additionally, Chapter 10, para E, "Individual Awards & Citations" does list a MOWW Membership Medal (7.) (pg 90) but again, does not show any illustration. The written description does appear to describe what I would assume to be the current version of the vintage medal I have.

Thanks again!

Tim


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