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Identifying pins and patches

Started by Lightech , Aug 10 2017 09:50 AM

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#1 Lightech

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 09:50 AM

I received a box from family that included military artifacts from my grandparents. Could I have help identifying what would be worn by my grandmother as a lieutenant in the Army Nurse Corps and by my grandfather as a lieutenant in the Medical Administrative Corps? Thank you!

Erva Irene Watson enlisted in the Red Cross Nurse Reserve in June 1941. She was sent to Camp Barkeley on duty at Station Hospital. By Jan 1942, she was 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Nurse Corps. By January 1945, she was 1st Lt.

Stuart Brown Quist was enlisted as a private in April 1942 and sent to Camp Barkeley. After meeting Erva, he enrolled in Officer Candidate School. According to his journal, he took his corporal stripes off to put his OCS patch on. After OCS, he got a job as a dispatcher at the Medical Replacement Training Center motor park in June 1943. We don't know what he did between 1943 and his discharge in January 1946. But when his wife got diagnosed with severe rheumatoid arthritis, he would constantly request a transfer to be near her hospitals.

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#2 cutiger83

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Posted 10 August 2017 - 10:26 AM

The two rectangular pieces at the top are lieutenant insignia. The gold is 2nd lieutenant and the silver is 1st lieutenant. These would have been worn by your grandmother as a nurse and your grandfather after OCS. 

 

The 3 US insignia are officer's insignia which would have been worn with the lieutenant bars. 

 

The two small round discs are enlisted insignia for the medical corps. These would have been worn by your grandfather. The larger round disc is the enlisted cap insignia which would also have been worn by your grandfather. 

 

The insignia in the middle with the N is nurse's insignia for your grandmother. 

 

The two insignia pieces with the A would have been your grandfather's once he was an officer in the Medical Administrative Corps. 

 

The insignia down the right side would have been your grandfather's enlisted rank insignia. The one with one stripe is a private. The one with 2 stripes is a corporal. 

 

The round piece at the very bottom on the left is the ruptured duck which means they served in WWII. This was worn by men and women. If it is a pin back it is probably your grandmothers. It is has a straight pin for a lapel, then it is probably your grandfathers. 

 

The ribbon bars in the middle would have been for serving in overseas campaigns. Do you know if your grandmother served overseas? 

 

Very nice items from your grandparents....Kat



#3 Dogsbody

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 01:57 AM

I received a box from family that included military artifacts from my grandparents. Could I have help identifying what would be worn by my grandmother as a lieutenant in the Army Nurse Corps and by my grandfather as a lieutenant in the Medical Administrative Corps? Thank you!

Erva Irene Watson enlisted in the Red Cross Nurse Reserve in June 1941. She was sent to Camp Barkeley on duty at Station Hospital. By Jan 1942, she was 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Nurse Corps. By January 1945, she was 1st Lt.

Stuart Brown Quist was enlisted as a private in April 1942 and sent to Camp Barkeley. After meeting Erva, he enrolled in Officer Candidate School. According to his journal, he took his corporal stripes off to put his OCS patch on. After OCS, he got a job as a dispatcher at the Medical Replacement Training Center motor park in June 1943. We don't know what he did between 1943 and his discharge in January 1946. But when his wife got diagnosed with severe rheumatoid arthritis, he would constantly request a transfer to be near her hospitals.

 

Hello Lightech,

 

Kat gave already a very good description of the artifacts of your grandparents. I'd like to add a little info on the ribbon bar. From left to right you see the American Defence ribbon, the American Campaign ribbon and the European-African-Middle Eastern (in short EAME) ribbon with 2 campaign stars.

 

Since the American Defence ribbon was awarded for active service between september 8 1939 an december 6th 1941 ( and your grandfather enlisted in 1942) I would safely conclude that the ribbon bar belonged to your grandmother. If so, she also served in the ETO and took part in 2 campaigns denoted by the 2 stars on the EAME ribbon.

 

The American Campaign ribbon is awarded for military service performed in the American Theater of operations.

 

I believe the patch represents the Services of Supply.

 

I hope this helps.

 

Rene
 



#4 Lee Ragan

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 06:31 AM

The single stripe is for a Private First Class. A Private would have no rank insignia



#5 Allan H.

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Posted 13 August 2017 - 07:30 AM

The shoulder patch is "Army Service Forces." We usually think of that as supply, but in reality, units that were assigned to ASF performed a number of functions.

 

Allan




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