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Harpers Ferry 1836 Blunderbuss

Started by Silvio , Jul 10 2017 01:35 AM

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#1 Silvio

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 01:35 AM

Hi all,

 

I want to show you this Blunderbuss.

Converted from a Model 1816.Lockplate is marked 1836.

Mechanism is working.Some pitting on the barrel/parts so it could be used by the navy

 

Thank you for watching

 

IMG_0075.JPG

 

 



#2 Silvio

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 01:36 AM

IMG_0077.JPG

 

 



#3 USARV72

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 05:02 AM

Nice piece. Flash pan original?

#4 Silvio

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 05:37 AM

Thank you

 

Flash pan is matching the other parts and is as far i know original



#5 Silvio

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 10:00 AM

IMG_0076.JPG  lockplate

 

It seems that the barrel/parts has some coating in the past{blue/grey},i read about these practise done to weapons when used on ships to protect against the salt environment 



#6 mikie

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 11:35 AM

That's just amazing!

Mikie



#7 vonmoen

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 11:39 AM

I've never seen an example used by the US Navy in the early 19th Century so it could very well be one. But it also looks a lot like a "canoe gun" used by Trappers in the 1830s-50s. Many were converted military muskets, often sold or traded to the Native Americans. They look pretty badass to me.

#8 Silvio

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Posted 10 July 2017 - 01:08 PM

Thank you,

 

These where widespread used but the navy was the first thing i thought about.

I never knew the trappers fur traders used these type of weapons,its a interesting time for sure.the coaches,artillery used them also.

I removed the barrel and to see the construction as its build very firmly and steady,there is a markings on the barrel  {36} maybe coincidence or referring to the production date same as the lockplate.



#9 Big Al

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Posted 14 July 2017 - 04:09 PM

It reminds me of a Turkish or Caucasian blunderbuss. Blunderbusses from those two locales typically feature a dwarf butt not meant to be held to the shoulder and a barrel similar in length to what is seen here. Even if there is provision for a ramrod, it was carried suspended from a lanyard around the neck.



#10 Silvio

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 04:57 AM

Thank you,

i could imagine they wear it loose or maybe in a bag or pocket as a backup weapon

regards

#11 Dagda

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 11:49 AM

Beautiful!



#12 Silvio

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Posted 20 July 2017 - 12:47 AM

Thank you,

i will post some better images when i, m home from my African roadtrip

#13 Silvio

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 01:22 AM

Today i removed the barrel.

There are some markings on the tang and underside barrel

Lenght without tang is 23,7 cm so this will be around 9,33 inch

 

IMG_0591.JPG



#14 Silvio

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Posted 27 July 2017 - 01:22 AM

Markings

 

IMG_0599.JPG




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